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Can't run PageDefrag in Windows 7

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by Dave \Crash\ Dummy, Jul 7, 2010.

  1. Dave \Crash\ Dummy

    Dave \Crash\ Dummy Flightless Bird

    I am running 64 bit Windows 7 Ultimate, logged on with administrator
    privileges. When I try to run pagedfrg.exe as administrator, I get this
    error.

    http://crash.thedatalist.com/temp/snapshot.htm

    I have tried "Troubleshoot compatibility" to no avail.
    I have the latest version of PageDefrag available on the Microsoft site,
    version 2.32.

    --
    Crash

    One man's weed is another man's wildflower.
     
  2. Chuck

    Chuck Flightless Bird

    On 7/7/2010 12:35 PM, Dave "Crash" Dummy wrote:
    > I am running 64 bit Windows 7 Ultimate, logged on with administrator
    > privileges. When I try to run pagedfrg.exe as administrator, I get this
    > error.
    >
    > http://crash.thedatalist.com/temp/snapshot.htm
    >
    > I have tried "Troubleshoot compatibility" to no avail.
    > I have the latest version of PageDefrag available on the Microsoft site,
    > version 2.32.
    >

    I believe that your version runs on 32bit, not 64. At least that's what
    the MS description indicates. I didn't see a version for 64bit.
     
  3. Dave \Crash\ Dummy

    Dave \Crash\ Dummy Flightless Bird

    Chuck wrote:
    > On 7/7/2010 12:35 PM, Dave "Crash" Dummy wrote:
    >> I am running 64 bit Windows 7 Ultimate, logged on with
    >> administrator privileges. When I try to run pagedfrg.exe as
    >> administrator, I get this error.
    >>
    >> http://crash.thedatalist.com/temp/snapshot.htm
    >>
    >> I have tried "Troubleshoot compatibility" to no avail. I have the
    >> latest version of PageDefrag available on the Microsoft site,
    >> version 2.32.
    >>

    > I believe that your version runs on 32bit, not 64. At least that's
    > what the MS description indicates. I didn't see a version for 64bit.


    Bummer. I thought the compatibility troubleshooter would fix that by
    running it in XP mode. :-(
    --
    Crash

    "When you get to a fork in the road, take it."
    ~ Yogi Berra ~
     
  4. Jeff Layman

    Jeff Layman Flightless Bird

    "Dave "Crash" Dummy" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    news:SP3Zn.16292$dx7.6920@newsfe21.iad...
    > Chuck wrote:
    >> On 7/7/2010 12:35 PM, Dave "Crash" Dummy wrote:
    >>> I am running 64 bit Windows 7 Ultimate, logged on with
    >>> administrator privileges. When I try to run pagedfrg.exe as
    >>> administrator, I get this error.
    >>>
    >>> http://crash.thedatalist.com/temp/snapshot.htm
    >>>
    >>> I have tried "Troubleshoot compatibility" to no avail. I have the
    >>> latest version of PageDefrag available on the Microsoft site, version
    >>> 2.32.
    >>>

    >> I believe that your version runs on 32bit, not 64. At least that's
    >> what the MS description indicates. I didn't see a version for 64bit.

    >
    > Bummer. I thought the compatibility troubleshooter would fix that by
    > running it in XP mode. :-(
    > --
    > Crash


    Wouldn't you get more or less the same effect as defragging by setting the
    pagefile size to a minimum (16Mb with my laptop), rebooting, then setting
    the pagefile to the size you want, and rebooting again? I assume that Win7
    would have to create space on the disk for the new pagefile, and that space
    would be a completely defragmented pagefile.

    --

    Jeff
     
  5. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Wed, 7 Jul 2010 21:11:15 +0100, "Jeff Layman"
    <jmlayman@invalid.invalid> wrote:

    > "Dave "Crash" Dummy" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:SP3Zn.16292$dx7.6920@newsfe21.iad...
    > > Chuck wrote:
    > >> On 7/7/2010 12:35 PM, Dave "Crash" Dummy wrote:
    > >>> I am running 64 bit Windows 7 Ultimate, logged on with
    > >>> administrator privileges. When I try to run pagedfrg.exe as
    > >>> administrator, I get this error.
    > >>>
    > >>> http://crash.thedatalist.com/temp/snapshot.htm
    > >>>
    > >>> I have tried "Troubleshoot compatibility" to no avail. I have the
    > >>> latest version of PageDefrag available on the Microsoft site, version
    > >>> 2.32.
    > >>>
    > >> I believe that your version runs on 32bit, not 64. At least that's
    > >> what the MS description indicates. I didn't see a version for 64bit.

    > >
    > > Bummer. I thought the compatibility troubleshooter would fix that by
    > > running it in XP mode. :-(
    > > --
    > > Crash

    >
    > Wouldn't you get more or less the same effect as defragging by setting the
    > pagefile size to a minimum (16Mb with my laptop), rebooting, then setting
    > the pagefile to the size you want, and rebooting again? I assume that Win7
    > would have to create space on the disk for the new pagefile, and that space
    > would be a completely defragmented pagefile.



    Fragmentation of the page file is really a non-issue. Since access to
    the page file is random, it doesn't really matter at all if it's
    fragmented.
     
  6. Mr2U

    Mr2U Flightless Bird

    <snip>
    >Fragmentation of the page file is really a non-issue. Since access to
    >the page file is random, it doesn't really matter at all if it's
    >fragmented.


    MS wrote a utilty to address a non-issue?
     
  7. Dave \Crash\ Dummy

    Dave \Crash\ Dummy Flightless Bird

    Ken Blake wrote:
    > On Wed, 7 Jul 2010 21:11:15 +0100, "Jeff Layman"
    > <jmlayman@invalid.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >> "Dave "Crash" Dummy" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    >> news:SP3Zn.16292$dx7.6920@newsfe21.iad...
    >>> Chuck wrote:
    >>>> On 7/7/2010 12:35 PM, Dave "Crash" Dummy wrote:
    >>>>> I am running 64 bit Windows 7 Ultimate, logged on with
    >>>>> administrator privileges. When I try to run pagedfrg.exe as
    >>>>> administrator, I get this error.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> http://crash.thedatalist.com/temp/snapshot.htm
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I have tried "Troubleshoot compatibility" to no avail. I have the
    >>>>> latest version of PageDefrag available on the Microsoft site, version
    >>>>> 2.32.
    >>>>>
    >>>> I believe that your version runs on 32bit, not 64. At least that's
    >>>> what the MS description indicates. I didn't see a version for 64bit.
    >>> Bummer. I thought the compatibility troubleshooter would fix that by
    >>> running it in XP mode. :-(
    >>> --
    >>> Crash

    >> Wouldn't you get more or less the same effect as defragging by setting the
    >> pagefile size to a minimum (16Mb with my laptop), rebooting, then setting
    >> the pagefile to the size you want, and rebooting again? I assume that Win7
    >> would have to create space on the disk for the new pagefile, and that space
    >> would be a completely defragmented pagefile.

    >
    >
    > Fragmentation of the page file is really a non-issue. Since access to
    > the page file is random, it doesn't really matter at all if it's
    > fragmented.
    >

    I am more interested in defragging the registry than the pagefile.
    --
    Crash

    "The fewer the facts, the stronger the opinion."
    ~ Arnold H. Glasow ~
     
  8. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Wed, 07 Jul 2010 19:29:17 -0400, "Dave \"Crash\" Dummy"
    <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote:

    > Ken Blake wrote:
    > > On Wed, 7 Jul 2010 21:11:15 +0100, "Jeff Layman"
    > > <jmlayman@invalid.invalid> wrote:
    > >
    > >> "Dave "Crash" Dummy" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    > >> news:SP3Zn.16292$dx7.6920@newsfe21.iad...
    > >>> Chuck wrote:
    > >>>> On 7/7/2010 12:35 PM, Dave "Crash" Dummy wrote:
    > >>>>> I am running 64 bit Windows 7 Ultimate, logged on with
    > >>>>> administrator privileges. When I try to run pagedfrg.exe as
    > >>>>> administrator, I get this error.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>> http://crash.thedatalist.com/temp/snapshot.htm
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>> I have tried "Troubleshoot compatibility" to no avail. I have the
    > >>>>> latest version of PageDefrag available on the Microsoft site, version
    > >>>>> 2.32.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>> I believe that your version runs on 32bit, not 64. At least that's
    > >>>> what the MS description indicates. I didn't see a version for 64bit.
    > >>> Bummer. I thought the compatibility troubleshooter would fix that by
    > >>> running it in XP mode. :-(
    > >>> --
    > >>> Crash
    > >> Wouldn't you get more or less the same effect as defragging by setting the
    > >> pagefile size to a minimum (16Mb with my laptop), rebooting, then setting
    > >> the pagefile to the size you want, and rebooting again? I assume that Win7
    > >> would have to create space on the disk for the new pagefile, and that space
    > >> would be a completely defragmented pagefile.

    > >
    > >
    > > Fragmentation of the page file is really a non-issue. Since access to
    > > the page file is random, it doesn't really matter at all if it's
    > > fragmented.
    > >

    > I am more interested in defragging the registry than the pagefile.



    Same thing. Access to the registry is also random.
     
  9. R. C. White

    R. C. White Flightless Bird

    Hi, Ken.

    I've noted that pagefile.sys is always dated today at the time that I turned
    on the computer this morning. My understanding is that a new page file is
    created each time the computer is restarted. It is started from scratch
    each time, and probably in a different location. So defragging would be of
    only transitory benefit anyhow, until the next restart.

    Is that correct?

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX
    rc@grandecom.net
    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2010 (15.3.2804.0607) in Win7 Ultimate x64)

    "Ken Blake" wrote in message
    news:v68a361abf7khp2sn9hu2jria4op99bns9@4ax.com...

    On Wed, 07 Jul 2010 19:29:17 -0400, "Dave \"Crash\" Dummy"
    <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote:

    > Ken Blake wrote:
    > > On Wed, 7 Jul 2010 21:11:15 +0100, "Jeff Layman"
    > > <jmlayman@invalid.invalid> wrote:
    > >
    > >> "Dave "Crash" Dummy" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    > >> news:SP3Zn.16292$dx7.6920@newsfe21.iad...
    > >>> Chuck wrote:
    > >>>> On 7/7/2010 12:35 PM, Dave "Crash" Dummy wrote:
    > >>>>> I am running 64 bit Windows 7 Ultimate, logged on with
    > >>>>> administrator privileges. When I try to run pagedfrg.exe as
    > >>>>> administrator, I get this error.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>> http://crash.thedatalist.com/temp/snapshot.htm
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>> I have tried "Troubleshoot compatibility" to no avail. I have the
    > >>>>> latest version of PageDefrag available on the Microsoft site,
    > >>>>> version
    > >>>>> 2.32.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>> I believe that your version runs on 32bit, not 64. At least that's
    > >>>> what the MS description indicates. I didn't see a version for 64bit.
    > >>> Bummer. I thought the compatibility troubleshooter would fix that by
    > >>> running it in XP mode. :-(
    > >>> --
    > >>> Crash
    > >> Wouldn't you get more or less the same effect as defragging by setting
    > >> the
    > >> pagefile size to a minimum (16Mb with my laptop), rebooting, then
    > >> setting
    > >> the pagefile to the size you want, and rebooting again? I assume that
    > >> Win7
    > >> would have to create space on the disk for the new pagefile, and that
    > >> space
    > >> would be a completely defragmented pagefile.

    > >
    > >
    > > Fragmentation of the page file is really a non-issue. Since access to
    > > the page file is random, it doesn't really matter at all if it's
    > > fragmented.
    > >

    > I am more interested in defragging the registry than the pagefile.



    Same thing. Access to the registry is also random.
     
  10. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Wed, 7 Jul 2010 21:14:10 -0500, "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net>
    wrote:

    > Hi, Ken.
    >
    > I've noted that pagefile.sys is always dated today at the time that I turned
    > on the computer this morning. My understanding is that a new page file is
    > created each time the computer is restarted. It is started from scratch
    > each time, and probably in a different location. So defragging would be of
    > only transitory benefit anyhow, until the next restart.
    >
    > Is that correct?



    It sounds right to me, RC, but I'm not completely sure.



    > "Ken Blake" wrote in message
    > news:v68a361abf7khp2sn9hu2jria4op99bns9@4ax.com...
    >
    > On Wed, 07 Jul 2010 19:29:17 -0400, "Dave \"Crash\" Dummy"
    > <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote:
    >
    > > Ken Blake wrote:
    > > > On Wed, 7 Jul 2010 21:11:15 +0100, "Jeff Layman"
    > > > <jmlayman@invalid.invalid> wrote:
    > > >
    > > >> "Dave "Crash" Dummy" <invalid@invalid.invalid> wrote in message
    > > >> news:SP3Zn.16292$dx7.6920@newsfe21.iad...
    > > >>> Chuck wrote:
    > > >>>> On 7/7/2010 12:35 PM, Dave "Crash" Dummy wrote:
    > > >>>>> I am running 64 bit Windows 7 Ultimate, logged on with
    > > >>>>> administrator privileges. When I try to run pagedfrg.exe as
    > > >>>>> administrator, I get this error.
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>>> http://crash.thedatalist.com/temp/snapshot.htm
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>>> I have tried "Troubleshoot compatibility" to no avail. I have the
    > > >>>>> latest version of PageDefrag available on the Microsoft site,
    > > >>>>> version
    > > >>>>> 2.32.
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>> I believe that your version runs on 32bit, not 64. At least that's
    > > >>>> what the MS description indicates. I didn't see a version for 64bit.
    > > >>> Bummer. I thought the compatibility troubleshooter would fix that by
    > > >>> running it in XP mode. :-(
    > > >>> --
    > > >>> Crash
    > > >> Wouldn't you get more or less the same effect as defragging by setting
    > > >> the
    > > >> pagefile size to a minimum (16Mb with my laptop), rebooting, then
    > > >> setting
    > > >> the pagefile to the size you want, and rebooting again? I assume that
    > > >> Win7
    > > >> would have to create space on the disk for the new pagefile, and that
    > > >> space
    > > >> would be a completely defragmented pagefile.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Fragmentation of the page file is really a non-issue. Since access to
    > > > the page file is random, it doesn't really matter at all if it's
    > > > fragmented.
    > > >

    > > I am more interested in defragging the registry than the pagefile.

    >
    >
    > Same thing. Access to the registry is also random.
     
  11. Jeff Layman

    Jeff Layman Flightless Bird

    "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
    news:tvKdnY-iJ5DrqajRnZ2dnUVZ_qmdnZ2d@posted.grandecom...
    > Hi, Ken.
    >
    > I've noted that pagefile.sys is always dated today at the time that I
    > turned on the computer this morning. My understanding is that a new page
    > file is created each time the computer is restarted. It is started from
    > scratch each time, and probably in a different location. So defragging
    > would be of only transitory benefit anyhow, until the next restart.
    >


    Is there a pagefile.sys on a hard disk (from a Windows OS) when you boot
    from a linux live CD and look at the C: drive? Or is it deleted when the
    computer is turned off?

    Is there a Windows utility which can be used to see exactly where any file
    resides on a HD (including pagefile.sys)? If so, it would be interesting to
    see where it is each time after a few reboots.

    --

    Jeff
     
  12. R. C. White

    R. C. White Flightless Bird

    Hi, Jeff.

    I've never used Linux, so I can't answer that part of your question.

    The pagefile.sys is not normally deleted when the computer is turned off.
    I've been dual-booting (multi-booting, usually) for a decade or more and I
    often see lingering pagefile.sys entries in the Boot volumes for Windows
    installations other than the one currently running. But, knowing that no
    two Windows installations can be using the page file at the same time, I've
    often set both Vista and Win7 (for example) to put their page file on Drive
    E: (for example). So when Vista is booted on Drive V:, it creates and uses
    E:/pagefile.sys; when Win7 is booted on Drive C:, it re-creates and uses
    E:/pagefile.sys. This conserves disk space - but since my last HDD addition
    (1 T8), I have more disk space than I need, so I don't bother with this
    currently. If I ever spot a pagefile.sys with a date other than today, or a
    time other than when I started the current session, then I know it is left
    over from some previous session and will never be used again, so I can
    safely delete it. If it ever is needed again, it will automatically be
    re-created.

    We can manage the size and location of pagefile.sys in each Windows
    installation by going to the end of a long click-path:
    Start | Control Panel | System | Advanced system settings | Advanced (You'll
    need to furnish Administrator credentials to get past here) | (Performance)
    Settings | Advanced | (Virtual memory) Change ... and Finally we see the
    Virtual Memory page. Whew!

    Here we can specify how much space Windows can use on each volume - or just
    choose System managed size, which is what I've almost always used in Vista
    and Win7.

    > Is there a Windows utility which can be used to see exactly where any file

    resides on a HD (including pagefile.sys)?

    Of course. Windows Explorer, after we've set Folder Options to show System
    Files. Both pagefile.sys and hiberfil.sys will be on the Boot volume, by
    default. We can change the location of pagefile.sys, as above, but unless
    we disable Hibernation, its file will always be on the Boot volume
    (normally, but not necessarily, Drive C:). And, if we disable Hibernation,
    we can delete the leftover hiberfil.sys file.

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX
    rc@grandecom.net
    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2010 (15.3.2804.0607) in Win7 Ultimate x64)


    "Jeff Layman" wrote in message news:i14fcb$49t$1@news.albasani.net...

    "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
    news:tvKdnY-iJ5DrqajRnZ2dnUVZ_qmdnZ2d@posted.grandecom...
    > Hi, Ken.
    >
    > I've noted that pagefile.sys is always dated today at the time that I
    > turned on the computer this morning. My understanding is that a new page
    > file is created each time the computer is restarted. It is started from
    > scratch each time, and probably in a different location. So defragging
    > would be of only transitory benefit anyhow, until the next restart.
    >


    Is there a pagefile.sys on a hard disk (from a Windows OS) when you boot
    from a linux live CD and look at the C: drive? Or is it deleted when the
    computer is turned off?

    Is there a Windows utility which can be used to see exactly where any file
    resides on a HD (including pagefile.sys)? If so, it would be interesting to
    see where it is each time after a few reboots.

    --

    Jeff
     
  13. Jeff Layman

    Jeff Layman Flightless Bird

    "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
    news:zpqdndzGUounSajRnZ2dnUVZ_hadnZ2d@posted.grandecom...
    >
    >> Is there a Windows utility which can be used to see exactly where any
    >> file

    > resides on a HD (including pagefile.sys)?
    >
    > Of course. Windows Explorer, after we've set Folder Options to show
    > System Files. Both pagefile.sys and hiberfil.sys will be on the Boot
    > volume, by default. We can change the location of pagefile.sys, as above,
    > but unless we disable Hibernation, its file will always be on the Boot
    > volume (normally, but not necessarily, Drive C:). And, if we disable
    > Hibernation, we can delete the leftover hiberfil.sys file.


    Sorry, wasn't clear in what I meant. What I was interested in was a utility
    which could tell you which sector(s) and track(s) a file occupied. I guess
    this means something which could interrogate the master file table data at
    any time, and show that information on the screen. I suppose that when a
    defragmentation program analyzes the disk, it is doing part of this by
    showing the defragmentation visually in a strip (or it did in XP - I'm not
    sure how much info the Win7 equivalent shows).

    --

    Jeff
     
  14. Bob I

    Bob I Flightless Bird

    On 7/7/2010 9:14 PM, R. C. White wrote:
    > Hi, Ken.
    >
    > I've noted that pagefile.sys is always dated today at the time that I
    > turned on the computer this morning. My understanding is that a new page
    > file is created each time the computer is restarted. It is started from
    > scratch each time, and probably in a different location. So defragging
    > would be of only transitory benefit anyhow, until the next restart.
    >
    > Is that correct?
    >
    > RC


    Nope, you're looking at the Date Modified, enable Date Created to see
    the correct info.
     
  15. R. C. White

    R. C. White Flightless Bird

    Hi, Bob.

    That's interesting! Could you explain what those dates mean? Does this
    change the practice I described? Does the page file move to a new location
    on each restart?

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX
    rc@grandecom.net
    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2010 (15.3.2804.0607) in Win7 Ultimate x64)


    "Bob I" wrote in message news:kOuZn.10968$Hw.6122@newsfe10.iad...

    On 7/7/2010 9:14 PM, R. C. White wrote:
    > Hi, Ken.
    >
    > I've noted that pagefile.sys is always dated today at the time that I
    > turned on the computer this morning. My understanding is that a new page
    > file is created each time the computer is restarted. It is started from
    > scratch each time, and probably in a different location. So defragging
    > would be of only transitory benefit anyhow, until the next restart.
    >
    > Is that correct?
    >
    > RC


    Nope, you're looking at the Date Modified, enable Date Created to see
    the correct info.
     
  16. Guest

    Guest Flightless Bird

    re-format your computer and install open source linux ubuntu, just fyi,
    thread closed!
     
  17. Char Jackson

    Char Jackson Flightless Bird

    On Thu, 8 Jul 2010 20:52:41 -0500, "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net>
    wrote:

    >Hi, Bob.
    >
    >That's interesting! Could you explain what those dates mean? Does this
    >change the practice I described? Does the page file move to a new location
    >on each restart?


    The pagefile is just a scratch pad, a dummy file that contains
    temporary data. The OS maintains pointers to that data, and those
    pointers are only valid for the duration of the current Windows
    session. During every system boot those pointers are cleared and the
    system starts fresh. At that moment, the pagefile still contains lots
    of data, (only the pointers were cleared), but it is data from a
    previous Windows session and is invalid in the current session and
    therefore is not used.**

    The pagefile never physically moves and doesn't routinely get deleted
    or recreated. It's created once, then it's reused over and over again.
    If you let Windows manage the size of the pagefile, it will
    dynamically grow (and theoretically shrink), as needed, and there lies
    the possible rub.

    When Windows needs to grow the pagefile, some number of days, weeks or
    months after Windows was installed, it may find that the contiguous
    disk blocks are already in use, so it will fragment the pagefile. It's
    this physical fragmentation of the pagefile that can slow down access
    to the contents of the pagefile.

    An obvious method of preventing pagefile fragmentation is to remove
    the pagefile (or temporarily move it to another drive or partition),
    defragment the partition where you want the pagefile to reside, then
    create a new pagefile, but this time manually set a minimum and
    maximum size rather than letting Windows manage the size. Since the
    pagefile will never shrink or grow, it cannot become fragmented.
    Windows will alert you if the pagefile is too small, so there's little
    or no danger from manually setting the size.

    **If you boot a live Linux OS on your Windows system you can examine
    the contents of the pagefile, looking for text strings and other
    goodies. It's somewhat surprising to see what's typically stored in
    there.
     
  18. J. D. Slocomb

    J. D. Slocomb Flightless Bird

    On Thu, 08 Jul 2010 20:19:09 -0500, Bob I <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >
    >
    >On 7/7/2010 9:14 PM, R. C. White wrote:
    >> Hi, Ken.
    >>
    >> I've noted that pagefile.sys is always dated today at the time that I
    >> turned on the computer this morning. My understanding is that a new page
    >> file is created each time the computer is restarted. It is started from
    >> scratch each time, and probably in a different location. So defragging
    >> would be of only transitory benefit anyhow, until the next restart.
    >>
    >> Is that correct?
    >>
    >> RC

    >
    >Nope, you're looking at the Date Modified, enable Date Created to see
    >the correct info.



    From a cursory search it seems that the "pagefile" is just a name used
    by MS for what other systems refer to as a "Swap File" - a place to
    swap out some memory resident instructions or data to allow another
    application to have more memory room. When the larger application is
    terminated, or the second program gains access's to the CPU the data
    is swapped back into memory.

    If this is correct then when the computer is shut down the pagefile
    data simply becomes redundant as the applications that used this data
    are stopped.

    In fact the system wilt run (usually) pretty well with no pagefile
    whatsoever.

    Cheers,

    John D. Slocomb
    (jdslocombatgmail)
     
  19. R. C. White

    R. C. White Flightless Bird

    Hi, Char.

    Thanks for the explanation. It mostly fits with what I already knew.

    Back in the day when 20 MB was a giant HDD and we were still using MS-DOS
    and FAT(12) and Peter Norton really wrote Norton Utilities, especially
    DiskEdit, I spent many tedious hours reading my disks, byte by byte. I was
    amazed at how much "erased" data was still there. Nowadays, I seldom look
    that closely at my disks, but I'm confident that many of my secrets that I
    "deleted" months or even years ago are still there and readable by anyone
    with the right tools (Yes, they are still available and some are built right
    into Win7, as I'm sure you know.) and just a small amount of skill. (Even
    before MS-DOS and hard drives, I did the same things on floppies with
    SuperZap and other utilities for my TRS-80s. Aah...memories! <g> )

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX
    rc@grandecom.net
    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2010 (15.3.2804.0607) in Win7 Ultimate x64)


    "Char Jackson" wrote in message
    news:ai4d36t0rnfvpr77o0h04iiim7lumad3jh@4ax.com...

    On Thu, 8 Jul 2010 20:52:41 -0500, "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net>
    wrote:

    >Hi, Bob.
    >
    >That's interesting! Could you explain what those dates mean? Does this
    >change the practice I described? Does the page file move to a new location
    >on each restart?


    The pagefile is just a scratch pad, a dummy file that contains
    temporary data. The OS maintains pointers to that data, and those
    pointers are only valid for the duration of the current Windows
    session. During every system boot those pointers are cleared and the
    system starts fresh. At that moment, the pagefile still contains lots
    of data, (only the pointers were cleared), but it is data from a
    previous Windows session and is invalid in the current session and
    therefore is not used.**

    The pagefile never physically moves and doesn't routinely get deleted
    or recreated. It's created once, then it's reused over and over again.
    If you let Windows manage the size of the pagefile, it will
    dynamically grow (and theoretically shrink), as needed, and there lies
    the possible rub.

    When Windows needs to grow the pagefile, some number of days, weeks or
    months after Windows was installed, it may find that the contiguous
    disk blocks are already in use, so it will fragment the pagefile. It's
    this physical fragmentation of the pagefile that can slow down access
    to the contents of the pagefile.

    An obvious method of preventing pagefile fragmentation is to remove
    the pagefile (or temporarily move it to another drive or partition),
    defragment the partition where you want the pagefile to reside, then
    create a new pagefile, but this time manually set a minimum and
    maximum size rather than letting Windows manage the size. Since the
    pagefile will never shrink or grow, it cannot become fragmented.
    Windows will alert you if the pagefile is too small, so there's little
    or no danger from manually setting the size.

    **If you boot a live Linux OS on your Windows system you can examine
    the contents of the pagefile, looking for text strings and other
    goodies. It's somewhat surprising to see what's typically stored in
    there.
     
  20. Dave \Crash\ Dummy

    Dave \Crash\ Dummy Flightless Bird

    R. C. White wrote:
    > Hi, Char.
    >
    > Thanks for the explanation. It mostly fits with what I already knew.
    >
    >
    >
    > Back in the day when 20 MB was a giant HDD and we were still using
    > MS-DOS and FAT(12) and Peter Norton really wrote Norton Utilities,
    > especially DiskEdit, I spent many tedious hours reading my disks,
    > byte by byte. I was amazed at how much "erased" data was still
    > there. Nowadays, I seldom look that closely at my disks, but I'm
    > confident that many of my secrets that I "deleted" months or even
    > years ago are still there and readable by anyone with the right tools
    > (Yes, they are still available and some are built right into Win7,
    > as I'm sure you know.) and just a small amount of skill. (Even
    > before MS-DOS and hard drives, I did the same things on floppies with
    > SuperZap and other utilities for my TRS-80s. Aah...memories! <g> )


    Data is never deleted. Sectors are just marked as available. If they are
    never used again, the data remains. So called disk cleaning software
    just overwrites the sectors numerous times to make the original data
    unreadable.

    Peter Norton selling out to Symantec was like having Santa Claus die. :-(
    --
    Crash

    "Facts are stubborn things, but statistics are more pliable."
    ~ Laurence J. Peter ~
     

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