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CD for updates?

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Merril, May 1, 2010.

  1. Merril

    Merril Flightless Bird

    Hi there,

    We'd like to re-install our Windows 2000 onto a relative's computer, since
    she is using ME and we are here already upgraded to XP.

    She only has dialup access, so I'd like to collect the needed updates and
    burn them (here) to a CD/DVD for installation on her computer after the
    Windows 2000 Professional is installed.

    May I ask for your help, please:

    1) What updates should be installed to bring the Windows 2000 installation
    completely up-to-date?

    2) Where can these updates be downloaded? Is there one site where they can
    all be downloaded, or are they scattered all over the microsoft.com site?

    3) In what order should the updates be installed?

    4) Are there any issues with an upgrade from ME to 2000? Should we save all
    important personal data such as photos, music, documents etc. and do a
    reformat and clean install? How to preserve email and its folder structure
    as well as browser favorites and settings?
     
  2. Kathy Taylor

    Kathy Taylor Flightless Bird

    Merril wrote:
    > Hi there,
    >
    > We'd like to re-install our Windows 2000 onto a relative's computer, since
    > she is using ME and we are here already upgraded to XP.
    >
    > She only has dialup access, so I'd like to collect the needed updates and
    > burn them (here) to a CD/DVD for installation on her computer after the
    > Windows 2000 Professional is installed.
    >
    > May I ask for your help, please:
    >
    > 1) What updates should be installed to bring the Windows 2000 installation
    > completely up-to-date?
    >
    > 2) Where can these updates be downloaded? Is there one site where they can
    > all be downloaded, or are they scattered all over the microsoft.com site?
    >
    > 3) In what order should the updates be installed?
    >
    > 4) Are there any issues with an upgrade from ME to 2000? Should we save all
    > important personal data such as photos, music, documents etc. and do a
    > reformat and clean install? How to preserve email and its folder structure
    > as well as browser favorites and settings?
    >
    >

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/...CF-8850-4531-B52B-BF28B324C662&displaylang=en

    Do a clean install after backing up all the important data. You really
    want Windows 2000 to be in NTFS, not FAT32.

    --

    Kathy Taylor
     
  3. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Merril wrote:
    > Hi there,
    >
    > We'd like to re-install our Windows 2000 onto a relative's computer, since
    > she is using ME and we are here already upgraded to XP.
    >
    > She only has dialup access, so I'd like to collect the needed updates and
    > burn them (here) to a CD/DVD for installation on her computer after the
    > Windows 2000 Professional is installed.
    >
    > May I ask for your help, please:
    >
    > 1) What updates should be installed to bring the Windows 2000 installation
    > completely up-to-date?
    >
    > 2) Where can these updates be downloaded? Is there one site where they can
    > all be downloaded, or are they scattered all over the microsoft.com site?
    >
    > 3) In what order should the updates be installed?
    >
    > 4) Are there any issues with an upgrade from ME to 2000? Should we save all
    > important personal data such as photos, music, documents etc. and do a
    > reformat and clean install? How to preserve email and its folder structure
    > as well as browser favorites and settings?
    >
    >


    You should also look at a few items at the bottom of the page Kathy provided
    as well. For example "Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 Network Install for IT Professionals"
    could be a relatively big download, which is a complete SP4 (W2KSP4_EN.EXE
    is the one I have in my collection here, 135,477,136 bytes).

    First, you'd examine your Win2K CD, to see what Service Pack it is at. My CD might
    have been at SP2, and then I install SP4 after that.

    The last Service Pack for Win2K was SP4. That was followed by Update Rollup 1 (version2),
    which Kathy provided a link for. You could also update Internet Explorer.
    The IE6 SP1 link at the bottom of that download page might be useful. I think
    I had at least one other piece of common software, for my Win2K SP4+Rollup machine,
    that insisted that I update IE, so I think I couldn't continue to use the version
    of IE that came on the installer CD or Service Pack. That wasn't really enough.
    There are even some web sites now, that complain about IE6, but there really
    isn't always a choice about that. (You could always download a copy of Firefox
    and take that along with you. Maybe Opera would work as well.)

    Win2K + SP4 + Rollup1 + IE6SP1 or later

    There is a trick to the IE6SP1. The download for it, is a tiny file, and
    it'll attempt to do a network install. Since you're carting a CD along
    with you, you don't want that. There is a way to trick the setup, to
    "staging" the install, such that the tiny setup file, will download
    all the files into a directory. I have a directory here, that contains
    all the components of IE6SP1 (at least, enough components for me to do
    an install of it). The installer then doesn't have to go to
    the network, as long as all the component parts are in the same folder.
    My folder seems to be about 12MB in size, so there might still be some
    bits and pieces not present there. But at least that is not 12MB you'd have
    to do over dialup. The recipe for doing this, is here. This tells you
    how to get the necessary files, into your folder, and then you can
    throw that folder onto your new CD. I think the copy of Acrobat Reader
    I'm using, insists on updating IE.

    http://www.updatexp.com/download-ie6.html

    While IE6SP1 may sound "final", apparently there is a rollup package
    for IE6SP1 on top of that as well. I probably did that one here, via Windows Update.
    I don't think that is in my junk folder.

    According to this, IE6 SP1 is the end of the road for Win2K. See the
    table about 70% of the way down this web page. I don't think the
    newer ones can be installed.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_explorer

    After that is done, you'd be looking to Windows Update, for Security updates.
    You can do that over dialup. I expect there are quite a few of those,
    because those would come after the rollup, and the rollup is dated 2005.

    I think someone mentioned, that support for Win2K is just about done.
    So your plan to do the installation now, is perfectly timed. Make sure
    you complete all the Security updates, before you walk away from the
    relative's computer. Don't tell them "we'll do it next week", because
    the end of support might not be too far away.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_2000

    "Extended Support Period until 13 July 2010"

    I think I've seen the odd web page, that had a complete list
    of the security updates for some of the Windows OSes. I don't
    seem to have a bookmark for that. There is probably a site that
    has all of them, maybe downloadable as a torrent or the like.
    Such a list, might give you some idea how long a Windows Update
    session might last for your installation project.

    One way to test the completeness of your collection, is to do
    a test install on your existing machine. That way, when you
    think you're done, you can go to Windows Update, and see just
    how many things you missed. That might save some grief when
    you get to the relative's machine and find you still have
    many megabytes to go. I maintain a relative's computer, and
    the time I spend there, is never enough to keep the machine
    up to date over dialup. I can only run Windows Update, after
    everyone has gone to bed and the phone line is free.

    To do test installs here, I have about five spare hard drives
    of one sort or another. I unplug the existing drive, plug in
    an empty drive, and do an install on it. In cases where I
    don't want to "activate", I might remain disconnected from the
    network, while messing about. I use test installs for quick tests
    of various things, where the install will be thrown away later
    in the day. I can erase the drive later, by using a Linux LiveCD
    and running the program "dd" and erasing just the first sector
    of the disk. That is the quickest way to make the disk look completely
    empty, to the next installation experiment. For example, you
    could use something like a Ubuntu CD, to boot and erase your
    test install with a command like this (where you've verified
    the address of the disk is actually "hda" and not something
    else). This is enough to make a disk look empty, instantly.

    dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda bs=512 count=1

    I see you've also posted in microsoft.public.win2000.general
    and you may get more help there.

    HTH,
    Paul
     
  4. LVTravel

    LVTravel Flightless Bird

    "Merril" <merryl@example.com> wrote in message
    news:8435hfFcnpU1@mid.individual.net...
    > Hi there,
    >
    > We'd like to re-install our Windows 2000 onto a relative's computer, since
    > she is using ME and we are here already upgraded to XP.
    >
    > She only has dialup access, so I'd like to collect the needed updates and
    > burn them (here) to a CD/DVD for installation on her computer after the
    > Windows 2000 Professional is installed.
    >
    > May I ask for your help, please:
    >
    > 1) What updates should be installed to bring the Windows 2000 installation
    > completely up-to-date?
    >
    > 2) Where can these updates be downloaded? Is there one site where they can
    > all be downloaded, or are they scattered all over the microsoft.com site?
    >
    > 3) In what order should the updates be installed?
    >
    > 4) Are there any issues with an upgrade from ME to 2000? Should we save
    > all
    > important personal data such as photos, music, documents etc. and do a
    > reformat and clean install? How to preserve email and its folder structure
    > as well as browser favorites and settings?
    >
    >


    You received some good advice and here is some more:

    Ensure that all devices on the computer has Win 2K drivers available.
    Download them from either the computer manufacturer or the individual device
    manufacturer's web site. These should include at a minimum the motherboard,
    video, sound, modem drivers. Remember that Win 2000 is an NT version
    operating system and ME was a DOS based system. They are entirely different
    operating systems but do work similarly. You need to do a clean install for
    reliability even if it will upgrade but I would doubt that it will upgrade.
    If it is an OEM disk I know it won't upgrade only do a clean install. Save
    all data files off drive prior to installing.

    If the Win 2K was an OEM (for sale with a new PC or similar on the disc or
    came with your computer) version "legally" it can not be installed onto
    another computer as OEM dies with the first device it is installed onto.
    Can you install it, probably.
     
  5. Merril

    Merril Flightless Bird

    Thank you, but I'm unable to find any reply from a "Kathy" at
    http://groups.google.com/groups/sea...xp.general&as_usubject=&as_uauthors=&safe=off
    or on my server.

    I'll keep looking until the reply appears.

    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:hrhume$pjn$1@speranza.aioe.org...
    > Merril wrote:
    > > Hi there,
    > >
    > > We'd like to re-install our Windows 2000 onto a relative's computer,

    since
    > > she is using ME and we are here already upgraded to XP.
    > >
    > > She only has dialup access, so I'd like to collect the needed updates

    and
    > > burn them (here) to a CD/DVD for installation on her computer after the
    > > Windows 2000 Professional is installed.
    > >
    > > May I ask for your help, please:
    > >
    > > 1) What updates should be installed to bring the Windows 2000

    installation
    > > completely up-to-date?
    > >
    > > 2) Where can these updates be downloaded? Is there one site where they

    can
    > > all be downloaded, or are they scattered all over the microsoft.com

    site?
    > >
    > > 3) In what order should the updates be installed?
    > >
    > > 4) Are there any issues with an upgrade from ME to 2000? Should we save

    all
    > > important personal data such as photos, music, documents etc. and do a
    > > reformat and clean install? How to preserve email and its folder

    structure
    > > as well as browser favorites and settings?
    > >
    > >

    >
    > You should also look at a few items at the bottom of the page Kathy

    provided
    > as well. For example "Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 Network Install for IT

    Professionals"
    > could be a relatively big download, which is a complete SP4 (W2KSP4_EN.EXE
    > is the one I have in my collection here, 135,477,136 bytes).
    >
    > First, you'd examine your Win2K CD, to see what Service Pack it is at. My

    CD might
    > have been at SP2, and then I install SP4 after that.
    >
    > The last Service Pack for Win2K was SP4. That was followed by Update

    Rollup 1 (version2),
    > which Kathy provided a link for. You could also update Internet Explorer.
    > The IE6 SP1 link at the bottom of that download page might be useful. I

    think
    > I had at least one other piece of common software, for my Win2K SP4+Rollup

    machine,
    > that insisted that I update IE, so I think I couldn't continue to use the

    version
    > of IE that came on the installer CD or Service Pack. That wasn't really

    enough.
    > There are even some web sites now, that complain about IE6, but there

    really
    > isn't always a choice about that. (You could always download a copy of

    Firefox
    > and take that along with you. Maybe Opera would work as well.)
    >
    > Win2K + SP4 + Rollup1 + IE6SP1 or later
    >
    > There is a trick to the IE6SP1. The download for it, is a tiny file, and
    > it'll attempt to do a network install. Since you're carting a CD along
    > with you, you don't want that. There is a way to trick the setup, to
    > "staging" the install, such that the tiny setup file, will download
    > all the files into a directory. I have a directory here, that contains
    > all the components of IE6SP1 (at least, enough components for me to do
    > an install of it). The installer then doesn't have to go to
    > the network, as long as all the component parts are in the same folder.
    > My folder seems to be about 12MB in size, so there might still be some
    > bits and pieces not present there. But at least that is not 12MB you'd

    have
    > to do over dialup. The recipe for doing this, is here. This tells you
    > how to get the necessary files, into your folder, and then you can
    > throw that folder onto your new CD. I think the copy of Acrobat Reader
    > I'm using, insists on updating IE.
    >
    > http://www.updatexp.com/download-ie6.html
    >
    > While IE6SP1 may sound "final", apparently there is a rollup package
    > for IE6SP1 on top of that as well. I probably did that one here, via

    Windows Update.
    > I don't think that is in my junk folder.
    >
    > According to this, IE6 SP1 is the end of the road for Win2K. See the
    > table about 70% of the way down this web page. I don't think the
    > newer ones can be installed.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_explorer
    >
    > After that is done, you'd be looking to Windows Update, for Security

    updates.
    > You can do that over dialup. I expect there are quite a few of those,
    > because those would come after the rollup, and the rollup is dated 2005.
    >
    > I think someone mentioned, that support for Win2K is just about done.
    > So your plan to do the installation now, is perfectly timed. Make sure
    > you complete all the Security updates, before you walk away from the
    > relative's computer. Don't tell them "we'll do it next week", because
    > the end of support might not be too far away.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_2000
    >
    > "Extended Support Period until 13 July 2010"
    >
    > I think I've seen the odd web page, that had a complete list
    > of the security updates for some of the Windows OSes. I don't
    > seem to have a bookmark for that. There is probably a site that
    > has all of them, maybe downloadable as a torrent or the like.
    > Such a list, might give you some idea how long a Windows Update
    > session might last for your installation project.
    >
    > One way to test the completeness of your collection, is to do
    > a test install on your existing machine. That way, when you
    > think you're done, you can go to Windows Update, and see just
    > how many things you missed. That might save some grief when
    > you get to the relative's machine and find you still have
    > many megabytes to go. I maintain a relative's computer, and
    > the time I spend there, is never enough to keep the machine
    > up to date over dialup. I can only run Windows Update, after
    > everyone has gone to bed and the phone line is free.
    >
    > To do test installs here, I have about five spare hard drives
    > of one sort or another. I unplug the existing drive, plug in
    > an empty drive, and do an install on it. In cases where I
    > don't want to "activate", I might remain disconnected from the
    > network, while messing about. I use test installs for quick tests
    > of various things, where the install will be thrown away later
    > in the day. I can erase the drive later, by using a Linux LiveCD
    > and running the program "dd" and erasing just the first sector
    > of the disk. That is the quickest way to make the disk look completely
    > empty, to the next installation experiment. For example, you
    > could use something like a Ubuntu CD, to boot and erase your
    > test install with a command like this (where you've verified
    > the address of the disk is actually "hda" and not something
    > else). This is enough to make a disk look empty, instantly.
    >
    > dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda bs=512 count=1
    >
    > I see you've also posted in microsoft.public.win2000.general
    > and you may get more help there.
    >
    > HTH,
    > Paul
     
  6. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Merril wrote:
    > Thank you, but I'm unable to find any reply from a "Kathy" at
    > http://groups.google.com/groups/sea...xp.general&as_usubject=&as_uauthors=&safe=off
    > or on my server.
    >
    > I'll keep looking until the reply appears.
    >


    I don't know what's up with Google right now.

    I can see the thread here.

    http://www.microsoft.com/communitie...06-b61a-9652c877e204&cat=&lang=&cr=&sloc=&p=3

    The link Kathy provided is this one.

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/...CF-8850-4531-B52B-BF28B324C662&displaylang=en

    Paul
     
  7. Michael

    Michael Flightless Bird

    Here's Kathy's response, and get a real newsreader!

    "http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=B54730CF-8850-4531-B52B-BF28B324C662&displaylang=en

    Do a clean install after backing up all the important data. You really
    want Windows 2000 to be in NTFS, not FAT32.

    --

    Kathy Taylor"

    --


    "Don't pick a fight with an old man.
    If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you."


    "Merril" <merryl@example.com> wrote in message
    news:844rcnF4pqU1@mid.individual.net...
    > Thank you, but I'm unable to find any reply from a "Kathy" at
    > http://groups.google.com/groups/sea...xp.general&as_usubject=&as_uauthors=&safe=off
    > or on my server.
    >
    > I'll keep looking until the reply appears.
    >
    > "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    > news:hrhume$pjn$1@speranza.aioe.org...
    >> Merril wrote:
    >> > Hi there,
    >> >
    >> > We'd like to re-install our Windows 2000 onto a relative's computer,

    > since
    >> > she is using ME and we are here already upgraded to XP.
    >> >
    >> > She only has dialup access, so I'd like to collect the needed updates

    > and
    >> > burn them (here) to a CD/DVD for installation on her computer after the
    >> > Windows 2000 Professional is installed.
    >> >
    >> > May I ask for your help, please:
    >> >
    >> > 1) What updates should be installed to bring the Windows 2000

    > installation
    >> > completely up-to-date?
    >> >
    >> > 2) Where can these updates be downloaded? Is there one site where they

    > can
    >> > all be downloaded, or are they scattered all over the microsoft.com

    > site?
    >> >
    >> > 3) In what order should the updates be installed?
    >> >
    >> > 4) Are there any issues with an upgrade from ME to 2000? Should we save

    > all
    >> > important personal data such as photos, music, documents etc. and do a
    >> > reformat and clean install? How to preserve email and its folder

    > structure
    >> > as well as browser favorites and settings?
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >> You should also look at a few items at the bottom of the page Kathy

    > provided
    >> as well. For example "Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 Network Install for IT

    > Professionals"
    >> could be a relatively big download, which is a complete SP4
    >> (W2KSP4_EN.EXE
    >> is the one I have in my collection here, 135,477,136 bytes).
    >>
    >> First, you'd examine your Win2K CD, to see what Service Pack it is at. My

    > CD might
    >> have been at SP2, and then I install SP4 after that.
    >>
    >> The last Service Pack for Win2K was SP4. That was followed by Update

    > Rollup 1 (version2),
    >> which Kathy provided a link for. You could also update Internet Explorer.
    >> The IE6 SP1 link at the bottom of that download page might be useful. I

    > think
    >> I had at least one other piece of common software, for my Win2K
    >> SP4+Rollup

    > machine,
    >> that insisted that I update IE, so I think I couldn't continue to use the

    > version
    >> of IE that came on the installer CD or Service Pack. That wasn't really

    > enough.
    >> There are even some web sites now, that complain about IE6, but there

    > really
    >> isn't always a choice about that. (You could always download a copy of

    > Firefox
    >> and take that along with you. Maybe Opera would work as well.)
    >>
    >> Win2K + SP4 + Rollup1 + IE6SP1 or later
    >>
    >> There is a trick to the IE6SP1. The download for it, is a tiny file, and
    >> it'll attempt to do a network install. Since you're carting a CD along
    >> with you, you don't want that. There is a way to trick the setup, to
    >> "staging" the install, such that the tiny setup file, will download
    >> all the files into a directory. I have a directory here, that contains
    >> all the components of IE6SP1 (at least, enough components for me to do
    >> an install of it). The installer then doesn't have to go to
    >> the network, as long as all the component parts are in the same folder.
    >> My folder seems to be about 12MB in size, so there might still be some
    >> bits and pieces not present there. But at least that is not 12MB you'd

    > have
    >> to do over dialup. The recipe for doing this, is here. This tells you
    >> how to get the necessary files, into your folder, and then you can
    >> throw that folder onto your new CD. I think the copy of Acrobat Reader
    >> I'm using, insists on updating IE.
    >>
    >> http://www.updatexp.com/download-ie6.html
    >>
    >> While IE6SP1 may sound "final", apparently there is a rollup package
    >> for IE6SP1 on top of that as well. I probably did that one here, via

    > Windows Update.
    >> I don't think that is in my junk folder.
    >>
    >> According to this, IE6 SP1 is the end of the road for Win2K. See the
    >> table about 70% of the way down this web page. I don't think the
    >> newer ones can be installed.
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_explorer
    >>
    >> After that is done, you'd be looking to Windows Update, for Security

    > updates.
    >> You can do that over dialup. I expect there are quite a few of those,
    >> because those would come after the rollup, and the rollup is dated 2005.
    >>
    >> I think someone mentioned, that support for Win2K is just about done.
    >> So your plan to do the installation now, is perfectly timed. Make sure
    >> you complete all the Security updates, before you walk away from the
    >> relative's computer. Don't tell them "we'll do it next week", because
    >> the end of support might not be too far away.
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_2000
    >>
    >> "Extended Support Period until 13 July 2010"
    >>
    >> I think I've seen the odd web page, that had a complete list
    >> of the security updates for some of the Windows OSes. I don't
    >> seem to have a bookmark for that. There is probably a site that
    >> has all of them, maybe downloadable as a torrent or the like.
    >> Such a list, might give you some idea how long a Windows Update
    >> session might last for your installation project.
    >>
    >> One way to test the completeness of your collection, is to do
    >> a test install on your existing machine. That way, when you
    >> think you're done, you can go to Windows Update, and see just
    >> how many things you missed. That might save some grief when
    >> you get to the relative's machine and find you still have
    >> many megabytes to go. I maintain a relative's computer, and
    >> the time I spend there, is never enough to keep the machine
    >> up to date over dialup. I can only run Windows Update, after
    >> everyone has gone to bed and the phone line is free.
    >>
    >> To do test installs here, I have about five spare hard drives
    >> of one sort or another. I unplug the existing drive, plug in
    >> an empty drive, and do an install on it. In cases where I
    >> don't want to "activate", I might remain disconnected from the
    >> network, while messing about. I use test installs for quick tests
    >> of various things, where the install will be thrown away later
    >> in the day. I can erase the drive later, by using a Linux LiveCD
    >> and running the program "dd" and erasing just the first sector
    >> of the disk. That is the quickest way to make the disk look completely
    >> empty, to the next installation experiment. For example, you
    >> could use something like a Ubuntu CD, to boot and erase your
    >> test install with a command like this (where you've verified
    >> the address of the disk is actually "hda" and not something
    >> else). This is enough to make a disk look empty, instantly.
    >>
    >> dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda bs=512 count=1
    >>
    >> I see you've also posted in microsoft.public.win2000.general
    >> and you may get more help there.
    >>
    >> HTH,
    >> Paul

    >
    >
     

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