1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

boot up problem

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by smokey, Jan 7, 2010.

  1. smokey

    smokey Flightless Bird

    Using Windows XP Pro SP3 with MS Office
    When trying to start computer it goes to the screen to select safe mode;
    start from last working etc; or to start normally.
    Have tried all these and it still won't start properly. It gets the Windows
    page up as if loading and then drops out (no signal to monitor) and returns
    to this start screen again. When it does this there is a blue screen that is
    there for a very short time with writing. It is too fast to even get a
    chance to read it.
    I have a ASUS P4S800-MX motherboard.
    Is this a hardware problem. I have a video card and don't think this is a
    problem as I have removed it and connected to the motherboard and have the
    same problem as before.

    Any ideas?
    --
    smokey
     
  2. Jose

    Jose Flightless Bird

    On Jan 7, 11:26 pm, smokey <smo...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    > Using Windows XP Pro SP3 with MS Office
    > When trying to start computer it goes to the screen to select safe mode;
    > start from last working etc; or to start normally.
    > Have tried all these and it still won't start properly.  It gets the Windows
    > page up as if loading and then drops out (no signal to monitor) and returns
    > to this start screen again.  When it does this there is a blue screen that is
    > there for a very short time with writing.  It is too fast to even get a
    > chance to read it.
    > I have a ASUS P4S800-MX motherboard.  
    > Is this a hardware problem.  I have a video card and don't think this is a
    > problem as I have removed it and connected to the motherboard and have the
    > same problem as before.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    > --
    > smokey


    Sounds like you are seeing the Blue Screen of Death (BSOD).

    What do you think happened since the last time it booted? Power
    interruption, hardware change, software update, new software install,
    etc.

    Do you know your XP version and Service Pack and what is it?

    If you can only boot in some kind of Safe Mode, choose the option:

    Disable automatic restart on system failure so you can see the BSOD.

    Here are some BSOD blue screen of death examples showing information
    you need to provide:

    http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/images/Windows_XP_BSOD.png
    http://techrepublic.com.com/i/tr/downloads/images/bsod_a.jpg

    Send the information pointed to with the red arrows (3-4 lines
    total). Skip the boring text unless it looks important to you. We
    know what a BSOD looks like, we need to know the other information
    that is specific to your BSOD.

    In the meantime, you need to get booted on something.

    Either come up with a genuine bootable XP installation CD (not a
    system recovery CD that may have come with your system), or make
    yourself a bootable XP Recovery Console CD (no XP media required).

    If you don't have a genuine bootable XP installation CD, make a
    bootable Recovery Console CD using a working system:

    You can make a bootable Recovery Console CD by downloading an ISO file
    and burning it to a CD.

    The bootable ISO image file you need to download is called:

    xp_rec_con.iso

    Download the ISO file from here:

    http://www.mediafire.com/?ueyyzfymmig

    Use this free and easy program to create your bootable CD:

    http://www.imgburn.com/

    It would be a good idea to test your bootable CD on a computer that is
    working.

    You may need to adjust the computer BIOS settings to use the CD ROM
    drive as the first boot device instead of the hard disk. These
    adjustments are made before Windows tries to load. If you miss it,
    you will have to reboot the system again.

    When you boot on the CD, follow the prompts:

    Press any key to boot from CD...

    The Windows Setup... will proceed.

    Press 'R' to enter the Recovery Console.

    Select the installation you want to access (usually 1: C:/WINDOWS)

    You may be asked to enter the Administrator password (usually empty).

    You should be in the C:/WINDOWS folder. This is the same as the C:
    \WINDOWS folder you see in explorer.

    RC allows basic file commands - copy, rename, replace, delete, cd,
    chkdsk, fixboot, fixmbr, etc.

    Boot your system on the RC, then we will fix it.
     
  3. db

    db Flightless Bird

    it seems that if you cannot
    access any modes then your
    only option is

    to boot up with an xp cd and
    login to the recovery console.

    then at the system disk prompt
    you might try running the following
    commands:

    chkdsk /f
    fixboot

    then "exit" and reboot without
    cd.

    --
    db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>
    DatabaseBen, Retired Professional
    - Systems Analyst
    - Database Developer
    - Accountancy
    - Veteran of the Armed Forces
    - @Hotmail.com
    - nntp Postologist
    ~ "share the nirvana" - dbZen

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    >
    >


    "smokey" <smokey@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:0986C5B8-E1A7-4826-B900-3A431C8DC431@microsoft.com...
    > Using Windows XP Pro SP3 with MS Office
    > When trying to start computer it goes to the screen to select safe mode;
    > start from last working etc; or to start normally.
    > Have tried all these and it still won't start properly. It gets the
    > Windows
    > page up as if loading and then drops out (no signal to monitor) and
    > returns
    > to this start screen again. When it does this there is a blue screen that
    > is
    > there for a very short time with writing. It is too fast to even get a
    > chance to read it.
    > I have a ASUS P4S800-MX motherboard.
    > Is this a hardware problem. I have a video card and don't think this is a
    > problem as I have removed it and connected to the motherboard and have the
    > same problem as before.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    > --
    > smokey
     
  4. smokey

    smokey Flightless Bird

    Jose

    Running Win XP Pro Ver 2002, SP3

    Got the BCOD up & supply the following info:-
    PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA

    STOP: 0x00000050 (0xEC6B738D, 0x00000000, 0x866EC08C, 0x00000000)

    I have had problems with my CD/DVD drives not working, they won't read or
    burn. I have been using an external CD/DVD drive.

    I have not had any power problems. All I have was when I was using the
    computer, it rebooted and came up with the present problem. I found how to
    get the BCOD up and Googled 'PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA'. I removed the
    video card and connected the monitor to the motherboard. Did not fix the
    problem.

    I have two RAM cards,a 512 and 1 GB. Both have been in for about 18 months.
    I removed the 512 and the computer booted up OK. This was last Friday and I
    assumed the 512 was buggered. The computer has been working OK since then
    until I went to start it up this afternoon. It show the same errors.

    I have tried to swap around the RAM's, including an 256 card, still will not
    boot up.

    I am currently using a laptop which is using the same version of windows.
    Can I make a bootable Recovery Console CD from it?

    Any suggestions.
    --
    smokey


    "Jose" wrote:

    > On Jan 7, 11:26 pm, smokey <smo...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    > > Using Windows XP Pro SP3 with MS Office
    > > When trying to start computer it goes to the screen to select safe mode;
    > > start from last working etc; or to start normally.
    > > Have tried all these and it still won't start properly. It gets the Windows
    > > page up as if loading and then drops out (no signal to monitor) and returns
    > > to this start screen again. When it does this there is a blue screen that is
    > > there for a very short time with writing. It is too fast to even get a
    > > chance to read it.
    > > I have a ASUS P4S800-MX motherboard.
    > > Is this a hardware problem. I have a video card and don't think this is a
    > > problem as I have removed it and connected to the motherboard and have the
    > > same problem as before.
    > >
    > > Any ideas?
    > > --
    > > smokey

    >
    > Sounds like you are seeing the Blue Screen of Death (BSOD).
    >
    > What do you think happened since the last time it booted? Power
    > interruption, hardware change, software update, new software install,
    > etc.
    >
    > Do you know your XP version and Service Pack and what is it?
    >
    > If you can only boot in some kind of Safe Mode, choose the option:
    >
    > Disable automatic restart on system failure so you can see the BSOD.
    >
    > Here are some BSOD blue screen of death examples showing information
    > you need to provide:
    >
    > http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/images/Windows_XP_BSOD.png
    > http://techrepublic.com.com/i/tr/downloads/images/bsod_a.jpg
    >
    > Send the information pointed to with the red arrows (3-4 lines
    > total). Skip the boring text unless it looks important to you. We
    > know what a BSOD looks like, we need to know the other information
    > that is specific to your BSOD.
    >
    > In the meantime, you need to get booted on something.
    >
    > Either come up with a genuine bootable XP installation CD (not a
    > system recovery CD that may have come with your system), or make
    > yourself a bootable XP Recovery Console CD (no XP media required).
    >
    > If you don't have a genuine bootable XP installation CD, make a
    > bootable Recovery Console CD using a working system:
    >
    > You can make a bootable Recovery Console CD by downloading an ISO file
    > and burning it to a CD.
    >
    > The bootable ISO image file you need to download is called:
    >
    > xp_rec_con.iso
    >
    > Download the ISO file from here:
    >
    > http://www.mediafire.com/?ueyyzfymmig
    >
    > Use this free and easy program to create your bootable CD:
    >
    > http://www.imgburn.com/
    >
    > It would be a good idea to test your bootable CD on a computer that is
    > working.
    >
    > You may need to adjust the computer BIOS settings to use the CD ROM
    > drive as the first boot device instead of the hard disk. These
    > adjustments are made before Windows tries to load. If you miss it,
    > you will have to reboot the system again.
    >
    > When you boot on the CD, follow the prompts:
    >
    > Press any key to boot from CD...
    >
    > The Windows Setup... will proceed.
    >
    > Press 'R' to enter the Recovery Console.
    >
    > Select the installation you want to access (usually 1: C:/WINDOWS)
    >
    > You may be asked to enter the Administrator password (usually empty).
    >
    > You should be in the C:/WINDOWS folder. This is the same as the C:
    > \WINDOWS folder you see in explorer.
    >
    > RC allows basic file commands - copy, rename, replace, delete, cd,
    > chkdsk, fixboot, fixmbr, etc.
    >
    > Boot your system on the RC, then we will fix it.
    >
    > .
    >
     
  5. Jose

    Jose Flightless Bird

    On Jan 14, 6:06 am, smokey <smo...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    > Jose
    >
    > Running Win XP Pro Ver 2002, SP3
    >
    > Got the BCOD up & supply the following info:-
    > PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA
    >
    > STOP: 0x00000050 (0xEC6B738D, 0x00000000, 0x866EC08C, 0x00000000)
    >
    > I have had problems with my CD/DVD drives not working, they won't read or
    > burn.  I have been using an external CD/DVD drive.
    >
    > I have not had any power problems.  All I have was when I was using the
    > computer, it rebooted and came up with the present problem.  I found how to
    > get the BCOD up and Googled 'PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA'.  I removed the
    > video card and connected the monitor to the motherboard.  Did not fix the
    > problem.
    >
    > I have two RAM cards,a 512 and 1 GB.  Both have been in for about 18 months.
    >  I removed the 512 and the computer booted up OK.  This was last Friday and I
    > assumed the 512 was buggered.  The computer has been working OK since then
    > until I went to start it up this afternoon.  It show the same errors.
    >
    > I have tried to swap around the RAM's, including an 256 card, still will not
    > boot up.
    >
    > I am currently using a laptop which is using the same version of windows. 
    > Can I make a bootable Recovery Console CD from it?
    >
    > Any suggestions.
    > --
    > smokey
    >
    >
    >
    > "Jose" wrote:
    > > On Jan 7, 11:26 pm, smokey <smo...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    > > > Using Windows XP Pro SP3 with MS Office
    > > > When trying to start computer it goes to the screen to select safe mode;
    > > > start from last working etc; or to start normally.
    > > > Have tried all these and it still won't start properly.  It gets the Windows
    > > > page up as if loading and then drops out (no signal to monitor) and returns
    > > > to this start screen again.  When it does this there is a blue screen that is
    > > > there for a very short time with writing.  It is too fast to even get a
    > > > chance to read it.
    > > > I have a ASUS P4S800-MX motherboard.  
    > > > Is this a hardware problem.  I have a video card and don't think this is a
    > > > problem as I have removed it and connected to the motherboard and have the
    > > > same problem as before.

    >
    > > > Any ideas?
    > > > --
    > > > smokey

    >
    > > Sounds like you are seeing the Blue Screen of Death (BSOD).

    >
    > > What do you think happened since the last time it booted?  Power
    > > interruption, hardware change, software update, new software install,
    > > etc.

    >
    > > Do you know your XP version and Service Pack and what is it?

    >
    > > If you can only boot in some kind of Safe Mode, choose the option:

    >
    > > Disable automatic restart on system failure so you can see the BSOD.

    >
    > > Here are some BSOD blue screen of death examples showing information
    > > you need to provide:

    >
    > >http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/images/Windows_XP_BSOD.png
    > >http://techrepublic.com.com/i/tr/downloads/images/bsod_a.jpg

    >
    > > Send the information pointed to with the red arrows (3-4 lines
    > > total).  Skip the boring text unless it looks important to you.  We
    > > know what a BSOD looks like, we need to know the other information
    > > that is specific to your BSOD.

    >
    > > In the meantime, you need to get booted on something.

    >
    > > Either come up with a genuine bootable XP installation CD (not a
    > > system recovery CD that may have come with your system), or make
    > > yourself a bootable XP Recovery Console CD (no XP media required).

    >
    > > If you don't have a genuine bootable XP installation CD, make a
    > > bootable Recovery Console CD using a working system:

    >
    > > You can make a bootable Recovery Console CD by downloading an ISO file
    > > and burning it to a CD.

    >
    > > The bootable ISO image file you need to download is called:

    >
    > > xp_rec_con.iso

    >
    > > Download the ISO file from here:

    >
    > >http://www.mediafire.com/?ueyyzfymmig

    >
    > > Use this free and easy program to create your bootable CD:

    >
    > >http://www.imgburn.com/

    >
    > > It would be a good idea to test your bootable CD on a computer that is
    > > working.

    >
    > > You may need to adjust the computer BIOS settings to use the CD ROM
    > > drive as the first boot device instead of the hard disk.  These
    > > adjustments are made before Windows tries to load.  If you miss it,
    > > you will have to reboot the system again.

    >
    > > When you boot on the CD, follow the prompts:

    >
    > > Press any key to boot from CD...

    >
    > > The Windows Setup... will proceed.

    >
    > > Press 'R' to enter the Recovery Console.

    >
    > > Select the installation you want to access (usually  1: C:/WINDOWS)

    >
    > > You may be asked to enter the Administrator password (usually empty).

    >
    > > You should be in the C:/WINDOWS folder.  This is the same as the C:
    > > \WINDOWS folder you see in explorer.

    >
    > > RC allows basic file commands - copy, rename, replace, delete, cd,
    > > chkdsk, fixboot, fixmbr, etc.

    >
    > > Boot your system on the RC, then we will fix it.

    >
    > > .


    If you can download and can burn a CD, most certainly. It is very
    general purpose and not machine specific.

    Read above for instructions on how to make your own bootable Recovery
    Console CD and you can create and test it in a working computer. If
    you don't understand my copy/paste directions, let me know.

    For suspicious RAM, you can create another bootable CD with memtest86+
    on it and test on the afflicted machine - all the RAM, one stick at a
    time, etc. To me, even one memtest86+ error qualifies as a failure
    and means replace the RAM.

    Run the memtest86+ on the afflicted system while you are creating the
    RC disc on your good system (multi task).

    Both of these CDs are good things to have anyway in your computer CD
    collection.

    Run a test of your RAM with memtest86+ (I know it is boring and will
    cost you a CD).

    The memtest will not run under Windows, so you will need to download
    the ISO file and create a bootable CD, boot on that and then run the
    memtest program.

    The file and instructions are here:

    http://www.memtest.org/

    If someone suggests that you run memtest86, you can say that you know
    memtest86+ supercedes memtest86 and here's why:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memtest86
     
  6. smokey

    smokey Flightless Bird

    Jose

    Thanks for your assistance - it is appreciated.

    I burnt a Recovery Console CD as you suggented and tried to run it. I went
    ito the BIOS and noticed the primary CD/DVD drive was enabled and the hard
    drive was also enabled. I booted the system with the disc in but nothing
    changed - it wnet to the normal screen about booting from Safe Mode, normally
    etc. I went ito the BIOS again and changed the CD/DVD drive to the secondary
    one and re-booted. Well it went to the normal first screen listing the hard
    drive and CD/DVD drives and then it went to the other screen listing memory
    IDE drives etc and I thought 'this is it' and waited for it to then print
    across the screen about pressing any key to boot from the CD, but alas it
    went to the screen about loading from Safe Mode etc.

    As I have mentioned I have been having problems with the two CD/DVD drives
    not working properly. Would this be the problem - should I purchase a new
    one and replace it in stead of these two drives. I have an external CD/DVD
    drive I have been using. Can I disable the CD/DVD drive in the BIOS and use
    the external CD/DVD drive. If so, how do you do that as it is connected thru
    the USB connection. I noticed in the BIOS about the USB the is a number of
    option, but unsure which one I would use.

    Smokey
    --
    smokey


    "Jose" wrote:

    > On Jan 14, 6:06 am, smokey <smo...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    > > Jose
    > >
    > > Running Win XP Pro Ver 2002, SP3
    > >
    > > Got the BCOD up & supply the following info:-
    > > PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA
    > >
    > > STOP: 0x00000050 (0xEC6B738D, 0x00000000, 0x866EC08C, 0x00000000)
    > >
    > > I have had problems with my CD/DVD drives not working, they won't read or
    > > burn. I have been using an external CD/DVD drive.
    > >
    > > I have not had any power problems. All I have was when I was using the
    > > computer, it rebooted and came up with the present problem. I found how to
    > > get the BCOD up and Googled 'PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA'. I removed the
    > > video card and connected the monitor to the motherboard. Did not fix the
    > > problem.
    > >
    > > I have two RAM cards,a 512 and 1 GB. Both have been in for about 18 months.
    > > I removed the 512 and the computer booted up OK. This was last Friday and I
    > > assumed the 512 was buggered. The computer has been working OK since then
    > > until I went to start it up this afternoon. It show the same errors.
    > >
    > > I have tried to swap around the RAM's, including an 256 card, still will not
    > > boot up.
    > >
    > > I am currently using a laptop which is using the same version of windows.
    > > Can I make a bootable Recovery Console CD from it?
    > >
    > > Any suggestions.
    > > --
    > > smokey
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Jose" wrote:
    > > > On Jan 7, 11:26 pm, smokey <smo...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    > > > > Using Windows XP Pro SP3 with MS Office
    > > > > When trying to start computer it goes to the screen to select safe mode;
    > > > > start from last working etc; or to start normally.
    > > > > Have tried all these and it still won't start properly. It gets the Windows
    > > > > page up as if loading and then drops out (no signal to monitor) and returns
    > > > > to this start screen again. When it does this there is a blue screen that is
    > > > > there for a very short time with writing. It is too fast to even get a
    > > > > chance to read it.
    > > > > I have a ASUS P4S800-MX motherboard.
    > > > > Is this a hardware problem. I have a video card and don't think this is a
    > > > > problem as I have removed it and connected to the motherboard and have the
    > > > > same problem as before.

    > >
    > > > > Any ideas?
    > > > > --
    > > > > smokey

    > >
    > > > Sounds like you are seeing the Blue Screen of Death (BSOD).

    > >
    > > > What do you think happened since the last time it booted? Power
    > > > interruption, hardware change, software update, new software install,
    > > > etc.

    > >
    > > > Do you know your XP version and Service Pack and what is it?

    > >
    > > > If you can only boot in some kind of Safe Mode, choose the option:

    > >
    > > > Disable automatic restart on system failure so you can see the BSOD.

    > >
    > > > Here are some BSOD blue screen of death examples showing information
    > > > you need to provide:

    > >
    > > >http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/images/Windows_XP_BSOD.png
    > > >http://techrepublic.com.com/i/tr/downloads/images/bsod_a.jpg

    > >
    > > > Send the information pointed to with the red arrows (3-4 lines
    > > > total). Skip the boring text unless it looks important to you. We
    > > > know what a BSOD looks like, we need to know the other information
    > > > that is specific to your BSOD.

    > >
    > > > In the meantime, you need to get booted on something.

    > >
    > > > Either come up with a genuine bootable XP installation CD (not a
    > > > system recovery CD that may have come with your system), or make
    > > > yourself a bootable XP Recovery Console CD (no XP media required).

    > >
    > > > If you don't have a genuine bootable XP installation CD, make a
    > > > bootable Recovery Console CD using a working system:

    > >
    > > > You can make a bootable Recovery Console CD by downloading an ISO file
    > > > and burning it to a CD.

    > >
    > > > The bootable ISO image file you need to download is called:

    > >
    > > > xp_rec_con.iso

    > >
    > > > Download the ISO file from here:

    > >
    > > >http://www.mediafire.com/?ueyyzfymmig

    > >
    > > > Use this free and easy program to create your bootable CD:

    > >
    > > >http://www.imgburn.com/

    > >
    > > > It would be a good idea to test your bootable CD on a computer that is
    > > > working.

    > >
    > > > You may need to adjust the computer BIOS settings to use the CD ROM
    > > > drive as the first boot device instead of the hard disk. These
    > > > adjustments are made before Windows tries to load. If you miss it,
    > > > you will have to reboot the system again.

    > >
    > > > When you boot on the CD, follow the prompts:

    > >
    > > > Press any key to boot from CD...

    > >
    > > > The Windows Setup... will proceed.

    > >
    > > > Press 'R' to enter the Recovery Console.

    > >
    > > > Select the installation you want to access (usually 1: C:/WINDOWS)

    > >
    > > > You may be asked to enter the Administrator password (usually empty).

    > >
    > > > You should be in the C:/WINDOWS folder. This is the same as the C:
    > > > \WINDOWS folder you see in explorer.

    > >
    > > > RC allows basic file commands - copy, rename, replace, delete, cd,
    > > > chkdsk, fixboot, fixmbr, etc.

    > >
    > > > Boot your system on the RC, then we will fix it.

    > >
    > > > .

    >
    > If you can download and can burn a CD, most certainly. It is very
    > general purpose and not machine specific.
    >
    > Read above for instructions on how to make your own bootable Recovery
    > Console CD and you can create and test it in a working computer. If
    > you don't understand my copy/paste directions, let me know.
    >
    > For suspicious RAM, you can create another bootable CD with memtest86+
    > on it and test on the afflicted machine - all the RAM, one stick at a
    > time, etc. To me, even one memtest86+ error qualifies as a failure
    > and means replace the RAM.
    >
    > Run the memtest86+ on the afflicted system while you are creating the
    > RC disc on your good system (multi task).
    >
    > Both of these CDs are good things to have anyway in your computer CD
    > collection.
    >
    > Run a test of your RAM with memtest86+ (I know it is boring and will
    > cost you a CD).
    >
    > The memtest will not run under Windows, so you will need to download
    > the ISO file and create a bootable CD, boot on that and then run the
    > memtest program.
    >
    > The file and instructions are here:
    >
    > http://www.memtest.org/
    >
    > If someone suggests that you run memtest86, you can say that you know
    > memtest86+ supercedes memtest86 and here's why:
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memtest86
    > .
    >
     
  7. smokey

    smokey Flightless Bird

    I have had problems with my CD/DVD drives not working, they won't read or
    burn. I have been using an external CD/DVD drive.

    I burnt a Recovery Console CD as suggented and tried to run it. I went
    ito the BIOS and noticed the primary CD/DVD drive was enabled and the hard
    drive was also enabled. I booted the system with the disc in but nothing
    changed - it wnet to the normal screen about booting from Safe Mode, normally
    etc. I went ito the BIOS again and changed the CD/DVD drive to the secondary
    one and re-booted. Well it went to the normal first screen listing the hard
    drive and CD/DVD drives and then it went to the other screen listing memory
    IDE drives etc and I thought 'this is it' and waited for it to then print
    across the screen about pressing any key to boot from the CD, but alas it
    went to the screen about loading from Safe Mode etc.

    As I have mentioned I have been having problems with the two CD/DVD drives
    not working properly. Would this be the problem - should I purchase a new
    one and replace it in stead of these two drives. I have an external CD/DVD
    drive I have been using. Can I disable the CD/DVD drive in the BIOS and use
    the external CD/DVD drive. If so, how do you do that as it is connected thru
    the USB connection. I noticed in the BIOS about the USB the is a number of
    option, but unsure which one I would use.

    Any suggestions????


    --
    smokey


    "db" wrote:

    > it seems that if you cannot
    > access any modes then your
    > only option is
    >
    > to boot up with an xp cd and
    > login to the recovery console.
    >
    > then at the system disk prompt
    > you might try running the following
    > commands:
    >
    > chkdsk /f
    > fixboot
    >
    > then "exit" and reboot without
    > cd.
    >
    > --
    > db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>
    > DatabaseBen, Retired Professional
    > - Systems Analyst
    > - Database Developer
    > - Accountancy
    > - Veteran of the Armed Forces
    > - @Hotmail.com
    > - nntp Postologist
    > ~ "share the nirvana" - dbZen
    >
    > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    > >
    > >

    >
    > "smokey" <smokey@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:0986C5B8-E1A7-4826-B900-3A431C8DC431@microsoft.com...
    > > Using Windows XP Pro SP3 with MS Office
    > > When trying to start computer it goes to the screen to select safe mode;
    > > start from last working etc; or to start normally.
    > > Have tried all these and it still won't start properly. It gets the
    > > Windows
    > > page up as if loading and then drops out (no signal to monitor) and
    > > returns
    > > to this start screen again. When it does this there is a blue screen that
    > > is
    > > there for a very short time with writing. It is too fast to even get a
    > > chance to read it.
    > > I have a ASUS P4S800-MX motherboard.
    > > Is this a hardware problem. I have a video card and don't think this is a
    > > problem as I have removed it and connected to the motherboard and have the
    > > same problem as before.
    > >
    > > Any ideas?
    > > --
    > > smokey

    >
    > .
    >
     
  8. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    smokey wrote:
    > I have had problems with my CD/DVD drives not working, they won't read or
    > burn. I have been using an external CD/DVD drive.
    >
    > I burnt a Recovery Console CD as suggented and tried to run it. I went
    > ito the BIOS and noticed the primary CD/DVD drive was enabled and the hard
    > drive was also enabled. I booted the system with the disc in but nothing
    > changed - it wnet to the normal screen about booting from Safe Mode, normally
    > etc. I went ito the BIOS again and changed the CD/DVD drive to the secondary
    > one and re-booted. Well it went to the normal first screen listing the hard
    > drive and CD/DVD drives and then it went to the other screen listing memory
    > IDE drives etc and I thought 'this is it' and waited for it to then print
    > across the screen about pressing any key to boot from the CD, but alas it
    > went to the screen about loading from Safe Mode etc.
    >
    > As I have mentioned I have been having problems with the two CD/DVD drives
    > not working properly. Would this be the problem - should I purchase a new
    > one and replace it in stead of these two drives. I have an external CD/DVD
    > drive I have been using. Can I disable the CD/DVD drive in the BIOS and use
    > the external CD/DVD drive. If so, how do you do that as it is connected thru
    > the USB connection. I noticed in the BIOS about the USB the is a number of
    > option, but unsure which one I would use.
    >
    > Any suggestions???
    >


    If Windows is running on some PC, and you insert that newly burned disc,
    do you see this as the only file listed ?

    xp_rec_con.iso

    Or do you see the following folder, which happens to be full of files ?

    i386

    The difference between those two, is how you chose to burn xp_rec_con.iso.
    You need a program which parses an ISO9660 file and burns a bootable CD
    from it. I use Nero for that purpose, as Windows doesn't have a built-in
    capability. But there are other, freeware programs that can do it if
    necessary. When I buy an optical burner, I try to buy one with Nero
    bundled with the drive, as then I'm instantly ready.

    If you're on a budget, see the Freeware section here.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_optical_disc_authoring_software

    When the disc is burned properly, check and see if the "i386" folder
    is visible when the CD is listed on another Windows machine.

    (When you download an ISO9660 file, you can examine the inside of it with
    the 7ZIP program. That is how I know there is an i386 folder stored inside
    the ISO9660.)

    Paul
     
  9. smokey

    smokey Flightless Bird

    Paul

    I have hace a look at the burnt recovery dics and it has the i386 folder
    which is full of file, plus two other files WIN51 and WIN511C. As I have
    said it will not boot from the two internal drives. How do I hake it boot
    from an external drive that I have?
    --
    smokey


    "Paul" wrote:

    > smokey wrote:
    > > I have had problems with my CD/DVD drives not working, they won't read or
    > > burn. I have been using an external CD/DVD drive.
    > >
    > > I burnt a Recovery Console CD as suggented and tried to run it. I went
    > > ito the BIOS and noticed the primary CD/DVD drive was enabled and the hard
    > > drive was also enabled. I booted the system with the disc in but nothing
    > > changed - it wnet to the normal screen about booting from Safe Mode, normally
    > > etc. I went ito the BIOS again and changed the CD/DVD drive to the secondary
    > > one and re-booted. Well it went to the normal first screen listing the hard
    > > drive and CD/DVD drives and then it went to the other screen listing memory
    > > IDE drives etc and I thought 'this is it' and waited for it to then print
    > > across the screen about pressing any key to boot from the CD, but alas it
    > > went to the screen about loading from Safe Mode etc.
    > >
    > > As I have mentioned I have been having problems with the two CD/DVD drives
    > > not working properly. Would this be the problem - should I purchase a new
    > > one and replace it in stead of these two drives. I have an external CD/DVD
    > > drive I have been using. Can I disable the CD/DVD drive in the BIOS and use
    > > the external CD/DVD drive. If so, how do you do that as it is connected thru
    > > the USB connection. I noticed in the BIOS about the USB the is a number of
    > > option, but unsure which one I would use.
    > >
    > > Any suggestions???
    > >

    >
    > If Windows is running on some PC, and you insert that newly burned disc,
    > do you see this as the only file listed ?
    >
    > xp_rec_con.iso
    >
    > Or do you see the following folder, which happens to be full of files ?
    >
    > i386
    >
    > The difference between those two, is how you chose to burn xp_rec_con.iso.
    > You need a program which parses an ISO9660 file and burns a bootable CD
    > from it. I use Nero for that purpose, as Windows doesn't have a built-in
    > capability. But there are other, freeware programs that can do it if
    > necessary. When I buy an optical burner, I try to buy one with Nero
    > bundled with the drive, as then I'm instantly ready.
    >
    > If you're on a budget, see the Freeware section here.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_optical_disc_authoring_software
    >
    > When the disc is burned properly, check and see if the "i386" folder
    > is visible when the CD is listed on another Windows machine.
    >
    > (When you download an ISO9660 file, you can examine the inside of it with
    > the 7ZIP program. That is how I know there is an i386 folder stored inside
    > the ISO9660.)
    >
    > Paul
    >
    >
    > .
    >
     
  10. smokey

    smokey Flightless Bird

    I have gone into the BIOS and the startup is follows:-
    1 ATAPI CD-ROM [the primary CD/DVD Drive]
    2 Remonavle /Drive [Disabled]
    3 IDE Hard Drive [the hard drive]
    4 Other Boot Device [INTI8 Device (Network)]

    Is this the right order???
    In relation to 4, I disabled this, but it still did not work. I have also
    changed the primary CD/DVD drive to the secondary CD/DVD drive and rebooted
    and this is where it went to the second screen listing everything including
    IDE devices and then rebooted. It appears that the CD/DVD drives are not
    working.

    Any advice?
    --
    smokey


    "Jose" wrote:

    > On Jan 14, 6:06 am, smokey <smo...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    > > Jose
    > >
    > > Running Win XP Pro Ver 2002, SP3
    > >
    > > Got the BCOD up & supply the following info:-
    > > PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA
    > >
    > > STOP: 0x00000050 (0xEC6B738D, 0x00000000, 0x866EC08C, 0x00000000)
    > >
    > > I have had problems with my CD/DVD drives not working, they won't read or
    > > burn. I have been using an external CD/DVD drive.
    > >
    > > I have not had any power problems. All I have was when I was using the
    > > computer, it rebooted and came up with the present problem. I found how to
    > > get the BCOD up and Googled 'PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA'. I removed the
    > > video card and connected the monitor to the motherboard. Did not fix the
    > > problem.
    > >
    > > I have two RAM cards,a 512 and 1 GB. Both have been in for about 18 months.
    > > I removed the 512 and the computer booted up OK. This was last Friday and I
    > > assumed the 512 was buggered. The computer has been working OK since then
    > > until I went to start it up this afternoon. It show the same errors.
    > >
    > > I have tried to swap around the RAM's, including an 256 card, still will not
    > > boot up.
    > >
    > > I am currently using a laptop which is using the same version of windows.
    > > Can I make a bootable Recovery Console CD from it?
    > >
    > > Any suggestions.
    > > --
    > > smokey
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Jose" wrote:
    > > > On Jan 7, 11:26 pm, smokey <smo...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    > > > > Using Windows XP Pro SP3 with MS Office
    > > > > When trying to start computer it goes to the screen to select safe mode;
    > > > > start from last working etc; or to start normally.
    > > > > Have tried all these and it still won't start properly. It gets the Windows
    > > > > page up as if loading and then drops out (no signal to monitor) and returns
    > > > > to this start screen again. When it does this there is a blue screen that is
    > > > > there for a very short time with writing. It is too fast to even get a
    > > > > chance to read it.
    > > > > I have a ASUS P4S800-MX motherboard.
    > > > > Is this a hardware problem. I have a video card and don't think this is a
    > > > > problem as I have removed it and connected to the motherboard and have the
    > > > > same problem as before.

    > >
    > > > > Any ideas?
    > > > > --
    > > > > smokey

    > >
    > > > Sounds like you are seeing the Blue Screen of Death (BSOD).

    > >
    > > > What do you think happened since the last time it booted? Power
    > > > interruption, hardware change, software update, new software install,
    > > > etc.

    > >
    > > > Do you know your XP version and Service Pack and what is it?

    > >
    > > > If you can only boot in some kind of Safe Mode, choose the option:

    > >
    > > > Disable automatic restart on system failure so you can see the BSOD.

    > >
    > > > Here are some BSOD blue screen of death examples showing information
    > > > you need to provide:

    > >
    > > >http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/images/Windows_XP_BSOD.png
    > > >http://techrepublic.com.com/i/tr/downloads/images/bsod_a.jpg

    > >
    > > > Send the information pointed to with the red arrows (3-4 lines
    > > > total). Skip the boring text unless it looks important to you. We
    > > > know what a BSOD looks like, we need to know the other information
    > > > that is specific to your BSOD.

    > >
    > > > In the meantime, you need to get booted on something.

    > >
    > > > Either come up with a genuine bootable XP installation CD (not a
    > > > system recovery CD that may have come with your system), or make
    > > > yourself a bootable XP Recovery Console CD (no XP media required).

    > >
    > > > If you don't have a genuine bootable XP installation CD, make a
    > > > bootable Recovery Console CD using a working system:

    > >
    > > > You can make a bootable Recovery Console CD by downloading an ISO file
    > > > and burning it to a CD.

    > >
    > > > The bootable ISO image file you need to download is called:

    > >
    > > > xp_rec_con.iso

    > >
    > > > Download the ISO file from here:

    > >
    > > >http://www.mediafire.com/?ueyyzfymmig

    > >
    > > > Use this free and easy program to create your bootable CD:

    > >
    > > >http://www.imgburn.com/

    > >
    > > > It would be a good idea to test your bootable CD on a computer that is
    > > > working.

    > >
    > > > You may need to adjust the computer BIOS settings to use the CD ROM
    > > > drive as the first boot device instead of the hard disk. These
    > > > adjustments are made before Windows tries to load. If you miss it,
    > > > you will have to reboot the system again.

    > >
    > > > When you boot on the CD, follow the prompts:

    > >
    > > > Press any key to boot from CD...

    > >
    > > > The Windows Setup... will proceed.

    > >
    > > > Press 'R' to enter the Recovery Console.

    > >
    > > > Select the installation you want to access (usually 1: C:/WINDOWS)

    > >
    > > > You may be asked to enter the Administrator password (usually empty).

    > >
    > > > You should be in the C:/WINDOWS folder. This is the same as the C:
    > > > \WINDOWS folder you see in explorer.

    > >
    > > > RC allows basic file commands - copy, rename, replace, delete, cd,
    > > > chkdsk, fixboot, fixmbr, etc.

    > >
    > > > Boot your system on the RC, then we will fix it.

    > >
    > > > .

    >
    > If you can download and can burn a CD, most certainly. It is very
    > general purpose and not machine specific.
    >
    > Read above for instructions on how to make your own bootable Recovery
    > Console CD and you can create and test it in a working computer. If
    > you don't understand my copy/paste directions, let me know.
    >
    > For suspicious RAM, you can create another bootable CD with memtest86+
    > on it and test on the afflicted machine - all the RAM, one stick at a
    > time, etc. To me, even one memtest86+ error qualifies as a failure
    > and means replace the RAM.
    >
    > Run the memtest86+ on the afflicted system while you are creating the
    > RC disc on your good system (multi task).
    >
    > Both of these CDs are good things to have anyway in your computer CD
    > collection.
    >
    > Run a test of your RAM with memtest86+ (I know it is boring and will
    > cost you a CD).
    >
    > The memtest will not run under Windows, so you will need to download
    > the ISO file and create a bootable CD, boot on that and then run the
    > memtest program.
    >
    > The file and instructions are here:
    >
    > http://www.memtest.org/
    >
    > If someone suggests that you run memtest86, you can say that you know
    > memtest86+ supercedes memtest86 and here's why:
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memtest86
    > .
    >
     

Share This Page