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Backup and Restore Registry Knowledge

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by jack0233, Jan 19, 2010.

  1. jack0233

    jack0233 Flightless Bird

    I would like to know how to BACKUP a good registry, say the first one
    after a complete factory restore. AND THEN, if in the future I wanted
    that same BACKUP restored, pristinely, without any later additions of
    programs, registry entries updates and such. In other words, the same
    registry I saved after a factory recover, would be RESTORED.

    How can such a thing be accomplished? Thanks, jack
     
  2. Gordon

    Gordon Flightless Bird

    "jack0233" <jep0233@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:87d2e49c-a2fa-4ec8-966a-58499731675d@x15g2000vbr.googlegroups.com...
    > I would like to know how to BACKUP a good registry, say the first one
    > after a complete factory restore. AND THEN, if in the future I wanted
    > that same BACKUP restored, pristinely, without any later additions of
    > programs, registry entries updates and such. In other words, the same
    > registry I saved after a factory recover, would be RESTORED.
    >
    > How can such a thing be accomplished? Thanks, jack


    Do Start-Run-Regedit.
    Highlight Computer then do File-Export.

    To restore, just double click on the exported file (AFAIR)
     
  3. Bill in Co.

    Bill in Co. Flightless Bird

    Gordon wrote:
    > "jack0233" <jep0233@gmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:87d2e49c-a2fa-4ec8-966a-58499731675d@x15g2000vbr.googlegroups.com...
    >> I would like to know how to BACKUP a good registry, say the first one
    >> after a complete factory restore. AND THEN, if in the future I wanted
    >> that same BACKUP restored, pristinely, without any later additions of
    >> programs, registry entries updates and such. In other words, the same
    >> registry I saved after a factory recover, would be RESTORED.
    >>
    >> How can such a thing be accomplished? Thanks, jack

    >
    > Do Start-Run-Regedit.
    > Highlight Computer then do File-Export.
    >
    > To restore, just double click on the exported file (AFAIR)


    Better yet, use ERUNT.
    The method you suggested of exporting and importing will not really restore
    it to the exact state it was in previously, as it will merge entries with
    those already in there, which is not an exact restoration (although it may
    be close).
     
  4. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    jack0233 wrote:
    > I would like to know how to BACKUP a good registry, say the first one
    > after a complete factory restore. AND THEN, if in the future I wanted
    > that same BACKUP restored, pristinely, without any later additions of
    > programs, registry entries updates and such. In other words, the same
    > registry I saved after a factory recover, would be RESTORED.
    >
    > How can such a thing be accomplished? Thanks, jack


    This page covers all the different ways you can back up your registry:

    http://windowsxp.mvps.org/registry.htm

    But what you are asking about is problematic. If you install programs
    along the way and wish to revert to your original registry (that is, the
    registry as it was *before* you installed all those programs, there will
    be mismatches galore. That is because all your registry entries for all
    your installed programs will be gone once you restore the original
    registry!

    Perhaps, though, you are also interested in *not* keeping all those
    programs, that is, starting clean. If so, read on...

    Rather than back up the registry, you would be better advised to clone
    your C: drive. Then not only will your original original registry be
    restored, but there won't be any mismatches. You are looking for a
    solution where *everything* becomes pristine, correct? If so, yes,
    create an image of your entire C: drive in its pristine state. If you
    are looking for a free program to do this, DriveImageXML fits the bill
    nicely:

    http://www.runtime.org/driveimage-xml.htm

    If you are looking for something more sophisiticated, Acronis True Image
    Home is very popular:

    http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/

    This program has two advantages over the other program:

    1. You can also create incremental images (which saves time)

    2. You can even create perfectly cloned CDs if you wish.

    However, if all you want to do is create a one-time perfect snapshot,
    the first program is sufficient. But in order to restore the image, you
    would need to run Bart PE:

    http://www.nu2.nu/pebuilder/

    And in order to build this boot CD, you will need a full-fledged Windows
    XP installation CD first.

    Personally, I recommend Acronis. Once you have it, you could get into
    the habit of creating weely images of your drive. So if a problem comes
    up, you wouldn't need to "flatten and rebuild." Rather, all you would
    need to do is restore the most recent working image. Fast and easy! And
    if for some reason you wish to restore your very first pristine image,
    that option is always there for you (provided you save the image, of
    course!).

    An external hard drive is an excellent medium to store your image
    archives on, so it is highly recommended.

    Still, it's a good idea to _also_ use Windows System Restore and ERUNT.
    The more tools you have in your toolbox, the better! Sometimes a simple
    fix is all you need...
     
  5. Bill in Co.

    Bill in Co. Flightless Bird

    Daave wrote:
    > jack0233 wrote:
    >> I would like to know how to BACKUP a good registry, say the first one
    >> after a complete factory restore. AND THEN, if in the future I wanted
    >> that same BACKUP restored, pristinely, without any later additions of
    >> programs, registry entries updates and such. In other words, the same
    >> registry I saved after a factory recover, would be RESTORED.
    >>
    >> How can such a thing be accomplished? Thanks, jack

    >
    > This page covers all the different ways you can back up your registry:
    >
    > http://windowsxp.mvps.org/registry.htm
    >
    > But what you are asking about is problematic. If you install programs
    > along the way and wish to revert to your original registry (that is, the
    > registry as it was *before* you installed all those programs, there will
    > be mismatches galore. That is because all your registry entries for all
    > your installed programs will be gone once you restore the original
    > registry!


    Good call!
    In retrospect, I probably should have said anything short of a backup image
    or clone would be pretty useless - in this case (of going back that far).

    > Perhaps, though, you are also interested in *not* keeping all those
    > programs, that is, starting clean. If so, read on...
    >
    > Rather than back up the registry, you would be better advised to clone
    > your C: drive. Then not only will your original original registry be
    > restored, but there won't be any mismatches. You are looking for a
    > solution where *everything* becomes pristine, correct? If so, yes,
    > create an image of your entire C: drive in its pristine state. If you
    > are looking for a free program to do this, DriveImageXML fits the bill
    > nicely:
    >
    > http://www.runtime.org/driveimage-xml.htm
    >
    > If you are looking for something more sophisiticated, Acronis True Image
    > Home is very popular:
    >
    > http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/
    >
    > This program has two advantages over the other program:
    >
    > 1. You can also create incremental images (which saves time)
    >
    > 2. You can even create perfectly cloned CDs if you wish.
    >
    > However, if all you want to do is create a one-time perfect snapshot,
    > the first program is sufficient. But in order to restore the image, you
    > would need to run Bart PE:
    >
    > http://www.nu2.nu/pebuilder/
    >
    > And in order to build this boot CD, you will need a full-fledged Windows
    > XP installation CD first.
    >
    > Personally, I recommend Acronis. Once you have it, you could get into
    > the habit of creating weely images of your drive. So if a problem comes
    > up, you wouldn't need to "flatten and rebuild." Rather, all you would
    > need to do is restore the most recent working image. Fast and easy! And
    > if for some reason you wish to restore your very first pristine image,
    > that option is always there for you (provided you save the image, of
    > course!).
    >
    > An external hard drive is an excellent medium to store your image
    > archives on, so it is highly recommended.
    >
    > Still, it's a good idea to _also_ use Windows System Restore and ERUNT.
    > The more tools you have in your toolbox, the better! Sometimes a simple
    > fix is all you need...
     
  6. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    Bill in Co. wrote:
    > Daave wrote:
    >> jack0233 wrote:
    >>> I would like to know how to BACKUP a good registry, say the first
    >>> one after a complete factory restore. AND THEN, if in the future I
    >>> wanted that same BACKUP restored, pristinely, without any later
    >>> additions of programs, registry entries updates and such. In other
    >>> words, the same registry I saved after a factory recover, would be
    >>> RESTORED. How can such a thing be accomplished? Thanks, jack

    >>
    >> This page covers all the different ways you can back up your
    >> registry: http://windowsxp.mvps.org/registry.htm
    >>
    >> But what you are asking about is problematic. If you install programs
    >> along the way and wish to revert to your original registry (that is,
    >> the registry as it was *before* you installed all those programs,
    >> there will be mismatches galore. That is because all your registry
    >> entries for all your installed programs will be gone once you
    >> restore the original registry!

    >
    > Good call!


    I have my moments. :)
     
  7. ANONYMOUS

    ANONYMOUS Flightless Bird

    I think what you want is a complete backup of your HD not the Registry.

    Registry alone is not going to help you in shape or form. I suggest get
    hold of Norton Ghost 15 from your local AMAZON and use its recovery disk to
    back up your HD. They say "Cold Imaging lets you back up files without
    installing Ghost.". I have tested it and can confirm it is completely true.

    It costs $69 or less from online vendors but you can also download from
    crack sites.

    Let me repeat once again: REGISTRY ALONE OS NOT GOING TO PROTECT YOU IN THE
    EVENT OF DISASTER STRIKING YOU.

    hth

    "jack0233" <jep0233@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:87d2e49c-a2fa-4ec8-966a-58499731675d@x15g2000vbr.googlegroups.com...
    >I would like to know how to BACKUP a good registry, say the first one
    > after a complete factory restore. AND THEN, if in the future I wanted
    > that same BACKUP restored, pristinely, without any later additions of
    > programs, registry entries updates and such. In other words, the same
    > registry I saved after a factory recover, would be RESTORED.
    >
    > How can such a thing be accomplished? Thanks, jack
     
  8. dadiOH

    dadiOH Flightless Bird

    Daave wrote:
    > jack0233 wrote:
    >> I would like to know how to BACKUP a good registry, say the first one
    >> after a complete factory restore. AND THEN, if in the future I
    >> wanted that same BACKUP restored, pristinely, without any later
    >> additions of programs, registry entries updates and such. In other
    >> words, the same registry I saved after a factory recover, would be
    >> RESTORED. How can such a thing be accomplished? Thanks, jack

    >
    > This page covers all the different ways you can back up your registry:
    >
    > http://windowsxp.mvps.org/registry.htm
    >
    > But what you are asking about is problematic. If you install programs
    > along the way and wish to revert to your original registry (that is,
    > the registry as it was *before* you installed all those programs,
    > there will be mismatches galore. That is because all your registry
    > entries for all your installed programs will be gone once you restore
    > the original registry!
    >
    > Perhaps, though, you are also interested in *not* keeping all those
    > programs, that is, starting clean. If so, read on...
    >
    > Rather than back up the registry, you would be better advised to clone
    > your C: drive. Then not only will your original original registry be
    > restored, but there won't be any mismatches. You are looking for a
    > solution where *everything* becomes pristine, correct?


    It appears he already has it - the "factory restore".

    --

    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
  9. Unknown

    Unknown Flightless Bird

    Why would you want to do that? The registry is somewhat dynamic.
    You cannot simply restore the registry to a factory level at a future time
    and expect
    an operable system.

    "jack0233" <jep0233@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:87d2e49c-a2fa-4ec8-966a-58499731675d@x15g2000vbr.googlegroups.com...
    >I would like to know how to BACKUP a good registry, say the first one
    > after a complete factory restore. AND THEN, if in the future I wanted
    > that same BACKUP restored, pristinely, without any later additions of
    > programs, registry entries updates and such. In other words, the same
    > registry I saved after a factory recover, would be RESTORED.
    >
    > How can such a thing be accomplished? Thanks, jack
     
  10. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In news:87d2e49c-a2fa-4ec8-966a-58499731675d@x15g2000vbr.googlegroups.com,
    jack0233 <jep0233@gmail.com> typed:
    > I would like to know how to BACKUP a good registry, say the first one
    > after a complete factory restore. AND THEN, if in the future I wanted
    > that same BACKUP restored, pristinely, without any later additions of
    > programs, registry entries updates and such. In other words, the same
    > registry I saved after a factory recover, would be RESTORED.
    >
    > How can such a thing be accomplished? Thanks, jack


    An easy quick way is to use the native ntbackup.exe to back up the System
    State - one of the choices. That backs up the registry and all the necessary
    boot files and you can save as many different build versions as you want to.
    Restore is easy and simple.

    HTH,

    Twayne
     
  11. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In news:-O2pM1YVmKHA.4872@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl,
    Gordon <gordonbparker@yahoo.com> typed:
    > "jack0233" <jep0233@gmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:87d2e49c-a2fa-4ec8-966a-58499731675d@x15g2000vbr.googlegroups.com...
    >> I would like to know how to BACKUP a good registry, say the first one
    >> after a complete factory restore. AND THEN, if in the future I
    >> wanted that same BACKUP restored, pristinely, without any later
    >> additions of programs, registry entries updates and such. In other
    >> words, the same registry I saved after a factory recover, would be
    >> RESTORED. How can such a thing be accomplished? Thanks, jack

    >
    > Do Start-Run-Regedit.
    > Highlight Computer then do File-Export.
    >
    > To restore, just double click on the exported file (AFAIR)


    Uhh, no, don't restore the registry that way. It could create a mess in some
    cases. Erunt would be better than doing that or better yet back up the
    System State using XP's backup.

    HTH,

    Twayne
     
  12. Teflon

    Teflon Flightless Bird

    On Jan 19, 5:31 pm, "Daave" <da...@example.com> wrote:
    >
    > I have my moments. :)


    Daave, I have moments when I think I understand the whats, whens and
    hows of backing up stuff on my PC, but every time I read one of these
    threads that discusses all the variations and permutations of doing
    backups, I have other moments that make me wonder if I am really
    doing / using all of the 'right' tools at the 'right' time to minimize
    the negative impact of some hardware or software mishap.

    I've read enough of your posts to conclude that you know what you are
    talking about and that you have undoubtedly established a standard
    routine for backing up your stuff.

    So, if you would, I would appreciate your sharing your 'best practice'
    backup routine. What components do you backup? How often do you
    backup each component? What application(s) do you use to backup each
    of the various components? What media do you back up each component
    on? And anything else you feel is relevant to your backup scenario.

    Like a lot of folks, I am looking for a good recipe, not a grocery
    store. Thanks Daave.
     
  13. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    Teflon wrote:
    > On Jan 19, 5:31 pm, "Daave" <da...@example.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> I have my moments. :)

    >
    > Daave, I have moments when I think I understand the whats, whens and
    > hows of backing up stuff on my PC, but every time I read one of these
    > threads that discusses all the variations and permutations of doing
    > backups, I have other moments that make me wonder if I am really
    > doing / using all of the 'right' tools at the 'right' time to minimize
    > the negative impact of some hardware or software mishap.
    >
    > I've read enough of your posts to conclude that you know what you are
    > talking about and that you have undoubtedly established a standard
    > routine for backing up your stuff.
    >
    > So, if you would, I would appreciate your sharing your 'best practice'
    > backup routine. What components do you backup? How often do you
    > backup each component? What application(s) do you use to backup each
    > of the various components? What media do you back up each component
    > on? And anything else you feel is relevant to your backup scenario.
    >
    > Like a lot of folks, I am looking for a good recipe, not a grocery
    > store. Thanks Daave.


    Thanks for the kind words, Teflon.

    Actually, there are many good recipes. And since everybody has different
    needs, know that there is no one-size-fits-all method. Some people have
    extremely important data, which if lost, would cost them thousands of
    dollars (or more). Others don't have any data at all and use their PCs
    only for Web-related activities. Somehwhere in between would lie most
    people. Many have important data (including family photos and videos,
    etc. and office-related documents, etc.) that should defnitely be backed
    up. But perhaps this library of data doesn't change too often. Of
    course, if new data is being created every moment, a more rigorous
    backup strategy would need to be implemented.

    I see the term "backing up" (which is a vague term!) as comprising two
    aspects:

    1. Saving a recent working version of the operating system and all the
    programs, including customized settings and the most recent updates.

    2. Making sure data (e-mails, music, photos, videos, Word and Excel
    files, etc.) is safely backed up.

    I am actually in the process of changing my backup strategy. :) But for
    now, my method is very simple.

    I have only one partition on my hard drive. I use Acronis True Image
    Home to make a full image archive of my drive (which is stored on an
    external hard drive). Then once a week, I make incremental images, which
    don't take that long. Then again, it happens either over night or in the
    background, so it really doesn;t matter how long it takes. :) I've
    always favored manually doing things (even drove a manual transmission
    for a number of years!). For instance, I go to the Windows Update site
    several times a month and manually install critical updates. This isn't
    necessarily "best practices," mind you! For most others I recommend
    letting Automatic Updates handle this function. And I'll probably try
    that once again myself. But in the past, I recall having performance
    problems unless the AU service was turned off. So I just got into the
    habit of manually updating. It's probably time to revisit that strategy.
    :)

    Same with imaging. For a long time, my method was to make one large full
    image and subsequent weekly (manual) incremental images overnight. But
    lately I have finally started scheduling automatic incremental imaging
    sessions, and that works just fine.

    What I like about imaging one large partition is it's easy; there's very
    little to think about! And not is all my data backed up, but the OS,
    programs, etc. are perfectly preserved. So if something funky happens
    and my PC can't boot, all I need to do is restore the most recent image.

    Some people might need to run the incremental images once a day. It
    depends on the person's needs.

    But I think I might change my partitioning structure so that the OS and
    programs reside on C: and all the data reside on D:. I would image the
    C: drive and simply copy the data on D:. Again, Acronis can easily
    handle this situation.

    This page should help get you started if you are interested in Acronis:

    http://www.whatsabyte.com/P1/Acronis_image.htm

    There are also some tutorials on Youtube that might be helpful.

    There are other imaging programs, too. This is the one that I have used.
    Since I like it, I recommend it. But there are other good ones, too!

    If you choose Acronis (and there is a free trial version), there are
    some forums you can post to if you have specific questions. Here's one:

    http://forum.acronis.com/forums/acronis-discussion-forums/acronis-true-image-forum

    But I believe it is extremely user-friendly.

    Hmmm, I realize the above wasn't much of a "recipe," but I hope you find
    it helpful.
     
  14. Teflon

    Teflon Flightless Bird

    On Jan 21, 2:20 pm, "Daave" <da...@example.com> wrote:

    > Hmmm, I realize the above wasn't much of a "recipe," but I hope you find
    > it helpful.


    Thanks, it is, but I still have several questions.

    Aside from using ATI to make an image of the internal hard drive, do
    you also use something like ERUNT to separately backup the registry?
    If so, why? If not, why not?

    Do you periodically consolidate those incremental images? Do you
    grandfather your images?

    Since you only have the one partition on your internal HD, I guess
    making an image of that internal HD on an external HDD would be all
    the safeguarding (all inclusive term) you need for both OS and data.
    However, should you create a second partition for data, would you
    still use ATI to image that partition to the external HDD as well?
    Are there better apps for backing up and then syncing data files on an
    external HDD?

    Manual transmission, me too. I knew there was something very
    practical about you.
     
  15. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    Teflon wrote:
    > On Jan 21, 2:20 pm, "Daave" <da...@example.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Hmmm, I realize the above wasn't much of a "recipe," but I hope you
    >> find it helpful.

    >
    > Thanks, it is, but I still have several questions.
    >
    > Aside from using ATI to make an image of the internal hard drive, do
    > you also use something like ERUNT to separately backup the registry?
    > If so, why? If not, why not?


    One of these days, I plan on doing that. As long as you have a validated
    up-to-date image, you're pretty much covered, though. I also have recent
    restore points in Windows System Restore as a fallback. I feel like I'm
    plenty covered. Still, like I said, I do plan using ERUNT in the future
    as yet another fallback. I doubt I would *ever* get into a situation
    where an image or restore point would fail me. Still, it can't hurt to
    have one more layer of security.

    The reason I have been slow to getting around with playing with ERUNT is
    Windows System Restore already backs up the registry. And I have had
    success with it the two or three times I used it. Sometimes all that is
    needed to solve a problem is to run System Restore. It is certainly
    quicker that restoring an image! Although *very* unlikely, SR *could*
    fail, so ERUNT *could* be of assistance in that instance (and in the
    *HIGHLY* unlikely event that there is also something wrong with the
    validated image, ERUNT could prove to be the only solution short of a
    Repair or Clean Install). But like I said, I feel very covered currently
    with *both* strategies (recent validated image *and* recent restore
    points), so I'm in no rush to add yet another layer of protection.
    Still, I do see its value.

    > Do you periodically consolidate those incremental images? Do you
    > grandfather your images?


    Every few months, I'll create a brand new full image and then subsequent
    incremental images to *that*. After a while, I'll delete the old full
    image and *its* associated incremental images. I have no set schedule;
    if the external hard drive is getting full, the old unneeded stuff gets
    deleted to make room for the new stuff.

    > Since you only have the one partition on your internal HD, I guess
    > making an image of that internal HD on an external HDD would be all
    > the safeguarding (all inclusive term) you need for both OS and data.


    Correct. This is the easiest method, and everything is indeed
    safeguarded.

    > However, should you create a second partition for data, would you
    > still use ATI to image that partition to the external HDD as well?
    > Are there better apps for backing up and then syncing data files on an
    > external HDD?


    No. Instead of creating an image archive, you can create a data archive
    (with ATI). And you can create incremental data archives, too. Some
    people instead use Windows XP's own ntbackup program; that works, too.
    Others use Karen's Replicator:

    http://www.karenware.com/powertools/ptreplicator.asp

    (I haven't used this particular program, but I have heard good reviews.)

    > Manual transmission, me too. I knew there was something very
    > practical about you.


    :)
     
  16. Bill in Co.

    Bill in Co. Flightless Bird

    Daave wrote:
    > Teflon wrote:
    >> On Jan 21, 2:20 pm, "Daave" <da...@example.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Hmmm, I realize the above wasn't much of a "recipe," but I hope you
    >>> find it helpful.

    >>
    >> Thanks, it is, but I still have several questions.
    >>
    >> Aside from using ATI to make an image of the internal hard drive, do
    >> you also use something like ERUNT to separately backup the registry?
    >> If so, why? If not, why not?

    >
    > One of these days, I plan on doing that. As long as you have a validated
    > up-to-date image, you're pretty much covered, though. I also have recent
    > restore points in Windows System Restore as a fallback. I feel like I'm
    > plenty covered. Still, like I said, I do plan using ERUNT in the future
    > as yet another fallback. I doubt I would *ever* get into a situation
    > where an image or restore point would fail me. Still, it can't hurt to
    > have one more layer of security.
    >
    > The reason I have been slow to getting around with playing with ERUNT is
    > Windows System Restore already backs up the registry. And I have had
    > success with it the two or three times I used it. Sometimes all that is
    > needed to solve a problem is to run System Restore. It is certainly
    > quicker that restoring an image!


    Dave, using ERUNT is a lot faster than using System Restore, PLUS it leaves
    ALL other files on your hard drive alone: it ONLY restores the registry and
    its associated files, which is both an advantage and a disadvantage.

    System Restore is definitely more thorough, but System Restore can - and
    will - remove any monitored file types (like exe) recently added since the
    last restore point that were NOT stored in protected locations, like My
    Documents. And sometimes that can be a PIA.
     
  17. dadiOH

    dadiOH Flightless Bird

    Daave wrote:
    > Teflon wrote:
    >> However, should you create a second partition for data, would you
    >> still use ATI to image that partition to the external HDD as well?
    >> Are there better apps for backing up and then syncing data files on
    >> an external HDD?

    >
    > No. Instead of creating an image archive, you can create a data
    > archive (with ATI). And you can create incremental data archives,
    > too. Some people instead use Windows XP's own ntbackup program; that
    > works, too. Others use Karen's Replicator:
    >
    > http://www.karenware.com/powertools/ptreplicator.asp
    >
    > (I haven't used this particular program, but I have heard good
    > reviews.)


    It is one I used to use a lot and I like it. My version is an old one and
    one can only back up one "job" at a time (a "job" is any single drive or
    folder, don't know if the newest can do multiple or not).; no matter, one
    can have as many "jobs" as one wishes and multiple jobs can be run at the
    same time; the jobs can be scheduled to run automatically at user set
    intervals.

    Another handy backupper is My Own Backup (MO8). It is nice because the
    backup can be compressed if one wishes. No automatic run/schedule though.
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=mob+v2.1&btnG=Google+Search&aq=f&aql=&aqi=&oq=

    Neither of these takes the place of an imager. IMO, they are best used to
    backup user data...data that is more likely to change than is the rest of
    the sysyem. Make an image when there are material changes to the system,
    back up user data more frequently.

    I keep a Notepad (Metapad, actually) LIFO log of what I do to the system.
    Install or remove a program? Make a log entry of date and program name.
    Made an image? Make a log entry of date. If the log is kept on a drive
    other than the OS drive - a USB thumb drive is fine - and one has to restore
    an image one can then refer to the log to see what if any changes were not
    in the image that was restored.

    ERUNT is handy, IMO, saved my butt more than once.

    --

    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
  18. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    Bill in Co. wrote:
    > Daave wrote:
    >> Teflon wrote:
    >>> On Jan 21, 2:20 pm, "Daave" <da...@example.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Hmmm, I realize the above wasn't much of a "recipe," but I hope you
    >>>> find it helpful.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks, it is, but I still have several questions.
    >>>
    >>> Aside from using ATI to make an image of the internal hard drive, do
    >>> you also use something like ERUNT to separately backup the registry?
    >>> If so, why? If not, why not?

    >>
    >> One of these days, I plan on doing that. As long as you have a
    >> validated up-to-date image, you're pretty much covered, though. I
    >> also have recent restore points in Windows System Restore as a
    >> fallback. I feel like I'm plenty covered. Still, like I said, I do
    >> plan using ERUNT in the future as yet another fallback. I doubt I
    >> would *ever* get into a situation where an image or restore point
    >> would fail me. Still, it can't hurt to have one more layer of
    >> security. The reason I have been slow to getting around with playing
    >> with
    >> ERUNT is Windows System Restore already backs up the registry. And I
    >> have had success with it the two or three times I used it. Sometimes
    >> all that is needed to solve a problem is to run System Restore. It
    >> is certainly quicker that restoring an image!

    >
    > Dave, using ERUNT is a lot faster than using System Restore,


    I don't doubt that. Still, SR takes only a minute or two, so I can
    handle the wait. :)

    > PLUS it
    > leaves ALL other files on your hard drive alone: it ONLY restores the
    > registry and its associated files, which is both an advantage and a
    > disadvantage.
    > System Restore is definitely more thorough, but System Restore can -
    > and will - remove any monitored file types (like exe) recently added
    > since the last restore point that were NOT stored in protected
    > locations, like My Documents. And sometimes that can be a PIA.


    Not a concern of mine because all my installation files (yes, I like to
    keep them) reside in a directory inside My Documents.

    ERUNT has its value, no doubt. And eventually I will get around to using
    it. :)
     

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