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Defrag Problem

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Roy S, Jul 1, 2010.

  1. Roy S

    Roy S Flightless Bird

    I am not able to improve defrag of my laptop hard drive with 27%
    defragmentation per analysis using Windows or Norton 360 software. Do I need
    to reformat the hard drive and perform reinstallation? Any suggestions?
     
  2. Randem

    Randem Flightless Bird

    either use a smarter program like SmartDefrag or find the settings in the
    program that you use to achieve better positioning.

    --
    The Top Inno Setup Script Generator - http://www.randem.com/innoscript.html
     
  3. HeyBub

    HeyBub Flightless Bird

    Roy S wrote:
    > I am not able to improve defrag of my laptop hard drive with 27%
    > defragmentation per analysis using Windows or Norton 360 software. Do
    > I need to reformat the hard drive and perform reinstallation? Any
    > suggestions?


    1. Get rid of Norton.
    2. Defragging a consumer computer, such as a laptop, is never needed and
    can, as you have demonstrated, result in lost time and much confusion.
     
  4. Jim

    Jim Flightless Bird

    On Thu, 1 Jul 2010 23:24:04 -0700, Roy S
    <RoyS@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    >I am not able to improve defrag of my laptop hard drive with 27%
    >defragmentation per analysis using Windows or Norton 360 software. Do I need
    >to reformat the hard drive and perform reinstallation? Any suggestions?


    D/l and try
    http://www.piriform.com/defraggler ( free)
     
  5. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    Roy S wrote:
    > I am not able to improve defrag of my laptop hard drive with 27%
    > defragmentation per analysis using Windows or Norton 360 software. Do
    > I need to reformat the hard drive and perform reinstallation? Any
    > suggestions?


    With older operating systems (like Windows 98), defragging made sense.
    But it is nowhere near as important with systems like Windows XP. So,
    you might not notice much improvement (if any) after a defrag.

    Does your PC perform poorly? If so, we can address that and correct it.

    For starters. Norton 360 tends to slow down many computers. You should
    consider uninstalling it (yes, I know you paid for it) and substituting
    superior programs which are easier on the PC's resources. If you decide
    you'd like to do that, post back and you'll get recommendations as well
    as the proper method to remove Norton.

    Other things about your PC you should mention:

    1. Make and model

    2. Amount of RAM

    3. Size of hard drive and amount of free space

    4. Other security programs that you run
     
  6. Nil

    Nil Flightless Bird

    On 02 Jul 2010, "HeyBub" <heybub@gmail.com> wrote in
    microsoft.public.windowsxp.general:

    > 2. Defragging a consumer computer, such as a laptop, is never
    > needed and can, as you have demonstrated, result in lost time and
    > much confusion.


    I wouldn't say that. It can help improve performance if the files are
    very fragmented and/or if the drive is getting full. An occasional
    defrag is a good thing.

    27% defragmented sounds high, but if there is lots of space left on the
    drive, it really doesn't matter much. If the drive was quite full, I'd
    clean up the drive by deleting as many unneeded files as possible, then
    try defragging again. It might help to move data files temporarily to
    another drive before defragging, then move them back when done.
    Window's degragmenter doesn't do a very thorough job when the drive is
    full. Some third-party products may do better. I like MyDefrag
    (http://www.mydefrag.com/) and I run it once every month or three.

    The OP may be confused by the analysis, but he has demonstrated nothing
    about the desirability of defragmenting, and neither have you.
     
  7. Roy S

    Roy S Flightless Bird

    In working with Norton Tech, I found Norton 360 uses Windows defragger and
    there appears to be a problem with it in that a clean defragged disk reads
    very high with it. Does anyone know a fix for Windows degrag analyzer?

    "Roy S" wrote:

    > I am not able to improve defrag of my laptop hard drive with 27%
    > defragmentation per analysis using Windows or Norton 360 software. Do I need
    > to reformat the hard drive and perform reinstallation? Any suggestions?
    >
     
  8. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    Never needed is completely erroneous. It depends on how fragmented the drive
    is. An occasional defrag is beneficial
    in more than one way.
    "HeyBub" <heybub@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:uk9pEreGLHA.3640@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > Roy S wrote:
    >> I am not able to improve defrag of my laptop hard drive with 27%
    >> defragmentation per analysis using Windows or Norton 360 software. Do
    >> I need to reformat the hard drive and perform reinstallation? Any
    >> suggestions?

    >
    > 1. Get rid of Norton.
    > 2. Defragging a consumer computer, such as a laptop, is never needed and
    > can, as you have demonstrated, result in lost time and much confusion.
    >
     
  9. rif

    rif Flightless Bird

    Norton 360 can be hard on resources and make your system slow, however
    if defrag says your drive is 27% fragmented, that is high and you should
    run defrag.

    Defrag may not run properly if you drive is full or nearly full. Check
    your drive and see how much disk space you have and see if you can
    delete some files or programs.
     
  10. HeyBub

    HeyBub Flightless Bird

    Unknown wrote:
    > Never needed is completely erroneous. It depends on how fragmented
    > the drive is. An occasional defrag is beneficial
    > in more than one way.


    You're right. When I said "defrag is never needed" (on an NTFS drive), I was
    exaggerating for the purpose of emphasis. For the average home user, once
    every three to five years may help to a modest degree.

    Oh, and the number of fragment on an NTFS system is irrelevant to the file
    system's efficiency.
     
  11. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    You had best get informed rather than opinionated.
    "HeyBub" <heybub@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:umZ9RdHHLHA.5920@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > Unknown wrote:
    >> Never needed is completely erroneous. It depends on how fragmented
    >> the drive is. An occasional defrag is beneficial
    >> in more than one way.

    >
    > You're right. When I said "defrag is never needed" (on an NTFS drive), I
    > was exaggerating for the purpose of emphasis. For the average home user,
    > once every three to five years may help to a modest degree.
    >
    > Oh, and the number of fragment on an NTFS system is irrelevant to the file
    > system's efficiency.
    >
     
  12. Leythos

    Leythos Flightless Bird

    In article <umZ9RdHHLHA.5920@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl>, heybub@gmail.com
    says...
    >
    > Unknown wrote:
    > > Never needed is completely erroneous. It depends on how fragmented
    > > the drive is. An occasional defrag is beneficial
    > > in more than one way.

    >
    > You're right. When I said "defrag is never needed" (on an NTFS drive), I was
    > exaggerating for the purpose of emphasis. For the average home user, once
    > every three to five years may help to a modest degree.
    >
    > Oh, and the number of fragment on an NTFS system is irrelevant to the file
    > system's efficiency.


    You can't possibly make that assumption without a clear set of defining
    characteristics for "Average Home User".

    In the case of many "Average Home Users" that do music, video, games,
    etc... a defrag every 6 months or so is beneficial, YES, for NTFS, since
    it becomes highly fragmented after mass changes to files sizes and
    additions/deletions.

    You might want to get a LOT more experience in home users computers as
    well as servers (both on NTFS) to understand the performance impact of
    file fragmentation.

    --
    You can't trust your best friends, your five senses, only the little
    voice inside you that most civilians don't even hear -- Listen to that.
    Trust yourself.
    spam999free@rrohio.com (remove 999 for proper email address)
     
  13. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Roy S wrote:
    > In working with Norton Tech, I found Norton 360 uses Windows defragger and
    > there appears to be a problem with it in that a clean defragged disk reads
    > very high with it. Does anyone know a fix for Windows degrag analyzer?
    >
    > "Roy S" wrote:
    >
    >> I am not able to improve defrag of my laptop hard drive with 27%
    >> defragmentation per analysis using Windows or Norton 360 software. Do I need
    >> to reformat the hard drive and perform reinstallation? Any suggestions?
    >>


    I have a technique for defragging, that doesn't use a defragmentation program.
    I use "backup, re-initialize_partition, restore" as a means to fix up the
    partition. I just did the procedure, and it took me about 2 hours. One
    disadvantage of the method, is it can't be scripted, and requires
    error-prone manual intervention. The 2 hour time, includes doing a
    backup of C:, sector by sector, to ensure nothing can be lost if there
    are problems.

    This is my defragmentation report, after having just done the procedure.
    This is the third time I've done this, since installing WinXP.

    ********************************************************************************
    Volume WINXP (C:)
    Volume size = 72.56 GB
    Cluster size = 32 KB
    Used space = 49.31 GB
    Free space = 23.25 GB
    Percent free space = 32 %

    Volume fragmentation
    Total fragmentation = 0 %
    File fragmentation = 0 %
    Free space fragmentation = 0 %

    File fragmentation
    Total files = 176,471
    Average file size = 244 KB
    Total fragmented files = 1
    Total excess fragments = 1
    Average fragments per file = 1.00

    Pagefile fragmentation
    Pagefile size = 2.00 GB
    Total fragments = 1

    Folder fragmentation
    Total folders = 13,379
    Fragmented folders = 69
    Excess folder fragments = 91

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Fragments File Size Most fragmented files
    2 2 MB \WINDOWS\WindowsUpdate.log
    ********************************************************************************

    My colored graph consists of a green bar (which could be the pagefile),
    a white area of equal size (room for hiberfil.sys?). A large blue bar,
    a white gap, and another large blue bar. There are no red bars to be seen,
    although there should be one for the WindowsUpdate file, which already
    got fragmented when Windows booted.

    You can make it easier for the Windows defragmenter to do its job,
    by arranging for a larger percentage of free space on the drive.
    You can also look at using a third-party defragmentation tool.

    There are forums where you can find discussions and comments from users.

    http://techrepublic.com.com/5208-13...317742&messageID=3167455&tag=leftCol;post-717

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_defragmentation_software

    Paul
     
  14. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    When are you going to quit making an ass of yourself? Have you no self
    respect?
    "HeyBub" <heybub@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:umZ9RdHHLHA.5920@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    > Unknown wrote:
    >> Never needed is completely erroneous. It depends on how fragmented
    >> the drive is. An occasional defrag is beneficial
    >> in more than one way.

    >
    > You're right. When I said "defrag is never needed" (on an NTFS drive), I
    > was exaggerating for the purpose of emphasis. For the average home user,
    > once every three to five years may help to a modest degree.
    >
    > Oh, and the number of fragment on an NTFS system is irrelevant to the file
    > system's efficiency.
    >
     
  15. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In news:%23NoLy2bGLHA.1996@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl,
    Randem <newsgroups@randem.com> typed:
    > either use a smarter program like SmartDefrag or find the
    > settings in the program that you use to achieve better
    > positioning.


    BS - without knowing WHAT is still fragmented, no accurate guesses can be
    made. Both programs indicated as having been used are good and would/should
    defrag the disk just fine.

    HTH,

    Twayne`
     
  16. Randem

    Randem Flightless Bird

    That is EXACTLY why one should use a smarter program that tells of such
    information...

    Try doing the work instead of guessing and giving wrong answers expecially
    trying to debunk others...

    A little work and proof keeps bad answers at bay...

    --
    The Top Script Generator for Jordan Russell's Inno Setup -
    http://www.randem.com/innoscript.html
    Free Utilities and Code - http://www.randem.com/freesoftutil.html
     
  17. Gib R. Ish

    Gib R. Ish Flightless Bird

    Only HoopleHeads don't leave any remnant of the post they're replying to,
    further confusing the issue.

    You still don't know how to use a newsgroup, do you? That's a rhetorical
    question.

    "Randem" <newsgroups@randem.com> wrote in message
    news:%23XOr5NhHLHA.4824@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    : That is EXACTLY why one should use a smarter program that tells of such
    : information...
    :
    : Try doing the work instead of guessing and giving wrong answers expecially
    : trying to debunk others...
    :
    : A little work and proof keeps bad answers at bay...
     
  18. Randem

    Randem Flightless Bird

  19. Leythos

    Leythos Flightless Bird

    In article <u5jaZdhHLHA.1996@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl>,
    newsgroups@randem.com says...
    >
    > If you cannot follow a post you definitely cannot follow line of thought...


    Typical, since the start of Usenet, practice has been to leave something
    to see what one is responding to - not all threads are 100% in Usenet.

    --
    You can't trust your best friends, your five senses, only the little
    voice inside you that most civilians don't even hear -- Listen to that.
    Trust yourself.
    spam999free@rrohio.com (remove 999 for proper email address)
     
  20. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In news:i12pbk$cqr$1@news.eternal-september.org,
    Gib R. Ish <gib@ish.invalid> typed:
    > Only HoopleHeads don't leave any remnant of the post
    > they're replying to, further confusing the issue.
    >
    > You still don't know how to use a newsgroup, do you? That's
    > a rhetorical question.
    >
    > "Randem" <newsgroups@randem.com> wrote in message
    > news:%23XOr5NhHLHA.4824@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
    >> That is EXACTLY why one should use a smarter program that
    >> tells of such information...
    >>
    >> Try doing the work instead of guessing and giving wrong
    >> answers expecially trying to debunk others...
    >>
    >> A little work and proof keeps bad answers at bay...


    Randem is one for whom the laws of physcs suspend themselves for his
    purposes.
     

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