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bootmanager in W7

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com, Feb 14, 2010.

  1. Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com

    Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com Flightless Bird

    I have a new laptop that came with pre-installed Windows 7 home premium
    64 bit. It had 2 partitions when it arrived:

    1) a large partition labeled "C: Local Disk"
    2) a small 200 mb partition labeled "D: System"

    Looking at the contents of D: I see it contains the following folders:
    a) recycle.bin
    b) Boot (which seems to contain language files)
    c) System Volume (which I cannot access)
    and a file "bootmgr"

    Questions:
    Why does this partition that contains the bootmgr and boot file have a
    drive letter? Should this _not_ have a drive letter to avoid accidental
    injury?

    If I remove its drive letter, will the laptop still boot correctly?

    Thanks.

    Jeff
     
  2. LouB

    LouB Flightless Bird

    Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com wrote:
    > I have a new laptop that came with pre-installed Windows 7 home premium
    > 64 bit. It had 2 partitions when it arrived:
    >
    > 1) a large partition labeled "C: Local Disk"
    > 2) a small 200 mb partition labeled "D: System"
    >
    > Looking at the contents of D: I see it contains the following folders:
    > a) recycle.bin
    > b) Boot (which seems to contain language files)
    > c) System Volume (which I cannot access)
    > and a file "bootmgr"
    >
    > Questions:
    > Why does this partition that contains the bootmgr and boot file have a
    > drive letter? Should this _not_ have a drive letter to avoid accidental
    > injury?
    >
    > If I remove its drive letter, will the laptop still boot correctly?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Jeff
    >

    It may well be a recovery partion in case the main C: drive gets blown
    away by malware or other problems.
    I believe most machines come this way nowdays. Leave it alone!
     
  3. Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com

    Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com Flightless Bird

    On 2/14/2010 12:54 PM, LouB wrote:
    > Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com wrote:
    >> I have a new laptop that came with pre-installed Windows 7 home
    >> premium 64 bit. It had 2 partitions when it arrived:
    >>
    >> 1) a large partition labeled "C: Local Disk"
    >> 2) a small 200 mb partition labeled "D: System"
    >>
    >> Looking at the contents of D: I see it contains the following folders:
    >> a) recycle.bin
    >> b) Boot (which seems to contain language files)
    >> c) System Volume (which I cannot access)
    >> and a file "bootmgr"
    >>
    >> Questions:
    >> Why does this partition that contains the bootmgr and boot file have a
    >> drive letter? Should this _not_ have a drive letter to avoid
    >> accidental injury?
    >>
    >> If I remove its drive letter, will the laptop still boot correctly?
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >> Jeff
    >>

    > It may well be a recovery partion in case the main C: drive gets blown
    > away by malware or other problems.
    > I believe most machines come this way nowdays. Leave it alone!


    Kind of small for a recovery partition. No? Only 32 MB of the 200 MBs
    are used.
     
  4. Jeff Layman

    Jeff Layman Flightless Bird

    <Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com> wrote in message
    news:SG_dn.49895$5n.17862@newsfe23.iad...
    > On 2/14/2010 12:54 PM, LouB wrote:
    >> Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com wrote:
    >>> I have a new laptop that came with pre-installed Windows 7 home
    >>> premium 64 bit. It had 2 partitions when it arrived:
    >>>
    >>> 1) a large partition labeled "C: Local Disk"
    >>> 2) a small 200 mb partition labeled "D: System"
    >>>
    >>> Looking at the contents of D: I see it contains the following folders:
    >>> a) recycle.bin
    >>> b) Boot (which seems to contain language files)
    >>> c) System Volume (which I cannot access)
    >>> and a file "bootmgr"
    >>>
    >>> Questions:
    >>> Why does this partition that contains the bootmgr and boot file have a
    >>> drive letter? Should this _not_ have a drive letter to avoid
    >>> accidental injury?
    >>>
    >>> If I remove its drive letter, will the laptop still boot correctly?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks.
    >>>
    >>> Jeff
    >>>

    >> It may well be a recovery partion in case the main C: drive gets blown
    >> away by malware or other problems.
    >> I believe most machines come this way nowdays. Leave it alone!

    >
    > Kind of small for a recovery partition. No? Only 32 MB of the 200 MBs are
    > used.


    Recovery partition D: on my HP laptop (same OS as yours) is around 10Gb.
    That includes quite a bit of HP crapware and a free Office 2007 trial, but I
    agree with you that 200Mb is far too small for a recovery partition. What do
    the vendors/manufacturers say that partition is for?


    --

    Jeff
     
  5. Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com

    Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com Flightless Bird

    On 2/14/2010 5:30 PM, Jeff Layman wrote:
    >
    > <Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com> wrote in message
    > news:SG_dn.49895$5n.17862@newsfe23.iad...
    >> On 2/14/2010 12:54 PM, LouB wrote:
    >>> Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com wrote:
    >>>> I have a new laptop that came with pre-installed Windows 7 home
    >>>> premium 64 bit. It had 2 partitions when it arrived:
    >>>>
    >>>> 1) a large partition labeled "C: Local Disk"
    >>>> 2) a small 200 mb partition labeled "D: System"
    >>>>
    >>>> Looking at the contents of D: I see it contains the following folders:
    >>>> a) recycle.bin
    >>>> b) Boot (which seems to contain language files)
    >>>> c) System Volume (which I cannot access)
    >>>> and a file "bootmgr"
    >>>>
    >>>> Questions:
    >>>> Why does this partition that contains the bootmgr and boot file have a
    >>>> drive letter? Should this _not_ have a drive letter to avoid
    >>>> accidental injury?
    >>>>
    >>>> If I remove its drive letter, will the laptop still boot correctly?
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks.
    >>>>
    >>>> Jeff
    >>>>
    >>> It may well be a recovery partion in case the main C: drive gets blown
    >>> away by malware or other problems.
    >>> I believe most machines come this way nowdays. Leave it alone!

    >>
    >> Kind of small for a recovery partition. No? Only 32 MB of the 200 MBs
    >> are used.

    >
    > Recovery partition D: on my HP laptop (same OS as yours) is around 10Gb.
    > That includes quite a bit of HP crapware and a free Office 2007 trial,
    > but I agree with you that 200Mb is far too small for a recovery
    > partition. What do the vendors/manufacturers say that partition is for?
    >
    >

    Thanks. That's why I think it is the old mbr partition and am wondering
    why it has a drive letter.

    This laptop is also a HP. Now that you mention it I do not see where
    they have the restore partition. Not a problem because I have multiple
    image backups and created the restore CDs. Just curious.
     
  6. Louis Rost

    Louis Rost Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 14 Feb 2010 17:20:31 -0500, "Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com"
    <Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com> wrote:

    >On 2/14/2010 12:54 PM, LouB wrote:
    >> Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com wrote:
    >>> I have a new laptop that came with pre-installed Windows 7 home
    >>> premium 64 bit. It had 2 partitions when it arrived:
    >>>
    >>> 1) a large partition labeled "C: Local Disk"
    >>> 2) a small 200 mb partition labeled "D: System"
    >>>
    >>> Looking at the contents of D: I see it contains the following folders:
    >>> a) recycle.bin
    >>> b) Boot (which seems to contain language files)
    >>> c) System Volume (which I cannot access)
    >>> and a file "bootmgr"
    >>>
    >>> Questions:
    >>> Why does this partition that contains the bootmgr and boot file have a
    >>> drive letter? Should this _not_ have a drive letter to avoid
    >>> accidental injury?
    >>>
    >>> If I remove its drive letter, will the laptop still boot correctly?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks.
    >>>
    >>> Jeff
    >>>

    >> It may well be a recovery partion in case the main C: drive gets blown
    >> away by malware or other problems.
    >> I believe most machines come this way nowdays. Leave it alone!

    >
    >Kind of small for a recovery partition. No? Only 32 MB of the 200 MBs
    >are used.


    Bootmgr and the content of Boot directory make up the boot loader in
    Vista and Windows 7. It replaces NTLDR and boot.ini found in XP
    systems.

    So, it appears your D: partition contains the boot loader. Diskmgmt
    will probably identify it as the active, system, boot partition.
    Without the D: drive your system cannot boot.
     
  7. Gene E. Bloch

    Gene E. Bloch Flightless Bird

    On 2/15/10, Louis Rost posted:
    > On Sun, 14 Feb 2010 17:20:31 -0500, "Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com"
    > <Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com> wrote:


    >> On 2/14/2010 12:54 PM, LouB wrote:
    >>> Jeff@couldbeinvalid.com wrote:
    >>>> I have a new laptop that came with pre-installed Windows 7 home
    >>>> premium 64 bit. It had 2 partitions when it arrived:
    >>>>
    >>>> 1) a large partition labeled "C: Local Disk"
    >>>> 2) a small 200 mb partition labeled "D: System"
    >>>>
    >>>> Looking at the contents of D: I see it contains the following folders:
    >>>> a) recycle.bin
    >>>> b) Boot (which seems to contain language files)
    >>>> c) System Volume (which I cannot access)
    >>>> and a file "bootmgr"
    >>>>
    >>>> Questions:
    >>>> Why does this partition that contains the bootmgr and boot file have a
    >>>> drive letter? Should this _not_ have a drive letter to avoid
    >>>> accidental injury?
    >>>>
    >>>> If I remove its drive letter, will the laptop still boot correctly?
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks.
    >>>>
    >>>> Jeff
    >>>>
    >>> It may well be a recovery partion in case the main C: drive gets blown
    >>> away by malware or other problems.
    >>> I believe most machines come this way nowdays. Leave it alone!

    >>
    >> Kind of small for a recovery partition. No? Only 32 MB of the 200 MBs
    >> are used.


    > Bootmgr and the content of Boot directory make up the boot loader in
    > Vista and Windows 7. It replaces NTLDR and boot.ini found in XP
    > systems.


    > So, it appears your D: partition contains the boot loader. Diskmgmt
    > will probably identify it as the active, system, boot partition.
    > Without the D: drive your system cannot boot.


    To add a bit: the recovery partition (and yes, it will be around 10G8)
    is probably not assigned a letter, so it can only be seen in the disk
    manager.

    Click on the start orb, start typing "Create and format hard disk
    partitions" (w/o quotes), and when it becomes visible above, select it.

    That application will show you any hidden partitions and tell you a bit
    about them.

    --
    Gene Bloch 650.366.4267 lettersatblochg.com
     

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