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Certificate of Authenticty

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by mm, Jan 29, 2010.

  1. mm

    mm Flightless Bird

    A friend was given a computer with XP, through a recycling list. It
    has the MS Certificate of Authenticity sticker, with the Product Key,
    on the bottom. It seems to me she intended to give him the XP
    license also, and he can use that number if, for example, he wants to
    upgrade an old computer or assemble a new computer. Do you agree?

    OTOH, I was given a computer, an eMachine, but without the harddrive,
    and it too has the XP C of A sticker on the bottom with the Product
    Key, but my guess is he didn't intend to give me the license, because
    he kept the harddrive. Do you agree? (He was moving and that's
    why he gave his old junk away, and that's also why I can't reach him.)


    OT3H, in a few years, when most people have changed to Vista and 7,
    there will be loads of licenses around that no one wants, isn't that
    likely?

    Or at least that no one uses. Will they be selling them?

    If I try to use that license years from now, will it warn me it's
    still in use without screwing up the guy who was nice enough to give
    me the computer?

    Or should I try to track him down now?

    Thanks a lot.
     
  2. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    mm wrote:
    > A friend was given a computer with XP, through a recycling list. It
    > has the MS Certificate of Authenticity sticker, with the Product Key,
    > on the bottom. It seems to me she intended to give him the XP
    > license also, and he can use that number if, for example, he wants to
    > upgrade an old computer or assemble a new computer. Do you agree?
    >
    > OTOH, I was given a computer, an eMachine, but without the harddrive,
    > and it too has the XP C of A sticker on the bottom with the Product
    > Key, but my guess is he didn't intend to give me the license, because
    > he kept the harddrive. Do you agree? (He was moving and that's
    > why he gave his old junk away, and that's also why I can't reach him.)


    I don't understand. The COA sticker with the Product Key *is* the
    license. Are you talking about insallation CDs perhaps? Retail
    installation CDs and Generic OEM (System Builder) CDs also come with
    Certificates of Authenticity with Product Keys.

    With regard to the first paragraph, assuming it is an OEM license, it is
    tied to that computer and the EULA does not permit it to be used on any
    other PC.

    With regard to the second paragraph, you can install a hard drive if you
    wish and install XP on it; the COA sticker is proof you have the right
    to do this. I'm not sure which method the manufacturer provided to
    reinstall Windows with that particular PC. Perhaps the *old* hard drive
    had a hidden recovery partition. If that is the case, you would
    obviously need to come up with another method. :) If eMachine provided
    a Recovery CD, that should work. Also, a generic OEM installation CD of
    the matching type of XP (e.g., Home or Pro) -- matching the license
    indicated on the COA sticker, that is -- will work if you use the COA
    sticker's Product Key.

    > OT3H, in a few years, when most people have changed to Vista and 7,
    > there will be loads of licenses around that no one wants, isn't that
    > likely?


    Not pertinent if they are OEM licenses that have already been used.
    Remember those licenses are not transferrable (per the EULA).

    > Or at least that no one uses. Will they be selling them?
    >
    > If I try to use that license years from now, will it warn me it's
    > still in use without screwing up the guy who was nice enough to give
    > me the computer?


    There won't be any warning if you are still using the same PC the nice
    guy was using.
     
  3. Andrew E.

    Andrew E. Flightless Bird

    Well that certificate is from the mfg,not microsoft,the multi-license is
    for that machine only,not transferable.Also,its been registered to another
    person (registered at thier home/office,with a specific
    name,adress,tele-phone
    nos,etc).Same with other pcs that have been pitched,for 1 reason or another.
    You'd need alot more verifiable data to simply re-use the license,microsoft
    does
    keep very good records...

    "mm" wrote:

    > A friend was given a computer with XP, through a recycling list. It
    > has the MS Certificate of Authenticity sticker, with the Product Key,
    > on the bottom. It seems to me she intended to give him the XP
    > license also, and he can use that number if, for example, he wants to
    > upgrade an old computer or assemble a new computer. Do you agree?
    >
    > OTOH, I was given a computer, an eMachine, but without the harddrive,
    > and it too has the XP C of A sticker on the bottom with the Product
    > Key, but my guess is he didn't intend to give me the license, because
    > he kept the harddrive. Do you agree? (He was moving and that's
    > why he gave his old junk away, and that's also why I can't reach him.)
    >
    >
    > OT3H, in a few years, when most people have changed to Vista and 7,
    > there will be loads of licenses around that no one wants, isn't that
    > likely?
    >
    > Or at least that no one uses. Will they be selling them?
    >
    > If I try to use that license years from now, will it warn me it's
    > still in use without screwing up the guy who was nice enough to give
    > me the computer?
    >
    > Or should I try to track him down now?
    >
    > Thanks a lot.
    > .
    >
     
  4. ANONYMOUS

    ANONYMOUS Flightless Bird

    mm" <NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
    news:ia87m5p8bd4otpm97idplj7gibkkpt7gkm@4ax.com...
    >A friend was given a computer with XP, through a recycling list. It
    > has the MS Certificate of Authenticity sticker, with the Product Key,
    > on the bottom. It seems to me she intended to give him the XP
    > license also, and he can use that number if, for example, he wants to
    > upgrade an old computer or assemble a new computer. Do you agree?


    NO - he was just too lazy to do anything!

    >
    > OTOH, I was given a computer, an eMachine, but without the harddrive,
    > and it too has the XP C of A sticker on the bottom with the Product
    > Key, but my guess is he didn't intend to give me the license, because
    > he kept the harddrive. Do you agree? (He was moving and that's
    > why he gave his old junk away, and that's also why I can't reach him.)


    NO, he didn't want you to see his bad side like browsing child porn
    and
    everything. that is why he removed the Hd and destroyed it.

    >
    >
    > OT3H, in a few years, when most people have changed to Vista and 7,
    > there will be loads of licenses around that no one wants, isn't that
    > likely?


    Yes but why is this f nterest to you? Don't you think you too should
    move
    to Win7 unless you have a very old PIII system like mine!

    >
    > Or at least that no one uses. Will they be selling them?


    Yes only if there are nutters and *prostitutes* like Peter Foldes
    around
    ready to buy clunkers and throw away items. They don't have pride in
    themselves.

    >
    > If I try to use that license years from now, will it warn me it's
    > still in use without screwing up the guy who was nice enough to give
    > me the computer?


    Unlikely because M$ database may not exist after 2014 ( a patch will
    be
    issued to REPLACE activation of M$ products) and it is normally wiped
    clean
    every 120 days anyway. Records older than 120 days are zapped!

    >
    > Or should I try to track him down now?


    You can do anything you want. Peter foldes has already had his d i c
    k
    removed so he can now sleep other men!
     
  5. mm

    mm Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 23:26:26 -0500, "Daave" <daave@example.com> wrote:

    >mm wrote:
    >> A friend was given a computer with XP, through a recycling list. It
    >> has the MS Certificate of Authenticity sticker, with the Product Key,
    >> on the bottom. It seems to me she intended to give him the XP
    >> license also, and he can use that number if, for example, he wants to
    >> upgrade an old computer or assemble a new computer. Do you agree?
    >>
    >> OTOH, I was given a computer, an eMachine, but without the harddrive,
    >> and it too has the XP C of A sticker on the bottom with the Product
    >> Key, but my guess is he didn't intend to give me the license, because
    >> he kept the harddrive. Do you agree? (He was moving and that's
    >> why he gave his old junk away, and that's also why I can't reach him.)

    >
    >I don't understand. The COA sticker with the Product Key *is* the
    >license.


    I didn't realize that!

    >Are you talking about insallation CDs perhaps? Retail
    >installation CDs and Generic OEM (System Builder) CDs also come with
    >Certificates of Authenticity with Product Keys.


    That's all I'd seen before. I guess I'd seen computers with COA's but
    I'd never looked behind one to see the sticker.
    >
    >With regard to the first paragraph, assuming it is an OEM license, it is
    >tied to that computer and the EULA does not permit it to be used on any
    >other PC.


    I haven't seen it, but it probably is tied to the PC. This was my
    idea, not the guy who got the free computer's.

    >With regard to the second paragraph, you can install a hard drive if you
    >wish and install XP on it; the COA sticker is proof you have the right
    >to do this. I'm not sure which method the manufacturer provided to
    >reinstall Windows with that particular PC. Perhaps the *old* hard drive
    >had a hidden recovery partition. If that is the case, you would
    >obviously need to come up with another method. :) If eMachine provided
    >a Recovery CD, that should work. Also, a generic OEM installation CD of
    >the matching type of XP (e.g., Home or Pro) -- matching the license
    >indicated on the COA sticker, that is -- will work if you use the COA
    >sticker's Product Key.


    Well, I may try that. It's actually faster than the computer I'm
    using now, 800Mhz.

    >> OT3H, in a few years, when most people have changed to Vista and 7,
    >> there will be loads of licenses around that no one wants, isn't that
    >> likely?

    >
    >Not pertinent if they are OEM licenses that have already been used.
    >Remember those licenses are not transferrable (per the EULA).


    I forgot. And when I knew, the full meaning of that didn't occur to
    me.
    >
    >> Or at least that no one uses. Will they be selling them?
    >>
    >> If I try to use that license years from now, will it warn me it's
    >> still in use without screwing up the guy who was nice enough to give
    >> me the computer?

    >
    >There won't be any warning if you are still using the same PC the nice
    >guy was using.


    You've explained that the computer had an OEM license, so he won't be
    using it after all, iiuc.

    And I can only use it on this one computer, which might work if things
    go well.

    Thanks a lot.
     
  6. mm

    mm Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 20:41:20 -0800 (PST), ANONYMOUS
    <xfsgpr@googlemail.com> wrote:

    >
    >> OT3H, in a few years, when most people have changed to Vista and 7,
    >> there will be loads of licenses around that no one wants, isn't that
    >> likely?

    >
    >Yes but why is this f nterest to you? Don't you think you too should
    >move
    >to Win7 unless you have a very old PIII system like mine!


    I probably will be. I only moved to winXP 4 months ago, and still
    have an 800 Mhz cpu.
    >
    >>
    >> Or at least that no one uses. Will they be selling them?

    >
    >Yes only if there are nutters and *prostitutes* like Peter Foldes
    >around
    >ready to buy clunkers and throw away items. They don't have pride in
    >themselves.


    I think they already are. After I read what I wrote, I checked ebay
    and I see they are already selling such things, like "GATEWAY Laptop
    memory cover with XP Home License". From what Daave says, I think
    kthat license only went with the laptop they refer to, but they're
    selling it anyhow. IIRC, there is some deal that by selling it with
    "hardware", they're (less?) illegal.

    >> If I try to use that license years from now, will it warn me it's
    >> still in use without screwing up the guy who was nice enough to give
    >> me the computer?

    >
    >Unlikely because M$ database may not exist after 2014 ( a patch will
    >be issued to REPLACE activation of M$ products) and it is normally wiped
    >clean every 120 days anyway. Records older than 120 days are zapped!


    Hmmm.
    >>
    >> Or should I try to track him down now?

    >
    >You can do anything you want. Peter foldes has already had his d i c
    >k>removed so he can now sleep other men!
    >
    >

    Thanks, and thanks to Andrew and Daave also.
     
  7. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 22:09:37 -0500, mm <NOPSAMmm2005@bigfoot.com>
    wrote:

    > A friend was given a computer with XP, through a recycling list. It
    > has the MS Certificate of Authenticity sticker, with the Product Key,
    > on the bottom. It seems to me she intended to give him the XP
    > license also, and he can use that number if, for example, he wants to
    > upgrade an old computer or assemble a new computer. Do you agree?



    No. There's only one number, and it's on that MS Certificate of
    Authenticity sticker. *That* is the license.



    > OTOH, I was given a computer, an eMachine, but without the harddrive,
    > and it too has the XP C of A sticker on the bottom with the Product
    > Key, but my guess is he didn't intend to give me the license, because
    > he kept the harddrive. Do you agree?




    No. He gave you the license.


    > (He was moving and that's
    > why he gave his old junk away, and that's also why I can't reach him.)
    >
    >
    > OT3H, in a few years, when most people have changed to Vista and 7,



    These days, not many people are changing to Vista. They are changing
    *from* Vista to Windows 7.



    > there will be loads of licenses around that no one wants, isn't that
    > likely?
    >
    > Or at least that no one uses. Will they be selling them?




    If you are talking about licenses that came with the computer (on a
    sticker on the computer) be aware that these are OEM licenses. OEM
    licenses are permanently tied to the first computer they are installed
    on, and they may never legally be moved to another. So they may *not*
    be sold.


    > If I try to use that license years from now, will it warn me it's
    > still in use without screwing up the guy who was nice enough to give
    > me the computer?



    No. You should be able to use it. The guy probably doesn't.


    > Or should I try to track him down now?
    >
    > Thanks a lot.


    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  8. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    mm wrote:
    > On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 23:26:26 -0500, "Daave" <daave@example.com> wrote:
    >
    >> mm wrote:
    >>> A friend was given a computer with XP, through a recycling list. It
    >>> has the MS Certificate of Authenticity sticker, with the Product
    >>> Key, on the bottom. It seems to me she intended to give him the XP
    >>> license also, and he can use that number if, for example, he wants
    >>> to upgrade an old computer or assemble a new computer. Do you
    >>> agree?
    >>>
    >>> OTOH, I was given a computer, an eMachine, but without the
    >>> harddrive, and it too has the XP C of A sticker on the bottom with
    >>> the Product Key, but my guess is he didn't intend to give me the
    >>> license, because he kept the harddrive. Do you agree? (He
    >>> was moving and that's why he gave his old junk away, and that's
    >>> also why I can't reach him.)

    >>
    >> I don't understand. The COA sticker with the Product Key *is* the
    >> license.

    >
    > I didn't realize that!
    >
    >> Are you talking about insallation CDs perhaps? Retail
    >> installation CDs and Generic OEM (System Builder) CDs also come with
    >> Certificates of Authenticity with Product Keys.

    >
    > That's all I'd seen before. I guess I'd seen computers with COA's but
    > I'd never looked behind one to see the sticker.


    Behind a PC or CD?

    With desktops, I've seen COA stickers on the top or on one of the sides.
    With laptops, I've seen them on the bottom or sometimes in the
    compartment where the rechargeable battery is located.

    I've never seen a Retail installation CD (that I can recall). I've seen
    lots of OEM installation CDs. Dell-branded installation CDs don't come
    with COAs (the computers themselves do, however). The COAs I have seen
    with generic OEM installation CDs are not stickers. But what I usually
    do is tape them to the PCs I install them on.

    >> With regard to the first paragraph, assuming it is an OEM license,
    >> it is tied to that computer and the EULA does not permit it to be
    >> used on any other PC.

    >
    > I haven't seen it, but it probably is tied to the PC. This was my
    > idea, not the guy who got the free computer's.


    No "probably" in this case. That is, if that PC does indeed have an OEM
    version of Windows XP installed on it, it *is* tied to the computer. So
    the Product Key associated with that license may not be used (per the
    EULA) on any other PC. This is not to say that others have never tried
    to do just that and with success. However, it is not permitted by the
    EULA.

    >> With regard to the second paragraph, you can install a hard drive if
    >> you wish and install XP on it; the COA sticker is proof you have the
    >> right to do this. I'm not sure which method the manufacturer
    >> provided to reinstall Windows with that particular PC. Perhaps the
    >> *old* hard drive had a hidden recovery partition. If that is the
    >> case, you would obviously need to come up with another method. :)
    >> If eMachine provided a Recovery CD, that should work. Also, a
    >> generic OEM installation CD of the matching type of XP (e.g., Home
    >> or Pro) -- matching the license indicated on the COA sticker, that
    >> is -- will work if you use the COA sticker's Product Key.

    >
    > Well, I may try that. It's actually faster than the computer I'm
    > using now, 800Mhz.


    Sounds like a plan. You need to determine the method eMachine provided
    to reinstall the OS. It is in the documentation that came with the PC.
    If you don't have the documentation, you should be able to find it
    online if you enter the model and model number in a search engine. If
    you can't find it, tell us the model/number, and surely someone here can
    help you with that.

    >>> OT3H, in a few years, when most people have changed to Vista and 7,
    >>> there will be loads of licenses around that no one wants, isn't that
    >>> likely?

    >>
    >> Not pertinent if they are OEM licenses that have already been used.
    >> Remember those licenses are not transferrable (per the EULA).

    >
    > I forgot. And when I knew, the full meaning of that didn't occur to
    > me.
    >>
    >>> Or at least that no one uses. Will they be selling them?
    >>>
    >>> If I try to use that license years from now, will it warn me it's
    >>> still in use without screwing up the guy who was nice enough to give
    >>> me the computer?

    >>
    >> There won't be any warning if you are still using the same PC the
    >> nice guy was using.

    >
    > You've explained that the computer had an OEM license, so he won't be
    > using it after all, iiuc.
    >
    > And I can only use it on this one computer, which might work if things
    > go well.
    >
    > Thanks a lot.


    YW.
     
  9. Bruce Chambers

    Bruce Chambers Flightless Bird

    mm wrote:
    > A friend was given a computer with XP, through a recycling list. It
    > has the MS Certificate of Authenticity sticker, with the Product Key,
    > on the bottom. It seems to me she intended to give him the XP
    > license also,....



    Whether that was intended or not is moot; the license was given to your
    friend along with the computer. When the Product Key is affixed to the
    computer, it means that it represents an OEM license, which is
    permanently bound to the first computer on which it's installed. The
    OEM license is an inseparable part of the computer. The Product Key
    /is/, for all practical purposes, the license.


    > ..... and he can use that number if, for example, he wants to
    > upgrade an old computer or assemble a new computer. Do you agree?
    >



    No. As stated above, an OEM license is *permanently* bound to the
    first computer on which it is installed. It can _never_ be legitimately
    transfered to any other computer, under _any_ circumstances.


    > OTOH, I was given a computer, an eMachine, but without the harddrive,
    > and it too has the XP C of A sticker on the bottom with the Product
    > Key, but my guess is he didn't intend to give me the license, because
    > he kept the harddrive. Do you agree?



    Not at all. Remember, the Product Key *is* the license. It might
    simply be that the hard drive had failed. Is there any particular
    reason you can't just ask?


    > (He was moving and that's
    > why he gave his old junk away, and that's also why I can't reach him.)
    >
    >


    If you already have the explanation, why ask here?


    > OT3H, in a few years, when most people have changed to Vista and 7,
    > there will be loads of licenses around that no one wants, isn't that
    > likely?
    >


    Possibly. Even probably.


    > Or at least that no one uses. Will they be selling them?
    >


    If those available licenses are retail licenses, they can be resold.
    Naturally, used OEM licenses cannot legitimately be resold.


    > If I try to use that license years from now, will it warn me it's
    > still in use without screwing up the guy who was nice enough to give
    > me the computer?
    >



    Since he gave you the license along with the computer, I don't see how
    your using it could possibly be construed as "... screwing up the guy
    who was nice enough to give me the computer."



    > Or should I try to track him down now?
    >



    If he's a friend you want to stay in touch with, go ahead and track him
    down, if you like. Otherwise, your conscience can be clear.



    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     
  10. Bruce Chambers

    Bruce Chambers Flightless Bird

    Andrew E. wrote:
    > Well that certificate is from the mfg,not microsoft,the multi-license is
    > for that machine only,not transferable.Also,its been registered to another
    > person (registered at thier home/office,with a specific
    > name,adress,tele-phone
    > nos,etc).Same with other pcs that have been pitched,for 1 reason or another.
    > You'd need alot more verifiable data to simply re-use the license,microsoft
    > does
    > keep very good records...
    >



    Forgot to take your meds, again? Where /do/ you come up with such
    nonsense?

    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     
  11. Doum

    Doum Flightless Bird

    "Daave" <daave@example.com> écrivait news:uNhDHRcoKHA.5696
    @TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl:

    <snip>
    >
    > I've never seen a Retail installation CD (that I can recall). I've seen
    > lots of OEM installation CDs. Dell-branded installation CDs don't come
    > with COAs (the computers themselves do, however). The COAs I have seen
    > with generic OEM installation CDs are not stickers. But what I usually
    > do is tape them to the PCs I install them on.
    >

    <snip>

    The COAs I have seen with generic OEM installation packages ARE stickers,
    you separate them from the package with a thin blade, you can then apply
    them on the PC case and they will hold by themselves, no tape needed.
     
  12. mm

    mm Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 31 Jan 2010 10:17:12 -0700, Bruce Chambers
    <bchambers@cable0ne.n3t> wrote:

    >
    >They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    >safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin


    I'm sure when Ben Franklin said this, it was appropriate and worth
    saying.

    But in general, it's not true. Everyone except criminals deserve
    both liberty and safety, and if one is forced to choose one over the
    other, even if makes what others consider a bad choice, even if he
    makes what he later considers a bad choice, he still deserves both.
     
  13. mm

    mm Flightless Bird

    On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 10:52:48 -0500, "Daave" <daave@example.com> wrote:

    >mm wrote:
    >> On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 23:26:26 -0500, "Daave" <daave@example.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> mm wrote:
    >>>> A friend was given a computer with XP, through a recycling list. It
    >>>> has the MS Certificate of Authenticity sticker, with the Product
    >>>> Key, on the bottom. It seems to me she intended to give him the XP
    >>>> license also, and he can use that number if, for example, he wants
    >>>> to upgrade an old computer or assemble a new computer. Do you
    >>>> agree?
    >>>>
    >>>> OTOH, I was given a computer, an eMachine, but without the
    >>>> harddrive, and it too has the XP C of A sticker on the bottom with
    >>>> the Product Key, but my guess is he didn't intend to give me the
    >>>> license, because he kept the harddrive. Do you agree? (He
    >>>> was moving and that's why he gave his old junk away, and that's
    >>>> also why I can't reach him.)
    >>>
    >>> I don't understand. The COA sticker with the Product Key *is* the
    >>> license.

    >>
    >> I didn't realize that!
    >>
    >>> Are you talking about insallation CDs perhaps? Retail
    >>> installation CDs and Generic OEM (System Builder) CDs also come with
    >>> Certificates of Authenticity with Product Keys.

    >>
    >> That's all I'd seen before. I guess I'd seen computers with COA's but
    >> I'd never looked behind one to see the sticker.

    >
    >Behind a PC or CD?


    Behind a PC.
    >
    >With desktops, I've seen COA stickers on the top or on one of the sides.
    >With laptops, I've seen them on the bottom or sometimes in the
    >compartment where the rechargeable battery is located.


    I guess I don't really see that many computers, and I don't pay much
    attention when I do. ;(

    >I've never seen a Retail installation CD (that I can recall). I've seen
    >lots of OEM installation CDs. Dell-branded installation CDs don't come
    >with COAs (the computers themselves do, however). The COAs I have seen
    >with generic OEM installation CDs are not stickers. But what I usually
    >do is tape them to the PCs I install them on.


    That's a good idea.

    >>> With regard to the first paragraph, assuming it is an OEM license,
    >>> it is tied to that computer and the EULA does not permit it to be
    >>> used on any other PC.

    >>
    >> I haven't seen it, but it probably is tied to the PC. This was my
    >> idea, not the guy who got the free computer's.

    >
    >No "probably" in this case. That is, if that PC does indeed have an OEM
    >version of Windows XP installed on it, it *is* tied to the computer. So


    What I meant was it proably has an OEM version of XP on it. It's
    probably not a win2000 or 98 computer that was upgraded to XP with a
    retail CD. But I haven't seen it an my friend is a recent refugee
    from Macintosh.

    >the Product Key associated with that license may not be used (per the
    >EULA) on any other PC. This is not to say that others have never tried
    >to do just that and with success. However, it is not permitted by the
    >EULA.
    >
    >>> With regard to the second paragraph, you can install a hard drive if
    >>> you wish and install XP on it; the COA sticker is proof you have the
    >>> right to do this. I'm not sure which method the manufacturer
    >>> provided to reinstall Windows with that particular PC. Perhaps the
    >>> *old* hard drive had a hidden recovery partition. If that is the
    >>> case, you would obviously need to come up with another method. :)
    >>> If eMachine provided a Recovery CD, that should work. Also, a
    >>> generic OEM installation CD of the matching type of XP (e.g., Home
    >>> or Pro) -- matching the license indicated on the COA sticker, that
    >>> is -- will work if you use the COA sticker's Product Key.

    >>
    >> Well, I may try that. It's actually faster than the computer I'm
    >> using now, 800Mhz.

    >
    >Sounds like a plan. You need to determine the method eMachine provided
    >to reinstall the OS. It is in the documentation that came with the PC.
    >If you don't have the documentation, you should be able to find it
    >online if you enter the model and model number in a search engine. If


    That sounds like a plan. I'll probably start on that tomorrow.

    >you can't find it, tell us the model/number, and surely someone here can
    >help you with that.


    Thank you.

    >>>> OT3H, in a few years, when most people have changed to Vista and 7,
    >>>> there will be loads of licenses around that no one wants, isn't that
    >>>> likely?
    >>>
    >>> Not pertinent if they are OEM licenses that have already been used.
    >>> Remember those licenses are not transferrable (per the EULA).

    >>
    >> I forgot. And when I knew, the full meaning of that didn't occur to
    >> me.
    >>>
    >>>> Or at least that no one uses. Will they be selling them?
    >>>>
    >>>> If I try to use that license years from now, will it warn me it's
    >>>> still in use without screwing up the guy who was nice enough to give
    >>>> me the computer?
    >>>
    >>> There won't be any warning if you are still using the same PC the
    >>> nice guy was using.

    >>
    >> You've explained that the computer had an OEM license, so he won't be
    >> using it after all, iiuc.
    >>
    >> And I can only use it on this one computer, which might work if things
    >> go well.


    BTW, as you could tell maybe from my first questions, this didn't turn
    out anything like I thought it would. My friend has less than I
    thought he would have (though he's not complaining at all, and doesn't
    even know what I incorrectly thought) and I may have more than I
    thought I did. Well I do have more and I may be able to make use of
    it. (My computer is 800 Mhz and the one without the harddrive is
    about 2300.)

    Thanks again.

    >> Thanks a lot.

    >
    >YW.
    >
     
  14. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    mm wrote:
    > BTW, as you could tell maybe from my first questions, this didn't turn
    > out anything like I thought it would. My friend has less than I
    > thought he would have (though he's not complaining at all, and doesn't
    > even know what I incorrectly thought) and I may have more than I
    > thought I did. Well I do have more and I may be able to make use of
    > it. (My computer is 800 Mhz and the one without the harddrive is
    > about 2300.)
    >
    > Thanks again.


    YW.
     

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