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Dual Boot from two different physical drives

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Domenick, May 23, 2010.

  1. Domenick

    Domenick Flightless Bird

    I would like to know how to DUAL BOOT using two different physical hard
    drives. Is this possible? I currently have a machine running XP Pro with a
    BUNCH of older apps and custom legacy apps for my company. I don't use this
    very often, but I will occasionally need to boot up from this hard drive and
    run this machine in its current state. I am going to put in a separate
    physical hard drive and install Win 7 (probably) and boot from this drive 80%
    of the time.

    How do I accomplish this? What additional software do I need (note: might
    not use win 7 so it would need to be software that could boot ubuntu or
    another copy of XP from the second drive as well).

    I've never done a dual boot before so any instructions or links would be
    appreciated.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Pegasus [MVP]

    Pegasus [MVP] Flightless Bird

    "Domenick" <Domenick@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:5E417C59-C442-4856-BB1E-A183895AA03D@microsoft.com...
    > I would like to know how to DUAL BOOT using two different physical hard
    > drives. Is this possible? I currently have a machine running XP Pro with a
    > BUNCH of older apps and custom legacy apps for my company. I don't use
    > this
    > very often, but I will occasionally need to boot up from this hard drive
    > and
    > run this machine in its current state. I am going to put in a separate
    > physical hard drive and install Win 7 (probably) and boot from this drive
    > 80%
    > of the time.
    >
    > How do I accomplish this? What additional software do I need (note: might
    > not use win 7 so it would need to be software that could boot ubuntu or
    > another copy of XP from the second drive as well).
    >
    > I've never done a dual boot before so any instructions or links would be
    > appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks.


    IMHO the best way to do this is to use a proper boot manager. The native
    Windows boot manager does to deserve this description. I usually use XOSL -
    it lets you boot into any OS installed on any disk on any type of partition,
    primary or logical. And it's free. Post again if you need detailed
    instructions.
     
  3. Stefan Patric

    Stefan Patric Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 23 May 2010 07:31:01 -0700, Domenick wrote:

    > I would like to know how to DUAL BOOT using two different physical hard
    > drives. Is this possible? I currently have a machine running XP Pro with
    > a BUNCH of older apps and custom legacy apps for my company. I don't use
    > this very often, but I will occasionally need to boot up from this hard
    > drive and run this machine in its current state. I am going to put in a
    > separate physical hard drive and install Win 7 (probably) and boot from
    > this drive 80% of the time.
    >
    > How do I accomplish this? What additional software do I need (note:
    > might not use win 7 so it would need to be software that could boot
    > ubuntu or another copy of XP from the second drive as well).
    >
    > I've never done a dual boot before so any instructions or links would be
    > appreciated.


    Before you do anything, check the specs of your machine to see if it can
    even run W7. Remember that the "minimums" listed by Microsoft are just
    to install and run the OS. You need more for your apps. I usually
    double the RAM minimums, at least. Also, check that there are compatible
    drivers for all your hardware and peripherals.

    If you are going to run Ubuntu (or another version of Linux), too, its
    boot manager, grub, can handle the multiple booting. Just install Ubuntu
    last, and it will configure the multi-boot automatically, usually.
    ("Usually" means "backup/clone everything before attempting.")
    Otherwise, you have to install a suitable Windows-based boot manager.
    The "standard" Windows boot loader is really only designed to boot one OS
    well.

    Stef
     
  4. Anna

    Anna Flightless Bird

    "Domenick" <Domenick@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:5E417C59-C442-4856-BB1E-A183895AA03D@microsoft.com...
    > I would like to know how to DUAL BOOT using two different physical hard
    > drives. Is this possible? I currently have a machine running XP Pro with a
    > BUNCH of older apps and custom legacy apps for my company. I don't use
    > this
    > very often, but I will occasionally need to boot up from this hard drive
    > and
    > run this machine in its current state. I am going to put in a separate
    > physical hard drive and install Win 7 (probably) and boot from this drive
    > 80%
    > of the time.
    >
    > How do I accomplish this? What additional software do I need (note: might
    > not use win 7 so it would need to be software that could boot ubuntu or
    > another copy of XP from the second drive as well).
    >
    > I've never done a dual boot before so any instructions or links would be
    > appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks.


    Domenick:
    You haven't mentioned the type of PC you're working with but I'm assuming
    it's a desktop machine since you've indicated you're contemplating
    installing another HDD.

    That being the case is there any possibility you could consider equipping
    the machine with one (or even better - two) removable hard drive(s)? In
    order to do this your desktop PC case would need at least one available
    (vacant) 5 1/4" bay to accommodate the mobile rack housing the removable
    HDD.

    Assuming your desktop case will have at least one available (vacant) 5 1/4"
    bay (two such would be even better), consider installing a removable HDD to
    house another HDD in addition to your internal HDD.

    I don't know how familiar you are with these devices so let me give you a
    bit of info on them. Basically they're two-piece affairs - the "mobile rack"
    itself and the inner tray or caddy (in which the hard drive resides) that
    slides into the rack. They come in all-aluminum models or a combination of
    aluminum-plastic, or all-plastic, ranging in price from about $15 to $50.
    Mobile racks come in various versions, depending upon whether the hard drive
    to be housed is an IDE/ATA, SATA, or SCSI device. A Google search for
    "removable hard drive mobile racks" will result in a wealth of information
    on these products and their vendors.

    The installation of these devices is simplicity itself - no more difficult
    than installing an optical drive. After the rack is installed you make two
    simple connections (power & data cable), then plop the hard drive into the
    removable tray (caddy),and slide the tray into the mobile rack. That's all
    there is to it. Note that the removable hard drive mobile racks we are
    discussing are designed to be installed in desktop computers and not laptop
    or notebook computers. The size, weight, and design considerations of
    laptops/notebooks (generally) do not allow for this hardware configuration.

    These mobile racks are nearly always equipped with a ON-OFF keylock, so a
    simple turn of the key, in effect, activates/deactivates the HDD. For added
    security you can push or pull the removable tray in or out using the tray's
    handle and thus electrically/physically connect or disconnect the HDD from
    the system. No more difficult than opening or closing a small desk drawer.

    Do you see the enormous advantage of this type of hardware configuration as
    it applies to your particular objective re creating a dual-boot
    configuration? In your particular situation (assuming you would be working
    with a single removable HDD rather than two removable HDDs) you would
    install one of your HDDs internally and using another HDD, install that
    latter drive in the removable tray of the mobile rack. Assuming you're
    working with SATA HDDs the latter HDD would be connected to your
    motherboard's first (SATA0 or SATA1) connector, while the
    internally-connected SATA HDD would be connected to the second (SATA1 or
    SATA2) connector. (Naturally I'm assuming this is a non-RAID configuration).
    So when the removable HDD is "on" (usually implemented through a simple turn
    of the mobile rack's keylock), the system will boot to that drive and the
    internally-connected HDD would serve as a secondary HDD. When the removable
    HDD is "off", the system would boot to the internally-connected SATA HDD.

    Thus with this hardware configuration you could, for example, install the
    Windows 7 OS on the removable HDD and install the Windows XP OS on your
    internal HDD. Thus each OS is effectively isolated from each other except
    when the user desires otherwise. There's no need to fiddle with
    modifications of the BIOS settings nor setting up a multi-boot type of
    program to affect the boot process. It's an ideal system for computing with
    multiple operating systems and/or meeting one's special interests when using
    multiple HDDs.

    For even additional flexibility working with your HDDs, installing *two*
    removable HDDs would be even better. Obviously you would need *two* vacant 5
    1/4" bays on your desktop case to achieve this configuration. Again, with
    this configuration, each drive is effectively isolated from each other, but
    if for any reason you want both drives connected during boot up, you can
    easily achieve that configuration as well.

    Keep in mind that another significant advantage of using a removable HDD is
    that now you can have an *unlimited* number of HDDs at your disposal by
    simply using additional removable trays in the installed mobile rack to
    house additional drives. So another important advantage of using this
    hardware configuration is that you'll be able to use one or more other
    removable HDDs as one or more backups drive for your day-to-day working
    HDDs.

    We've worked with these removable hard drive affairs for about 15 years now
    and have helped hundreds of users install & operate this kind of system.
    Virtually ever user we're aware of has found this hardware arrangement a
    most desirable configuration in a desktop PC environment. We've encountered
    no negative performance issues using these devices in comparison with
    internally-installed HDDs and find the flexibility and peace of mind you
    gain from this hardware configuration an enormous advantage in day-to-day PC
    operations.

    So do give it some thought should it be practical in your situation.
    Anna
     
  5. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    Pegasus [MVP] wrote:

    > IMHO the best way to do this is to use a proper boot manager. The
    > native Windows boot manager does to deserve this description. I
    > usually use XOSL - it lets you boot into any OS installed on any disk
    > on any type of partition, primary or logical. And it's free. Post
    > again if you need detailed instructions.


    In your experience, how does XOSL compare with GRUB?
     
  6. bobster

    bobster Flightless Bird

    Domenick, Anna has given you some excellent advice. Several years ago, she
    gave me some similar advice and it has served me well.

    "Dual boot" to most people means having two operating systems on the same
    physical HD -- just on different partitions. In the days when HDs were very
    limited in size and were costly, this made sense but with 320+gig HDs
    available now for under $50, dealing with the hassle of a same HD, dual boot
    configuration doesn't make sense unless one is really strapped for cash.

    Here's the configuration I have and it works fine for me:

    Two internal SATA300 HDs and one external one mounted in a Vantec SATA
    enclosure ($30). All three are WD 320gig units ($50 each). My computer (a
    low end Dell Inspiron 530) gives me a pre-boot option to boot to any one of
    the three. In my case, they all have identical contents, XP/SP3 systems but
    they could just as well be 3 different OSs, XP, W7 and Obuntu e.g.. In my
    case, I'm currently only interested in XP but I will probably load one with
    Win 7 in the near future. Actually, I have a 4th backup HD in my bank safe
    deposit box in case of fire, a bit paranoid maybe but as a retired engineer
    I like to have all bases covered including my house burning down.

    The one thing that Anna didn't mention was the value of a good HD cloning
    app. This allows one to quickly clone the contents of any one HD to another
    HD as a backup. Again, extra HDs are under $50. I have been using Casper
    for this function for several years -- it's now in version 6.0. It works
    flawlessly for me.

    Good luck

    ==============================================================
    "Anna" <iamanna@mystic.net> wrote in message
    news:umAQPCr%23KHA.4308@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...


    "Domenick" <Domenick@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:5E417C59-C442-4856-BB1E-A183895AA03D@microsoft.com...
    > I would like to know how to DUAL BOOT using two different physical hard
    > drives. Is this possible? I currently have a machine running XP Pro with a
    > BUNCH of older apps and custom legacy apps for my company. I don't use
    > this
    > very often, but I will occasionally need to boot up from this hard drive
    > and
    > run this machine in its current state. I am going to put in a separate
    > physical hard drive and install Win 7 (probably) and boot from this drive
    > 80%
    > of the time.
    >
    > How do I accomplish this? What additional software do I need (note: might
    > not use win 7 so it would need to be software that could boot ubuntu or
    > another copy of XP from the second drive as well).
    >
    > I've never done a dual boot before so any instructions or links would be
    > appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks.


    Domenick:
    You haven't mentioned the type of PC you're working with but I'm assuming
    it's a desktop machine since you've indicated you're contemplating
    installing another HDD.

    That being the case is there any possibility you could consider equipping
    the machine with one (or even better - two) removable hard drive(s)? In
    order to do this your desktop PC case would need at least one available
    (vacant) 5 1/4" bay to accommodate the mobile rack housing the removable
    HDD.

    Assuming your desktop case will have at least one available (vacant) 5 1/4"
    bay (two such would be even better), consider installing a removable HDD to
    house another HDD in addition to your internal HDD.

    I don't know how familiar you are with these devices so let me give you a
    bit of info on them. Basically they're two-piece affairs - the "mobile rack"
    itself and the inner tray or caddy (in which the hard drive resides) that
    slides into the rack. They come in all-aluminum models or a combination of
    aluminum-plastic, or all-plastic, ranging in price from about $15 to $50.
    Mobile racks come in various versions, depending upon whether the hard drive
    to be housed is an IDE/ATA, SATA, or SCSI device. A Google search for
    "removable hard drive mobile racks" will result in a wealth of information
    on these products and their vendors.

    The installation of these devices is simplicity itself - no more difficult
    than installing an optical drive. After the rack is installed you make two
    simple connections (power & data cable), then plop the hard drive into the
    removable tray (caddy),and slide the tray into the mobile rack. That's all
    there is to it. Note that the removable hard drive mobile racks we are
    discussing are designed to be installed in desktop computers and not laptop
    or notebook computers. The size, weight, and design considerations of
    laptops/notebooks (generally) do not allow for this hardware configuration.

    These mobile racks are nearly always equipped with a ON-OFF keylock, so a
    simple turn of the key, in effect, activates/deactivates the HDD. For added
    security you can push or pull the removable tray in or out using the tray's
    handle and thus electrically/physically connect or disconnect the HDD from
    the system. No more difficult than opening or closing a small desk drawer.

    Do you see the enormous advantage of this type of hardware configuration as
    it applies to your particular objective re creating a dual-boot
    configuration? In your particular situation (assuming you would be working
    with a single removable HDD rather than two removable HDDs) you would
    install one of your HDDs internally and using another HDD, install that
    latter drive in the removable tray of the mobile rack. Assuming you're
    working with SATA HDDs the latter HDD would be connected to your
    motherboard's first (SATA0 or SATA1) connector, while the
    internally-connected SATA HDD would be connected to the second (SATA1 or
    SATA2) connector. (Naturally I'm assuming this is a non-RAID configuration).
    So when the removable HDD is "on" (usually implemented through a simple turn
    of the mobile rack's keylock), the system will boot to that drive and the
    internally-connected HDD would serve as a secondary HDD. When the removable
    HDD is "off", the system would boot to the internally-connected SATA HDD.

    Thus with this hardware configuration you could, for example, install the
    Windows 7 OS on the removable HDD and install the Windows XP OS on your
    internal HDD. Thus each OS is effectively isolated from each other except
    when the user desires otherwise. There's no need to fiddle with
    modifications of the BIOS settings nor setting up a multi-boot type of
    program to affect the boot process. It's an ideal system for computing with
    multiple operating systems and/or meeting one's special interests when using
    multiple HDDs.

    For even additional flexibility working with your HDDs, installing *two*
    removable HDDs would be even better. Obviously you would need *two* vacant 5
    1/4" bays on your desktop case to achieve this configuration. Again, with
    this configuration, each drive is effectively isolated from each other, but
    if for any reason you want both drives connected during boot up, you can
    easily achieve that configuration as well.

    Keep in mind that another significant advantage of using a removable HDD is
    that now you can have an *unlimited* number of HDDs at your disposal by
    simply using additional removable trays in the installed mobile rack to
    house additional drives. So another important advantage of using this
    hardware configuration is that you'll be able to use one or more other
    removable HDDs as one or more backups drive for your day-to-day working
    HDDs.

    We've worked with these removable hard drive affairs for about 15 years now
    and have helped hundreds of users install & operate this kind of system.
    Virtually ever user we're aware of has found this hardware arrangement a
    most desirable configuration in a desktop PC environment. We've encountered
    no negative performance issues using these devices in comparison with
    internally-installed HDDs and find the flexibility and peace of mind you
    gain from this hardware configuration an enormous advantage in day-to-day PC
    operations.

    So do give it some thought should it be practical in your situation.
    Anna
     
  7. Johnw

    Johnw Flightless Bird

    Domenick brought next idea :
    > I would like to know how to DUAL BOOT using two different physical hard
    > drives. Is this possible? I currently have a machine running XP Pro with a
    > BUNCH of older apps and custom legacy apps for my company. I don't use this
    > very often, but I will occasionally need to boot up from this hard drive and
    > run this machine in its current state. I am going to put in a separate
    > physical hard drive and install Win 7 (probably) and boot from this drive 80%
    > of the time.
    >
    > How do I accomplish this? What additional software do I need (note: might
    > not use win 7 so it would need to be software that could boot ubuntu or
    > another copy of XP from the second drive as well).
    >
    > I've never done a dual boot before so any instructions or links would be
    > appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks.


    I had XP on a sata drive, moved it to a spare ide drive using > XXCLONE
    ( which I have used many times before )
    http://xxclone.com/idwnload.htm
    Removed the XP ide drive & installed W7 ( 32 bit ) on the clean sata
    drive, using the built in W7 delete partition & format option.
    http://www.blackviper.com/Articles/OS/InstallXPHome/images/image1_5.html
    After making sure both drives worked perfectly on their own ( the XP
    Ide drive is tested before cleaning it off the sata drive ) I left both
    drives jumpered as master & connected to their respective cables. The
    ide drive is on the last connector,

    Now I choose which operating system I want to use, by pressing F8
    during boot or pressing Del & going into the bios & selecting.
    F8 & Del are the keys on my bios version, it does vary from motherboard
    to motherboard.
    If I don't want to change operating systems, I do nothing & it boots
    into the one I have choosen as default.

    All my programs worked on W7 including older versions such as FastStone
    Screen Capture ( This is the last freeware version, beginning with ver.
    5.4, it is now shareware)

    If I am in XP, I can read & write to W7, if I am in W7, I can read &
    write to XP.
     
  8. Pegasus [MVP]

    Pegasus [MVP] Flightless Bird

    "Daave" <daave@example.com> wrote in message
    news:uq#CDms#KHA.5476@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > Pegasus [MVP] wrote:
    >
    >> IMHO the best way to do this is to use a proper boot manager. The
    >> native Windows boot manager does to deserve this description. I
    >> usually use XOSL - it lets you boot into any OS installed on any disk
    >> on any type of partition, primary or logical. And it's free. Post
    >> again if you need detailed instructions.

    >
    > In your experience, how does XOSL compare with GRUB?


    Sorry, can't compare as I have never used Grub.
     
  9. sgopus

    sgopus Flightless Bird

    Check on windows 7 forum to be sure, I think W7 requires the primary drive to
    be installed. If your running short of space on your HD, I would buy a larger
    drive, and clone your existing install to the new one, ie clone to a
    different size partition than destination, Acronis TI will accomplish this
    task. and then install W7 on the left over partition, allowing enough room ie
    40g or more I would suggest more 60-80g just to be sure, as W7 can take up
    lots of room, along with installed programs.
    W7 will read your existing install of xp and install a boot menu, also be
    advised if you want to change the default OS you will need a boot manager
    that reads W7 and XP, W7 marks it the default OS on install.

    "Domenick" wrote:

    > I would like to know how to DUAL BOOT using two different physical hard
    > drives. Is this possible? I currently have a machine running XP Pro with a
    > BUNCH of older apps and custom legacy apps for my company. I don't use this
    > very often, but I will occasionally need to boot up from this hard drive and
    > run this machine in its current state. I am going to put in a separate
    > physical hard drive and install Win 7 (probably) and boot from this drive 80%
    > of the time.
    >
    > How do I accomplish this? What additional software do I need (note: might
    > not use win 7 so it would need to be software that could boot ubuntu or
    > another copy of XP from the second drive as well).
    >
    > I've never done a dual boot before so any instructions or links would be
    > appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks.
     
  10. software

    software Flightless Bird

    partition wizard

    partition wizard can tech you how to do it http://www.mt-solution.ca/download.htm



    Domenick wrote:

    Dual Boot from two different physical drives
    23-May-10

    I would like to know how to DUAL BOOT using two different physical hard
    drives. Is this possible? I currently have a machine running XP Pro with a
    BUNCH of older apps and custom legacy apps for my company. I do not use this
    very often, but I will occasionally need to boot up from this hard drive and
    run this machine in its current state. I am going to put in a separate
    physical hard drive and install Win 7 (probably) and boot from this drive 80%
    of the time.

    How do I accomplish this? What additional software do I need (note: might
    not use win 7 so it would need to be software that could boot ubuntu or
    another copy of XP from the second drive as well).

    I have never done a dual boot before so any instructions or links would be
    appreciated.

    Thanks.

    Previous Posts In This Thread:


    Submitted via EggHeadCafe - Software Developer Portal of Choice
    Distributed Data Grids - Share Objects Between Windows Service and ASP.NET
    http://www.eggheadcafe.com/tutorial...b7a-1bb00e33db07/distributed-data-grids-.aspx
     
  11. PA Bear [MS MVP]

    PA Bear [MS MVP] Flightless Bird

    Re: partition wizard

    kin it tech u to spel?

    software wrote:
    > partition wizard can tech you how to do it
    > http://www.mt-solution.ca/download.htm
    >
    >
    >
    > Domenick wrote:
    >
    > Dual Boot from two different physical drives
    > 23-May-10
    >
    > I would like to know how to DUAL BOOT using two different physical hard
    > drives. Is this possible? I currently have a machine running XP Pro with a
    > BUNCH of older apps and custom legacy apps for my company. I do not use
    > this
    > very often, but I will occasionally need to boot up from this hard drive
    > and
    > run this machine in its current state. I am going to put in a separate
    > physical hard drive and install Win 7 (probably) and boot from this drive
    > 80%
    > of the time.
    >
    > How do I accomplish this? What additional software do I need (note: might
    > not use win 7 so it would need to be software that could boot ubuntu or
    > another copy of XP from the second drive as well).
    >
    > I have never done a dual boot before so any instructions or links would be
    > appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Previous Posts In This Thread:
    >
    >
    > Submitted via EggHeadCafe - Software Developer Portal of Choice
    > Distributed Data Grids - Share Objects Between Windows Service and ASP.NET
    > http://www.eggheadcafe.com/tutorial...b7a-1bb00e33db07/distributed-data-grids-.aspx
     
  12. choro

    choro Flightless Bird

    Re: partition wizard

    PA Bear [MS MVP] wrote:
    > kin it tech u to spel?


    I am sure his spelling of English is much better than your spelling of HIS
    language would be... ;-)
    --
    choro
    *****
    >
    > software wrote:
    >> partition wizard can tech you how to do it
    >> http://www.mt-solution.ca/download.htm
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Domenick wrote:
    >>
    >> Dual Boot from two different physical drives
    >> 23-May-10
    >>
    >> I would like to know how to DUAL BOOT using two different physical
    >> hard drives. Is this possible? I currently have a machine running XP
    >> Pro with a BUNCH of older apps and custom legacy apps for my
    >> company. I do not use this
    >> very often, but I will occasionally need to boot up from this hard
    >> drive and
    >> run this machine in its current state. I am going to put in a
    >> separate physical hard drive and install Win 7 (probably) and boot
    >> from this drive 80%
    >> of the time.
    >>
    >> How do I accomplish this? What additional software do I need (note:
    >> might not use win 7 so it would need to be software that could boot
    >> ubuntu or another copy of XP from the second drive as well).
    >>
    >> I have never done a dual boot before so any instructions or links
    >> would be appreciated.
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >> Previous Posts In This Thread:
    >>
    >>
    >> Submitted via EggHeadCafe - Software Developer Portal of Choice
    >> Distributed Data Grids - Share Objects Between Windows Service and
    >> ASP.NET
    >> http://www.eggheadcafe.com/tutorial...b7a-1bb00e33db07/distributed-data-grids-.aspx
     

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