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battery on the motherboard

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Jack B, Apr 2, 2010.

  1. Jack B

    Jack B Flightless Bird

    When does the little battery on the motherboard need to be replaced?

    Jack
     
  2. PA Bear [MS MVP]

    PA Bear [MS MVP] Flightless Bird

    Before it craps out.

    Jack B wrote:
    > When does the little battery on the motherboard need to be replaced?
    >
    > Jack
     
  3. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    When the clock is wrong after booting up from a power off condition.
    "Jack B" <jslimp01nospam@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:eTMQ9Vp0KHA.4832@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
    > When does the little battery on the motherboard need to be replaced?
    >
    > Jack
    >
    >
     
  4. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 14:50:48 -0400, "Jack B"
    <jslimp01nospam@earthlink.net> wrote:

    > When does the little battery on the motherboard need to be replaced?




    When it fails. You will know when that begins because the clock will
    start to lose time whenever the machine is powered off.

    When does that happen? It depends entirely on the specific battery.
    Sometime as soon as a couple of months after purchase. Sometimes as
    much as five years later.

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  5. Lem

    Lem Flightless Bird

    No, it only *needs* to be replaced *after* it craps out.

    PA Bear [MS MVP] wrote:
    > Before it craps out.
    >
    > Jack B wrote:
    >> When does the little battery on the motherboard need to be replaced?
    >>
    >> Jack



    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
  6. Jack B

    Jack B Flightless Bird

    Thanks.

    My pc is 8½ yrs old so I probably ought to replace the battery. Is there
    anything in particular I should be aware of in doing that?


    Jack




    "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:h1hcr51pn0jk3jbb3f565qke2fcuthfucc@4ax.com...
    On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 14:50:48 -0400, "Jack B"
    <jslimp01nospam@earthlink.net> wrote:

    > When does the little battery on the motherboard need to be replaced?




    When it fails. You will know when that begins because the clock will
    start to lose time whenever the machine is powered off.

    When does that happen? It depends entirely on the specific battery.
    Sometime as soon as a couple of months after purchase. Sometimes as
    much as five years later.

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  7. Lem

    Lem Flightless Bird

    Jack B wrote:
    > Thanks.
    >
    > My pc is 8½ yrs old so I probably ought to replace the battery. Is there
    > anything in particular I should be aware of in doing that?
    >
    >
    > Jack
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:h1hcr51pn0jk3jbb3f565qke2fcuthfucc@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 14:50:48 -0400, "Jack B"
    > <jslimp01nospam@earthlink.net> wrote:
    >
    >> When does the little battery on the motherboard need to be replaced?

    >
    >
    >
    > When it fails. You will know when that begins because the clock will
    > start to lose time whenever the machine is powered off.
    >
    > When does that happen? It depends entirely on the specific battery.
    > Sometime as soon as a couple of months after purchase. Sometimes as
    > much as five years later.
    >


    Unplug the computer from the wall (you might also wait a few minutes
    after you unplug it) and discharge any static electricity from your body
    before working on the computer (and/or wear an antistatic wrist strap).
    Don't poke your fingers (or any metallic tool) in random parts of the
    computer.

    This is a FAQ: http://lmgtfy.com/?q=replace+cmos+battery



    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
  8. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    Simple common sense. Turn power off but leave line cord plugged in.
    (Provides static discharge path)
    Touch frame of computer before anything else (discharge static)
    "Jack B" <jslimp01nospam@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:%23dK9Sdq0KHA.4548@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > Thanks.
    >
    > My pc is 8½ yrs old so I probably ought to replace the battery. Is there
    > anything in particular I should be aware of in doing that?
    >
    >
    > Jack
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:h1hcr51pn0jk3jbb3f565qke2fcuthfucc@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 14:50:48 -0400, "Jack B"
    > <jslimp01nospam@earthlink.net> wrote:
    >
    >> When does the little battery on the motherboard need to be replaced?

    >
    >
    >
    > When it fails. You will know when that begins because the clock will
    > start to lose time whenever the machine is powered off.
    >
    > When does that happen? It depends entirely on the specific battery.
    > Sometime as soon as a couple of months after purchase. Sometimes as
    > much as five years later.
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    > Please Reply to the Newsgroup
    >
    >
     
  9. db

    db Flightless Bird

    as they say:

    "If it aint broke
    then don't fix it"

    --

    db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>
    DatabaseBen, Retired Professional
    - Systems Analyst
    - Database Developer
    - Accountancy
    - Veteran of the Armed Forces
    - Microsoft Partner
    - @hotmail.com
    ~~~~~~~~~~"share the nirvana" - dbZen

    >
    >


    "Jack B" <jslimp01nospam@earthlink.net> wrote in message news:#dK9Sdq0KHA.4548@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > Thanks.
    >
    > My pc is 8½ yrs old so I probably ought to replace the battery. Is there
    > anything in particular I should be aware of in doing that?
    >
    >
    > Jack
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:h1hcr51pn0jk3jbb3f565qke2fcuthfucc@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 14:50:48 -0400, "Jack B"
    > <jslimp01nospam@earthlink.net> wrote:
    >
    >> When does the little battery on the motherboard need to be replaced?

    >
    >
    >
    > When it fails. You will know when that begins because the clock will
    > start to lose time whenever the machine is powered off.
    >
    > When does that happen? It depends entirely on the specific battery.
    > Sometime as soon as a couple of months after purchase. Sometimes as
    > much as five years later.
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    > Please Reply to the Newsgroup
    >
    >
     
  10. NA

    NA Flightless Bird

    On 4/2/2010 5:19 PM EDT, Unknown wrote:
    > Simple common sense. Turn power off but leave line cord plugged in.
    > (Provides static discharge path)
    > Touch frame of computer before anything else (discharge static)


    Turning power off and leaving AC power cord plugged in is *not* a good
    idea. This does not completely remove power from the motherboard. The
    Standby +5VDC is still active even when the rest of the power supply
    lines are off. This is used to power the circuitry that controls the
    Power-On signal, and network card's Wake-On-LAN capabilities. Always
    unplug the AC cord is the common sense approach.
     
  11. Ken Blake, MVP

    Ken Blake, MVP Flightless Bird

    On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 16:58:30 -0400, "Jack B"
    <jslimp01nospam@earthlink.net> wrote:

    > Thanks.



    You're welcome. Glad to help.



    > My pc is 8½ yrs old so I probably ought to replace the battery.



    8½ years is an extraordinarily long time for a battery; you've been
    very fortunate.

    If you're not having problems with it, there's no rush to replace it.
    On the other hand, it can't last a whole lot longer. And since they
    are very cheap (under $5 US) and they are very easy to replace,
    there's no real downside to doing it now.


    > Is there
    > anything in particular I should be aware of in doing that?



    As I said, it's very easy. My only suggestion, if you've never done it
    before, is to get a friend who has done it to work with you and show
    you how.



    > "Ken Blake, MVP" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:h1hcr51pn0jk3jbb3f565qke2fcuthfucc@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 14:50:48 -0400, "Jack B"
    > <jslimp01nospam@earthlink.net> wrote:
    >
    > > When does the little battery on the motherboard need to be replaced?

    >
    >
    >
    > When it fails. You will know when that begins because the clock will
    > start to lose time whenever the machine is powered off.
    >
    > When does that happen? It depends entirely on the specific battery.
    > Sometime as soon as a couple of months after purchase. Sometimes as
    > much as five years later.
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    > Please Reply to the Newsgroup
    >


    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup
     
  12. Jose

    Jose Flightless Bird

    On Apr 2, 4:58 pm, "Jack B" <jslimp01nos...@earthlink.net> wrote:
    > Thanks.
    >
    > My pc is 8½ yrs old so I probably ought to replace the battery.  Is there
    > anything in particular I should be aware of in doing that?
    >
    > Jack
    >
    > "Ken Blake, MVP" <kbl...@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in messagenews:h1hcr51pn0jk3jbb3f565qke2fcuthfucc@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 14:50:48 -0400, "Jack B"
    >
    > <jslimp01nos...@earthlink.net> wrote:
    > > When does the little battery on the motherboard need to be replaced?

    >
    > When it fails. You will know when that begins because the clock will
    > start to lose time whenever the machine is powered off.
    >
    > When does that happen? It depends entirely on the specific battery.
    > Sometime as soon as a couple of months after purchase. Sometimes as
    > much as five years later.
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
    > Please Reply to the Newsgroup


    If you provide more information, we can perhaps help you locate a
    manual that will tell you exactly how to replace your battery. If it
    has been 8.5 years, that is a good life and if you have never changed
    it, it might be a good time to perform some other routine maintenance
    on your system so you can get another 8.5 years out of it.

    If you do nor provide more information, you will just get general
    ideas that might apply to your system. So far, you have gotten some
    conflicting information - which is the right information?

    Please provide additional information about your system:

    Click Start, Run and in the box enter:

    msinfo32

    Click OK, and when the System Summary info appears, click Edit, Select
    All, Copy and then paste the information back here.

    There will be some personal information (like System Name and User
    Name), and whatever appears to be private information to you, just
    delete it from the pasted information.

    This will minimize back and forth Q&A and eliminate guesswork.
     
  13. PA Bear [MS MVP]

    PA Bear [MS MVP] Flightless Bird

    Nit duly picked.

    Lem wrote:
    > No, it only *needs* to be replaced *after* it craps out.
    >
    > PA Bear [MS MVP] wrote:
    >> Before it craps out.
    >>
    >> Jack B wrote:
    >>> When does the little battery on the motherboard need to be replaced?
    >>>
    >>> Jack
     
  14. LD55ZRA

    LD55ZRA Flightless Bird

    Whenever you don't have any pigs to attack and you are looking for
    something to do.

    hth


    Jack B wrote:
    >
    > When does the little battery on the motherboard need to be replaced?
    >
    > Jack
     
  15. LVTravel

    LVTravel Flightless Bird

    "NA" <NA@na.org> wrote in message news:4BB6675A.9090901@na.org...
    > On 4/2/2010 5:19 PM EDT, Unknown wrote:
    >> Simple common sense. Turn power off but leave line cord plugged in.
    >> (Provides static discharge path)
    >> Touch frame of computer before anything else (discharge static)

    >
    > Turning power off and leaving AC power cord plugged in is *not* a good
    > idea. This does not completely remove power from the motherboard. The
    > Standby +5VDC is still active even when the rest of the power supply lines
    > are off. This is used to power the circuitry that controls the Power-On
    > signal, and network card's Wake-On-LAN capabilities. Always unplug the AC
    > cord is the common sense approach.


    Unknown is incorrect with the newer computers but where that information was
    obtained is that it was correct in older AT class computers that actually
    had the computer's power switch on the power supply. The newer computers
    where it is an electrically controlled switch (momentary contact type switch
    on the case) on the motherboard what unknown said can cause the computer to
    be fried quickly as you pointed out.

    Unplug it and also anything that could be sending a signal to the computer,
    such as self powered scanner, attached external drives, etc. They can
    "backfeed" through the signal cable into the computer's motherboard (granted
    this is not much current but...)

    I have created a ground strap with an alligator clip on one end that is
    clipped on the metal frame of the computer and a standard wall plug's ground
    that can be plugged in to provide a chassis ground. This is done, of
    course, after all has been unplugged.
     
  16. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    You are absolutely correct. I neglected to add the proper procedures when
    using a
    multiple outlet box with an on/off switch. I (dumbly) assumed poster had box
    with switch.
    Be more careful next time.
    "NA" <NA@na.org> wrote in message news:4BB6675A.9090901@na.org...
    > On 4/2/2010 5:19 PM EDT, Unknown wrote:
    >> Simple common sense. Turn power off but leave line cord plugged in.
    >> (Provides static discharge path)
    >> Touch frame of computer before anything else (discharge static)

    >
    > Turning power off and leaving AC power cord plugged in is *not* a good
    > idea. This does not completely remove power from the motherboard. The
    > Standby +5VDC is still active even when the rest of the power supply lines
    > are off. This is used to power the circuitry that controls the Power-On
    > signal, and network card's Wake-On-LAN capabilities. Always unplug the AC
    > cord is the common sense approach.
     
  17. Doum

    Doum Flightless Bird

    NA <NA@na.org> écrivait news:4BB6675A.9090901@na.org:

    > On 4/2/2010 5:19 PM EDT, Unknown wrote:
    >> Simple common sense. Turn power off but leave line cord plugged in.
    >> (Provides static discharge path)
    >> Touch frame of computer before anything else (discharge static)

    >
    > Turning power off and leaving AC power cord plugged in is *not* a good
    > idea. This does not completely remove power from the motherboard. The
    > Standby +5VDC is still active even when the rest of the power supply
    > lines are off. This is used to power the circuitry that controls the
    > Power-On signal, and network card's Wake-On-LAN capabilities. Always
    > unplug the AC cord is the common sense approach.


    My P4 and Core2Quad computers have Asus motherboards (retails) and Antec
    power supplies (retails).

    There are leds on the motherboards and ON/OFF (1/0) switches on the power
    supplies on the back of the towers.

    When I flip the power supplies to OFF (0), the leds on the motherboards go
    out and I am not able to turn on the computers from the power switch in
    front of the tower and I am pretty sure they would not power on using Wake-
    On-Lan or keyboard keystrokes. That tells me that there is NO power going
    to the MB and I can do maintenance such as replacing MB battery or memory
    on them without unplugging the power cord from the wall or power bar, I
    already replaced the battery on my P4 and added memory to the Core2Quad
    only turning the back switch OFF and no problems.

    The only time I unplug that cord, is when I take the towers outside to
    remove accumulated dust with air spray cans.

    Of course if the power supplies don't have the power switch like many OEM
    models, you need to unplug the power cord.
     
  18. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    Your computer is not a United States version. It probably is Canadian.
    Electrical specs vary from country to country.
    The US computers do not have on/off switches on the back of the power
    supplies.
    "Doum" <me@domain.net> wrote in message
    news:XnF9D5084EF467A3doumdomainnet@207.46.248.16...
    > NA <NA@na.org> écrivait news:4BB6675A.9090901@na.org:
    >
    >> On 4/2/2010 5:19 PM EDT, Unknown wrote:
    >>> Simple common sense. Turn power off but leave line cord plugged in.
    >>> (Provides static discharge path)
    >>> Touch frame of computer before anything else (discharge static)

    >>
    >> Turning power off and leaving AC power cord plugged in is *not* a good
    >> idea. This does not completely remove power from the motherboard. The
    >> Standby +5VDC is still active even when the rest of the power supply
    >> lines are off. This is used to power the circuitry that controls the
    >> Power-On signal, and network card's Wake-On-LAN capabilities. Always
    >> unplug the AC cord is the common sense approach.

    >
    > My P4 and Core2Quad computers have Asus motherboards (retails) and Antec
    > power supplies (retails).
    >
    > There are leds on the motherboards and ON/OFF (1/0) switches on the power
    > supplies on the back of the towers.
    >
    > When I flip the power supplies to OFF (0), the leds on the motherboards go
    > out and I am not able to turn on the computers from the power switch in
    > front of the tower and I am pretty sure they would not power on using
    > Wake-
    > On-Lan or keyboard keystrokes. That tells me that there is NO power going
    > to the MB and I can do maintenance such as replacing MB battery or memory
    > on them without unplugging the power cord from the wall or power bar, I
    > already replaced the battery on my P4 and added memory to the Core2Quad
    > only turning the back switch OFF and no problems.
    >
    > The only time I unplug that cord, is when I take the towers outside to
    > remove accumulated dust with air spray cans.
    >
    > Of course if the power supplies don't have the power switch like many OEM
    > models, you need to unplug the power cord.
     
  19. Doum

    Doum Flightless Bird

    I don't think so, check out the pictures on this page, they all have
    switches.

    http://www.newegg.com/Store/Category.aspx?Category=32&name=Power-Supplies

    I made sure to use the Newegg US page, the Canadian site is newegg.ca.

    By the the way Canadian and American electricity is the same, 60 hertz
    and some electricity used in US comes from Canada and some electricity
    used in Canada comes from US.


    "Unknown" <unknown@unknown.kom> écrivait
    news:#QPT0zB1KHA.5004@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl:

    > Your computer is not a United States version. It probably is Canadian.
    > Electrical specs vary from country to country.
    > The US computers do not have on/off switches on the back of the power
    > supplies.
    > "Doum" <me@domain.net> wrote in message
    > news:XnF9D5084EF467A3doumdomainnet@207.46.248.16...
    >> NA <NA@na.org> écrivait news:4BB6675A.9090901@na.org:
    >>
    >>> On 4/2/2010 5:19 PM EDT, Unknown wrote:
    >>>> Simple common sense. Turn power off but leave line cord plugged in.
    >>>> (Provides static discharge path)
    >>>> Touch frame of computer before anything else (discharge static)
    >>>
    >>> Turning power off and leaving AC power cord plugged in is *not* a
    >>> good idea. This does not completely remove power from the
    >>> motherboard. The Standby +5VDC is still active even when the rest
    >>> of the power supply lines are off. This is used to power the
    >>> circuitry that controls the Power-On signal, and network card's
    >>> Wake-On-LAN capabilities. Always unplug the AC cord is the common
    >>> sense approach.

    >>
    >> My P4 and Core2Quad computers have Asus motherboards (retails) and
    >> Antec power supplies (retails).
    >>
    >> There are leds on the motherboards and ON/OFF (1/0) switches on the
    >> power supplies on the back of the towers.
    >>
    >> When I flip the power supplies to OFF (0), the leds on the
    >> motherboards go out and I am not able to turn on the computers from
    >> the power switch in front of the tower and I am pretty sure they
    >> would not power on using Wake-
    >> On-Lan or keyboard keystrokes. That tells me that there is NO power
    >> going to the MB and I can do maintenance such as replacing MB battery
    >> or memory on them without unplugging the power cord from the wall or
    >> power bar, I already replaced the battery on my P4 and added memory
    >> to the Core2Quad only turning the back switch OFF and no problems.
    >>
    >> The only time I unplug that cord, is when I take the towers outside
    >> to remove accumulated dust with air spray cans.
    >>
    >> Of course if the power supplies don't have the power switch like many
    >> OEM models, you need to unplug the power cord.

    >
    >
    >
     
  20. Bruce Chambers

    Bruce Chambers Flightless Bird

    Unknown wrote:
    > Your computer is not a United States version. It probably is Canadian.
    > Electrical specs vary from country to country.
    > The US computers do not have on/off switches on the back of the power
    > supplies.


    They do if they have half-way decent (as not bargain brand Chinese
    crap) power supplies. I won't buy a computer that doesn't have a
    separate switch directly on the power supply, and for the very reasons
    under discussion in this thread: When working inside the computer case,
    it's essential to have a reliable path to ground/earth. The plugged in
    power cord is the surest means of achieving this.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

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    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     

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