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Anybody using OpenOffice 2.04 (Linux) under Xandros?

Discussion in 'Notebooks' started by BillW50, Jan 20, 2010.

  1. BillW50

    BillW50 Flightless Bird

    In news:h5avm51rir2tfehum7bfc7i5km0j176p2o@4ax.com,
    AJL typed on Sun, 07 Feb 2010 23:31:11 -0700:
    > "BillW50" <BillW50@aol.kom> wrote:
    >
    >> AJL typed on Sun, 07 Feb 2010 19:18:12 -0700:

    >
    >> The Ubuntu manual states that it only does MP3. WMA, and AAC formats.

    >
    > If you need a format that's not included then more formats can be
    > added, but then I repeat myself.


    WMA support is included with Ubuntu. But it still doesn't work. Then
    what? Btw, it works under Xandros though.

    >> but I have nothing in AAC format to test.
    >> Maybe that one is dead too for all I know.

    >
    > Complaining about a format you haven't even tried??


    No, I am complaining that there are only two formats left. Since WMA
    format doesn't work.

    >>>> I am getting a lot of
    >>>> screen flashes with it under Ubuntu.
    >>>
    >>> Screen flashes? Hey, I'll bet you have a defective 'flash' drive.
    >>> Boy that spoils your perfect record huh... ;)

    >>
    >> Then I install it on a hard drive and the same dang thing happens,
    >> then what? Just more broken promises?

    >
    > That was a joke Bill. *Flashes* on the screen, *flash drive*...get it?
    > No I suppose not. It's become apparent to me that you really don't
    > want to get Linux working, but seem to just want to complain about it.
    > Perhaps a shrink could help but I obviously can't. So you have the
    > last word on the subject...


    Look, maybe you don't understand. I would LOVE to use Linux. How many
    times do I have to say this? But Linux will only do browsing, email, and
    newsgroups for me. Oh and play some multimedia formats. That is all!
    Damn, that isn't so good. Many PDAs does this and far more. Why would
    anybody in their right mind want to down grade their computers for?

    --
    Bill
    Asus EEE PC 702G8 ~ 2GB RAM ~ 16GB-SDHC
    Windows XP SP2
     
  2. the wharf rat

    the wharf rat Flightless Bird

    In article <hkrrl4$49p$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
    BillW50 <BillW50@aol.kom> wrote:
    >
    >WMA support is included with Ubuntu. But it still doesn't work. Then
    >what? Btw, it works under Xandros though.
    >


    Have you RTFM? This is from

    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=413624

    -------- Enabling Multimedia in Feisty (HOW-TO) Video/audio codec,
    flash, mp3, dvd playback, and win32 Codec install for Feisty Fawn for
    beginners. If your a new user, copy and paste commands into the
    terminal, should be relatively easy from that point forward.

    For mp3, etc.
    Open up Add/Remove programs from your Application bar.

    Go to Sound&Video and Find and Check all of the packages below (easily
    done by searching for gstreamer)

    * "GStreamer ffmpeg video plugin"
    * "GStreamer extra plugins"
    * "GStreamer plugins for aac, xvid, mpeg2, faad"
    * "GStreamer plugins for mms, wavpack, quicktime, musepack"


    Then go to Other subsection of Add/Remove and find

    * "Ubuntu restricted extras"

    For Flash support

    While under the "Other" section enable

    * "Macromedia Flash plugin"

    For DVD Playback and Win32 Codecs

    Edit the file /etc/apt/sources.list using either of the following commands in a terminal:

    $gksudo gedit /etc/apt/sources.list

    to open it in the GUI text editor

    or

    $sudo vim /etc/apt/sources.list

    to open it in the Vim command line text editor

    Add the following lines to add the Medibuntu repository to the file:

    ## Medibuntu - Ubuntu 7.04 "feisty fawn" Please report any bug on
    ## https://launchpad.net/products/medibuntu/+bugs deb
    http://packages.medibuntu.org/ feisty free non-free

    Import the gpg key for the Medibuntu repository to ensure that the
    packages are installed without warnings/errors regarding trust: To do
    this, run the following command from the terminal:

    wget -q http://packages.medibuntu.org/medibuntu-key.gpg -O- | sudo
    apt-key add -

    Now update the local list of packages to get the list of packages from
    the newly added Medibuntu repository:

    In a terminal execute the following command:

    sudo apt-get update

    Now you can install libdvdcss2 and w32codecs using the following command:

    sudo apt-get install libdvdcss2 w32codecs

    >No, I am complaining that there are only two formats left. Since WMA
    >format doesn't work.


    You mean since you haven't bothered to get it to work.
     
  3. S. Fishpaste

    S. Fishpaste Flightless Bird

    On Thu, 4 Feb 2010 09:43:17 -0600, BillW50 in comp.sys.laptops wrote:
    > Both Xandros and Ubuntu uses Debian applications. So what am I missing?


    A lot of distros use Debian applications; Debian is a well engineered
    distro and not constrained by commercial realities in that they only
    release an application as stable; when it's truly stable and with
    minimal bugs.

    But; it depends where any distro gets their debian applications -- Just
    because they are a *.deb doesn't necessarily mean that they were
    manufactured or engineered by debian. Debian has many distros and is
    the only distro that supports pretty much every architecture known to
    man.

    >> Linux the kernel & GNU are often used in far more demanding roles than
    >> any MSFT Windows OS is/are. Trust me when I say that your NSA sure as
    >> hell doesn't use MSFT Windows! They use hardened Linux old boy.

    >
    > While rootkits are relatively new in the Windows world, they have been
    > plaguing *nix users for almost the past 20 years now.


    No they haven't. Most UNIX administrators know how to lock down a box.
    Most exploits come from enabled web services.

    >> First thing many of us UNIX do is install GNU applications on
    >> other Operating Systems <ie> always goes on any Solaris installation
    >> I'm responsible for. That's because many of the GNU applications are
    >> written damn well. If you have experience, you should have known this.

    >
    > Don't use Solaris, sorry. Nor does 99.9% of the world does either.


    So?! Since when does many mean quality? You're using the same old
    tired arguments that only a troll uses. Get a fricking life! Stay with
    windows; I don't give a flying crap what you use.

    >> Of course if your only experience has been Xandros etc., and many of
    >> the projects on Freshmeat or SourceForge, then you're forgiven for not
    >> knowing what you're talking about. Most of the projects on Freshmeat
    >> are written by compsi students, so they're not expected to be at the
    >> height of their competency. That's why they're in school.

    >
    > I've used Xandros for the last couple of years because it works. While
    > Ubuntu and Puppy Linux does not. Well okay 9.04 does work, but like all
    > Linux I've tried, are terrible in the multimedia department. At least my
    > three year old Xandros can handle more multimedia file types than Ubuntu
    > 9.04 can so far.


    The issue is between the chair and the keyboard Bill.

    >>>> If you have UNIX experience it's much easier -- But as a
    >>>> programmer you sure don't seem very familiar with source files ...
    >>>
    >>> That was years ago when all we had was WordStar, dBase, and
    >>> SuperCalc. If you wanted anything else, you had to write your own
    >>> programs. And I sure did a lot back then. Then when applications
    >>> became plentiful, I was more than happy to let others do it. :p

    >>
    >> Well I wrote machine code circa 35 years ago and am still doing so
    >> today.

    >
    > Are you sure you are writing machine code? I did that many years ago
    > too. But everybody I knew gave that up about 30 years ago. And they use
    > assembly language instead of machine code. Which is more or less the
    > same thing. Although assembly is a program language that generates
    > machine code for you. Which is much easier to use than to think in 1's
    > and 0's, and all of those logic gates.


    No I write machine code, simply because the applications I write are
    used in situations that if they fail it would be catastrophic; Think of
    aeronautics and military systems. No top level languages used!

    Now stop being a troll and either get it working or STFU! There is
    plenty of how-to's around the net; just use your favourite search
    engine.

    O BTW look at FLAC it's far better than mp3 and along with OGG is
    supported heavily on GNU/Linux.
     
  4. S. Fishpaste

    S. Fishpaste Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 07 Feb 2010 14:58:42 -0700, AJL in comp.sys.laptops wrote:
    > "BillW50" <BillW50@aol.kom> wrote:


    [ ...]

    >>I call Linux as a glorified PDA OS. Although it seems like the iPhone can
    >>actually do more than Linux can nowadays.

    >
    > A troll baiting statement and beneath you Bill. If you really want to
    > learn how to do something you can't figure out ask a specific
    > question. Preferably in an Ubuntu group. If you just religiously hate
    > Linux why are you torturing yourself?
    >
    >>I mean that Ubuntu tab desktop that has that Favorites tab. Xandros in
    >>Easy Mode has the same thing. And an utility to add or remove
    >>applications from this tab. And I must have deleted the utility since I
    >>don't see it anymore.

    >
    > Again, you may want to try the *full* Ubuntu install. There are no
    > tabs on my (Gnome) desktop. The built in package manager on my version
    > is called the Ubuntu Software Center and is accessed from the
    > Applications menu.


    I've told him that a number of time -- It appears that he doesn't want
    his experience in Linux to work, so he avoids the instructions from
    people that are considerably experienced in the Unices.

    I use all 4 operating systems daily, so it's not a religous experience
    for me. They all have their best points. One just has to spend some
    time learning each.
     
  5. the wharf rat

    the wharf rat Flightless Bird

    In article <slrnhn8j2c.f70.SDA@laptop.sweetpig.dyndns.org>,
    S. Fishpaste <marathon.durandal@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >No they haven't. Most UNIX administrators know how to lock down a box.
    >Most exploits come from enabled web services.
    >


    Rootkits are rare in a Unix environment as an entry point. You
    do seem them sometimes as a followup to another exploit. A typical scenario is
    that a poorly coded web application allows a command line to be executed
    as the web user, and that's exploited to yield root permissions which are
    in turn used to install other applications which may include "rootkits".

    Root exploits in general are pretty rare in Unix. Most programs run
    as a non root user so exploiting them doesn't get you root. There are a few
    that pop up now and then... It's a fundamentally more secure environment
    because of its simplicity.

    >The issue is between the chair and the keyboard Bill.


    Yup. I use Xine on an old AMD box to play movies while I do other
    stuff. Works fine.
     
  6. BillW50

    BillW50 Flightless Bird

    In news:slrnhn8i81.f70.SDA@laptop.sweetpig.dyndns.org,
    S. Fishpaste typed on Thu, 11 Feb 2010 13:14:25 -0500:
    > On Sun, 07 Feb 2010 14:58:42 -0700, AJL in comp.sys.laptops wrote:
    >> "BillW50" <BillW50@aol.kom> wrote:

    >
    > [ ...]
    >
    >>> I call Linux as a glorified PDA OS. Although it seems like the
    >>> iPhone can actually do more than Linux can nowadays.

    >>
    >> A troll baiting statement and beneath you Bill. If you really want to
    >> learn how to do something you can't figure out ask a specific
    >> question. Preferably in an Ubuntu group. If you just religiously hate
    >> Linux why are you torturing yourself?
    >>
    >>> I mean that Ubuntu tab desktop that has that Favorites tab. Xandros
    >>> in Easy Mode has the same thing. And an utility to add or remove
    >>> applications from this tab. And I must have deleted the utility
    >>> since I don't see it anymore.

    >>
    >> Again, you may want to try the *full* Ubuntu install. There are no
    >> tabs on my (Gnome) desktop. The built in package manager on my
    >> version is called the Ubuntu Software Center and is accessed from the
    >> Applications menu.

    >
    > I've told him that a number of time -- It appears that he doesn't want
    > his experience in Linux to work, so he avoids the instructions from
    > people that are considerably experienced in the Unices.


    Nope, that isn't it Fishpaste. It is that I am a very busy guy and Linux
    isn't a priority. So it has to wait until I have some more time.

    > I use all 4 operating systems daily, so it's not a religous experience
    > for me. They all have their best points. One just has to spend some
    > time learning each.


    Learning them isn't a big deal for me. The big deal is the bottom line
    after spending all of the time getting them working. So what can you do
    with it after all is said and done? As far as I can tell, anybody using
    Linux instead of Windows is losing abilities and not gaining any. Thus
    it would be a downgrade for most computer users. So what is the point?
    Why would you want to take a machine that runs Windows well and put
    Linux on it and end up with something that any smart phone can do? I
    mean seriously?

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era) - Windows XP SP3
     
  7. BillW50

    BillW50 Flightless Bird

    In news:hl1oc8$p0s$1@reader2.panix.com,
    the wharf rat typed on Thu, 11 Feb 2010 20:12:56 +0000 (UTC):
    > In article <slrnhn8j2c.f70.SDA@laptop.sweetpig.dyndns.org>,
    > S. Fishpaste <marathon.durandal@gmail.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> No they haven't. Most UNIX administrators know how to lock down a
    >> box. Most exploits come from enabled web services.
    >>

    >
    > Rootkits are rare in a Unix environment as an entry point. You
    > do seem them sometimes as a followup to another exploit. A typical
    > scenario is that a poorly coded web application allows a command line
    > to be executed as the web user, and that's exploited to yield root
    > permissions which are in turn used to install other applications which
    > may include "rootkits".
    >
    > Root exploits in general are pretty rare in Unix. Most programs run
    > as a non root user so exploiting them doesn't get you root. There
    > are a few that pop up now and then... It's a fundamentally more
    > secure environment because of its simplicity.


    I've never written a rootkit. But from what I understand, they wait
    until one user logs in with root (administrative) control. Now they are
    free to install and do anything they want too since they have full
    control.

    So to stop a rootkit, no user can use root level access. Well sounds
    good on paper, but you can't install any applications or anything
    without root access control.

    >> The issue is between the chair and the keyboard Bill.

    >
    > Yup. I use Xine on an old AMD box to play movies while I do other
    > stuff. Works fine.


    I use an old Toshiba 2595XDVD ('99 era) running Windows 98 with a 400MHz
    Celeron with only 64GB of RAM to watch DVD movies on. Can Xine do this
    on the same machine?

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era) - Windows XP SP3
     
  8. BillW50

    BillW50 Flightless Bird

    In news:slrnhn8j2c.f70.SDA@laptop.sweetpig.dyndns.org,
    S. Fishpaste typed on Thu, 11 Feb 2010 13:28:28 -0500:
    > On Thu, 4 Feb 2010 09:43:17 -0600, BillW50 in comp.sys.laptops wrote:
    >> Both Xandros and Ubuntu uses Debian applications. So what am I
    >> missing?

    >
    > A lot of distros use Debian applications; Debian is a well engineered
    > distro and not constrained by commercial realities in that they only
    > release an application as stable; when it's truly stable and with
    > minimal bugs.
    >
    > But; it depends where any distro gets their debian applications --
    > Just because they are a *.deb doesn't necessarily mean that they were
    > manufactured or engineered by debian. Debian has many distros and is
    > the only distro that supports pretty much every architecture known to
    > man.


    Far enough.

    >>> Linux the kernel & GNU are often used in far more demanding roles
    >>> than any MSFT Windows OS is/are. Trust me when I say that your NSA
    >>> sure as hell doesn't use MSFT Windows! They use hardened Linux old
    >>> boy.

    >>
    >> While rootkits are relatively new in the Windows world, they have
    >> been plaguing *nix users for almost the past 20 years now.

    >
    > No they haven't. Most UNIX administrators know how to lock down a box.
    > Most exploits come from enabled web services.


    Really? That isn't what I hear from Google searches. So how does most
    UNIX administrators lock down their systems?

    >>> First thing many of us UNIX do is install GNU applications on
    >>> other Operating Systems <ie> always goes on any Solaris installation
    >>> I'm responsible for. That's because many of the GNU applications are
    >>> written damn well. If you have experience, you should have known
    >>> this.

    >>
    >> Don't use Solaris, sorry. Nor does 99.9% of the world does either.

    >
    > So?! Since when does many mean quality? You're using the same old
    > tired arguments that only a troll uses. Get a fricking life! Stay with
    > windows; I don't give a flying crap what you use.


    For starters, I have been here for many years helping laptop users to
    get their laptops working. Trolling is beneath me and I have no interest
    in doing so. I just say that truth and a few people think I am trolling.
    Big difference actually.

    >>> Of course if your only experience has been Xandros etc., and many of
    >>> the projects on Freshmeat or SourceForge, then you're forgiven for
    >>> not knowing what you're talking about. Most of the projects on
    >>> Freshmeat are written by compsi students, so they're not expected
    >>> to be at the height of their competency. That's why they're in
    >>> school.

    >>
    >> I've used Xandros for the last couple of years because it works.
    >> While Ubuntu and Puppy Linux does not. Well okay 9.04 does work, but
    >> like all Linux I've tried, are terrible in the multimedia
    >> department. At least my three year old Xandros can handle more
    >> multimedia file types than Ubuntu
    >> 9.04 can so far.

    >
    > The issue is between the chair and the keyboard Bill.


    Yes, Ubuntu is blameless and it is perfect, isn't that so? There has
    never been a single issue with Ubuntu, no updates, and Ubuntu v1.0 is
    the same as v9.10. And v9.10 is no different than the later v20, now is
    it?

    >>>>> If you have UNIX experience it's much easier -- But as a
    >>>>> programmer you sure don't seem very familiar with source files ...
    >>>>
    >>>> That was years ago when all we had was WordStar, dBase, and
    >>>> SuperCalc. If you wanted anything else, you had to write your own
    >>>> programs. And I sure did a lot back then. Then when applications
    >>>> became plentiful, I was more than happy to let others do it. :p
    >>>
    >>> Well I wrote machine code circa 35 years ago and am still doing so
    >>> today.

    >>
    >> Are you sure you are writing machine code? I did that many years ago
    >> too. But everybody I knew gave that up about 30 years ago. And they
    >> use assembly language instead of machine code. Which is more or less
    >> the same thing. Although assembly is a program language that
    >> generates machine code for you. Which is much easier to use than to
    >> think in 1's and 0's, and all of those logic gates.

    >
    > No I write machine code, simply because the applications I write are
    > used in situations that if they fail it would be catastrophic; Think
    > of aeronautics and military systems. No top level languages used!


    Okay Fishpaste, I am calling your bluff! I know what machine code looks
    like. So if you will show us just 256 bytes of machine code, then we
    will talk. And add comments to what this code is doing. This should be
    no problem for somebody who uses machine code for the past 30 plus
    years.

    > Now stop being a troll and either get it working or STFU! There is
    > plenty of how-to's around the net; just use your favourite search
    > engine.


    No trolling from me, I just say the truth and some think it is hell.

    > O BTW look at FLAC it's far better than mp3 and along with OGG is
    > supported heavily on GNU/Linux.


    I've used OGG sometimes for my own purposes and it is as good as Windows
    Media format as far as I am concern. But I am not interested in
    converting my hundreds of thousands of Windows Media format worth of
    files into something else. FLAC is also good, but FLAC (and sometimes
    OGG) files cannot be played back with most portable audio hardware. So
    they are pretty useless to me as well. My three iRiver T10 MPEG players
    can only play MP3, OGG, and WMA files for example. And FLAC is still no
    match for quality like WAV (Windows) and AIFF (Mac) files. And if you
    have any files using DRM (like I do), Linux can't play them at all.

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era) - Windows XP SP3
     
  9. the wharf rat

    the wharf rat Flightless Bird

    In article <hl1q40$4rs$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
    BillW50 <BillW50@aol.kom> wrote:
    >
    >I've never written a rootkit. But from what I understand, they wait
    >until one user logs in with root (administrative) control. Now they are
    >free to install and do anything they want too since they have full
    >control.


    It doesn't work that way.

    >I use an old Toshiba 2595XDVD ('99 era) running Windows 98 with a 400MHz


    Doesn't that thing have a hardware mpeg processor, the add on board
    that's under the bottom of the keyboard...
     
  10. the wharf rat

    the wharf rat Flightless Bird

    In article <hl1tdg$3ni$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
    BillW50 <BillW50@aol.kom> wrote:
    >>
    >> No they haven't. Most UNIX administrators know how to lock down a box.
    >> Most exploits come from enabled web services.

    >
    >Really? That isn't what I hear from Google searches. So how does most
    >

    How do you think linux exploits happen?



    >For starters, I have been here for many years helping laptop users to


    One of my first laptops had Solaris. It was a tadpole, Still have it.
     
  11. BillW50

    BillW50 Flightless Bird

    In news:hl21av$qg6$1@reader2.panix.com,
    the wharf rat typed on Thu, 11 Feb 2010 22:45:51 +0000 (UTC):
    > In article <hl1q40$4rs$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
    > BillW50 <BillW50@aol.kom> wrote:
    >>
    >> I've never written a rootkit. But from what I understand, they wait
    >> until one user logs in with root (administrative) control. Now they
    >> are free to install and do anything they want too since they have
    >> full control.

    >
    > It doesn't work that way.


    Really? Tell us how rootkits really works then.

    >> I use an old Toshiba 2595XDVD ('99 era) running Windows 98 with a
    >> 400MHz

    >
    > Doesn't that thing have a hardware mpeg processor, the add on board
    > that's under the bottom of the keyboard...


    Nope, I don't think so. As a 400MHz Celeron is the lowest that you can
    go to get decent DVD playback from all I know under Windows. My
    experience with Linux, you need three or more times the processor power
    for the same.

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era) - Windows XP SP3
     
  12. BillW50

    BillW50 Flightless Bird

    In news:hl1q40$4rs$1@news.eternal-september.org,
    BillW50 typed on Thu, 11 Feb 2010 14:42:38 -0600:
    > I use an old Toshiba 2595XDVD ('99 era) running Windows 98 with a
    > 400MHz Celeron with only 64GB of RAM to watch DVD movies on. Can Xine
    > do this on the same machine?


    I mean 64MB of RAM. 64GB of RAM I wish. lol

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era) - Windows XP SP3
     
  13. the wharf rat

    the wharf rat Flightless Bird

    In article <hl26bc$nts$1@news.eternal-september.org>,
    BillW50 <BillW50@aol.kom> wrote:
    >
    >Really? Tell us how rootkits really works then.
    >


    A rootkit is a collection of software that you install after "rooting"
    a system - gaining root or administrator access. It's purpose is to hide
    the compromise from the real administrators. A rootkit doesn't grant access.

    >Nope, I don't think so. As a 400MHz Celeron is the lowest that you can
    >go to get decent DVD playback from all I know under Windows. My


    I don't have anything nearly that old to test on. I have a couple
    of Dell CS400s but they don't even have a cd drive never mind a dvd...

    >
     
  14. Bud

    Bud Flightless Bird

    On 2010-02-11, BillW50 wrote:
    >
    > So to stop a rootkit, no user can use root level access. Well sounds
    > good on paper, but you can't install any applications or anything
    > without root access control.


    You don't have to be on line to the Internet now does it?

    > I use an old Toshiba 2595XDVD ('99 era) running Windows 98 with a 400MHz
    > Celeron with only 64GB of RAM to watch DVD movies on. Can Xine do this
    > on the same machine?


    Of course, with Linux on 200 MHZ AMD 90s era.
    --
    Bud
     
  15. Bud

    Bud Flightless Bird

    On 2010-02-12, BillW50 wrote:
    >
    > Nope, I don't think so. As a 400MHz Celeron is the lowest that you can
    > go to get decent DVD playback from all I know under Windows. My
    > experience with Linux, you need three or more times the processor power
    > for the same.


    Boy, you don't know shit.
    --
    Bud
     
  16. TJ

    TJ Flightless Bird

    >
    > I use an old Toshiba 2595XDVD ('99 era) running Windows 98 with a 400MHz
    > Celeron with only 64GB of RAM to watch DVD movies on. Can Xine do this
    > on the same machine?
    >


    wow u have problems with a 64GB of RAM computer playing dvds? =D
     

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