1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Another seemingly noobie question.

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by bettablue, Jul 25, 2010.

  1. bettablue

    bettablue Flightless Bird

    I built this computer about 18 months ago and all is great running Windows 7
    64. The question I have right now is whether or not I really need to add
    memory. I am running a gigabyte mobo with a 3 gig dual core Intel processor
    along with 4 gigs of RAM. My wife found another 4 Gigs somewhere and picked
    it up, thinking that she would use it on her computer, but it won't work for
    her system, wrong type. But, it will go into mine so she gave it to me and
    bought the correct memory for hers. (Yes, I love my wife) Will I gain
    anything by installing the additional 4 gigs? I do a lot of video work and
    imaging along with some heavy gaming, but I am not using anything like
    Virtual XP mode, although I might try it for some older programs I have.

    What do you think?
    --


    **Support our 2nd Amendment Rights! Because when seconds count, the police
    are only minutes away**
     
  2. Mr Baracuda

    Mr Baracuda Flightless Bird

    I think this is a noobie question...

    and frank STILL cant answer it!

    lol

    of course you should install more ram but how many RAM slots do you have?

    How many Gb is each ram stick?

    If you have 4 slots, and the sticks are 2 gb each then you are ok...
    But before you put those sticks inside

    Can you beat the heck out of frank with a stick on his empty head?

    Just in case you don’t know, frank is this newsgroups (and many others too)
    CLOWN.



    "bettablue" wrote in message
    news:i2h3qi$je1$1@news.eternal-september.org...

    I built this computer about 18 months ago and all is great running Windows 7
    64. The question I have right now is whether or not I really need to add
    memory. I am running a gigabyte mobo with a 3 gig dual core Intel processor
    along with 4 gigs of RAM. My wife found another 4 Gigs somewhere and picked
    it up, thinking that she would use it on her computer, but it won't work for
    her system, wrong type. But, it will go into mine so she gave it to me and
    bought the correct memory for hers. (Yes, I love my wife) Will I gain
    anything by installing the additional 4 gigs? I do a lot of video work and
    imaging along with some heavy gaming, but I am not using anything like
    Virtual XP mode, although I might try it for some older programs I have.

    What do you think?
    --


    **Support our 2nd Amendment Rights! Because when seconds count, the police
    are only minutes away**
     
  3. Muad'Dib

    Muad'Dib Flightless Bird

    On 07/25/2010 04:31 AM, bettablue wrote:
    > I built this computer about 18 months ago and all is great running Windows 7
    > 64. The question I have right now is whether or not I really need to add
    > memory. I am running a gigabyte mobo with a 3 gig dual core Intel processor
    > along with 4 gigs of RAM. My wife found another 4 Gigs somewhere and picked
    > it up, thinking that she would use it on her computer, but it won't work for
    > her system, wrong type. But, it will go into mine so she gave it to me and
    > bought the correct memory for hers. (Yes, I love my wife) Will I gain
    > anything by installing the additional 4 gigs? I do a lot of video work and
    > imaging along with some heavy gaming, but I am not using anything like
    > Virtual XP mode, although I might try it for some older programs I have.
    >
    > What do you think?


    I don't get the odd memory size in the first place, (3gig), but
    whatever. Memory, memory, memory, it's a GOOD thing. You have 4 more
    gigs to install if your MB will accept it all, so do it. More mem = less
    page files, (Swap), thus better performance, period. A powerful video
    card, (chip set), makes a big difference as well for gaming and video
    intensive applications, but still, a good amount of regular memory CAN'T
    hurt that is for sure. Pop it in and see how things run. I don't think
    you will want to remove it once you see how much better things run! (Not
    to mention how much more multitasking you will be able to do) I have
    6gigs on my newest machine, and it rocks for all that I do. ..Still, I'm
    thinking about upping it to 8gb! (Win7)

    G'day
     
  4. Roy Smith

    Roy Smith Flightless Bird

    Muad'Dib said the following on 7/25/2010 6:15 AM:
    > On 07/25/2010 04:31 AM, bettablue wrote:
    >> I built this computer about 18 months ago and all is great running
    >> Windows 7
    >> 64. The question I have right now is whether or not I really need to add
    >> memory. I am running a gigabyte mobo with a 3 gig dual core Intel
    >> processor
    >> along with 4 gigs of RAM.
    >>

    >
    > I don't get the odd memory size in the first place, (3gig), but
    > whatever. Memory, memory, memory, it's a GOOD thing. You have 4 more


    The 3Gig he's referring to is the processor clock speed... (3 Ghz).
    Later on he does say that he has 4 Gigs of memory.


    --

    Roy Smith
    Windows 7 Professional
    Postbox 1.1.5
    Sunday, July 25, 2010 6:46:35 AM
     
  5. Muad'Dib

    Muad'Dib Flightless Bird

    On 07/25/2010 05:46 AM, Roy Smith wrote:
    > Muad'Dib said the following on 7/25/2010 6:15 AM:
    >> On 07/25/2010 04:31 AM, bettablue wrote:
    >>> I built this computer about 18 months ago and all is great running
    >>> Windows 7
    >>> 64. The question I have right now is whether or not I really need to add
    >>> memory. I am running a gigabyte mobo with a 3 gig dual core Intel
    >>> processor
    >>> along with 4 gigs of RAM.
    >>>

    >>
    >> I don't get the odd memory size in the first place, (3gig), but
    >> whatever. Memory, memory, memory, it's a GOOD thing. You have 4 more

    >
    > The 3Gig he's referring to is the processor clock speed... (3 Ghz).
    > Later on he does say that he has 4 Gigs of memory.
    >
    >

    Oh oops, missed that. LONG day, and now morning.. Thanks

    G'day
     
  6. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 03:31:44 -0700, "bettablue"
    <bettablue@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > I built this computer about 18 months ago and all is great running Windows 7
    > 64. The question I have right now is whether or not I really need to add
    > memory. I am running a gigabyte mobo with a 3 gig dual core Intel processor
    > along with 4 gigs of RAM. My wife found another 4 Gigs somewhere and picked
    > it up, thinking that she would use it on her computer, but it won't work for
    > her system, wrong type. But, it will go into mine so she gave it to me and
    > bought the correct memory for hers. (Yes, I love my wife) Will I gain
    > anything by installing the additional 4 gigs? I do a lot of video work and
    > imaging along with some heavy gaming, but I am not using anything like
    > Virtual XP mode, although I might try it for some older programs I have.



    Two points:

    1. How much memory you can effectively use depends on what apps you
    run. You say "a lot of video work and imaging along with some heavy
    gaming" and those strongly suggest that more than 4GB *will* help your
    performance.

    2. It's unfortunately highly unlikely that you can add the 4GB she
    found unless it matches the RAM you already have in all respects
    (brand, speed, etc.).
     
  7. Stefan Patric

    Stefan Patric Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 03:31:44 -0700, bettablue wrote:

    > I built this computer about 18 months ago and all is great running
    > Windows 7 64. The question I have right now is whether or not I really
    > need to add memory. I am running a gigabyte mobo with a 3 gig dual core
    > Intel processor along with 4 gigs of RAM. My wife found another 4 Gigs
    > somewhere and picked it up, thinking that she would use it on her
    > computer, but it won't work for her system, wrong type. But, it will go
    > into mine so she gave it to me and bought the correct memory for hers.
    > (Yes, I love my wife) Will I gain anything by installing the additional
    > 4 gigs? I do a lot of video work and imaging along with some heavy
    > gaming, but I am not using anything like Virtual XP mode, although I
    > might try it for some older programs I have.
    >
    > What do you think?


    Generally, the more RAM, the better. (I consider 4GB the absolute
    minimum for a useful Windows 7 system anyway.) And since you do video
    editing--a heavy RAM user, more RAM would be beneficial. However, check
    your motherboard's max RAM capacity. Many, even 64-bit ones, max out at
    4GB.

    With my current system--now about 3.5 years old--I had to really hunt to
    find a motherboard (64-bit) that would take 8GB max RAM as well as
    satisfy my other requirements.

    Stef
     
  8. Gordon

    Gordon Flightless Bird

    On 25/07/2010 16:38, Stefan Patric wrote:

    >
    > Generally, the more RAM, the better. (I consider 4GB the absolute
    > minimum for a useful Windows 7 system anyway.)


    Tosh. Mime performs perfectly well on only 2GB...
     
  9. Frank

    Frank Flightless Bird

    capin' crunch is still stupid!...LOL!

    On 7/25/2010 4:04 AM, Mr Baracuda wrote:
    > I think this is a noobie question...


    ---------------------------------------------

    But you, capin' crunch, still can't correctly answer it!
    You're still stupid crunch...LOL!
    Oops!
     
  10. Death

    Death Flightless Bird

    "Gordon" <gordonbparker@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:i2hn3s$me$2@news.eternal-september.org...
    > On 25/07/2010 16:38, Stefan Patric wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Generally, the more RAM, the better. (I consider 4GB the absolute
    >> minimum for a useful Windows 7 system anyway.)

    >
    > Tosh. Mime performs perfectly well on only 2GB...


    6GB runs Minesweeper pretty well.

    --
    Vita brevis breviter in brevi finietur,
    Mors venit velociter quae neminem veretur.
     
  11. bettablue

    bettablue Flightless Bird

    "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.invalid.com> wrote in message
    news:eek:pho46lj2ejupckagh0as8plbglss4bvi6@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 03:31:44 -0700, "bettablue"
    > <bettablue@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >> I built this computer about 18 months ago and all is great running
    >> Windows 7
    >> 64. The question I have right now is whether or not I really need to add
    >> memory. I am running a gigabyte mobo with a 3 gig dual core Intel
    >> processor
    >> along with 4 gigs of RAM. My wife found another 4 Gigs somewhere and
    >> picked
    >> it up, thinking that she would use it on her computer, but it won't work
    >> for
    >> her system, wrong type. But, it will go into mine so she gave it to me
    >> and
    >> bought the correct memory for hers. (Yes, I love my wife) Will I gain
    >> anything by installing the additional 4 gigs? I do a lot of video work
    >> and
    >> imaging along with some heavy gaming, but I am not using anything like
    >> Virtual XP mode, although I might try it for some older programs I have.

    >
    >
    > Two points:
    >
    > 1. How much memory you can effectively use depends on what apps you
    > run. You say "a lot of video work and imaging along with some heavy
    > gaming" and those strongly suggest that more than 4GB *will* help your
    > performance.
    >
    > 2. It's unfortunately highly unlikely that you can add the 4GB she
    > found unless it matches the RAM you already have in all respects
    > (brand, speed, etc.).
    >


    Ken as always, good info. The RAM she bought is the same as far as that it
    is the same type. The brand is different, but the brochure that came with
    my board suggests that it won't be a problem. The speed is the same, the
    type is the same. The sticks look very different though. I'm going to
    install it and see how it goes.
     
  12. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 10:19:03 -0700, "bettablue"
    <bettablue@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.invalid.com> wrote in message
    > news:eek:pho46lj2ejupckagh0as8plbglss4bvi6@4ax.com...
    > > On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 03:31:44 -0700, "bettablue"
    > > <bettablue@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I built this computer about 18 months ago and all is great running
    > >> Windows 7
    > >> 64. The question I have right now is whether or not I really need to add
    > >> memory. I am running a gigabyte mobo with a 3 gig dual core Intel
    > >> processor
    > >> along with 4 gigs of RAM. My wife found another 4 Gigs somewhere and
    > >> picked
    > >> it up, thinking that she would use it on her computer, but it won't work
    > >> for
    > >> her system, wrong type. But, it will go into mine so she gave it to me
    > >> and
    > >> bought the correct memory for hers. (Yes, I love my wife) Will I gain
    > >> anything by installing the additional 4 gigs? I do a lot of video work
    > >> and
    > >> imaging along with some heavy gaming, but I am not using anything like
    > >> Virtual XP mode, although I might try it for some older programs I have.

    > >
    > >
    > > Two points:
    > >
    > > 1. How much memory you can effectively use depends on what apps you
    > > run. You say "a lot of video work and imaging along with some heavy
    > > gaming" and those strongly suggest that more than 4GB *will* help your
    > > performance.
    > >
    > > 2. It's unfortunately highly unlikely that you can add the 4GB she
    > > found unless it matches the RAM you already have in all respects
    > > (brand, speed, etc.).
    > >

    >
    > Ken as always, good info.



    Thanks for the kind words.


    > The RAM she bought is the same as far as that it
    > is the same type. The brand is different, but the brochure that came with
    > my board suggests that it won't be a problem. The speed is the same, the
    > type is the same. The sticks look very different though. I'm going to
    > install it and see how it goes.




    Sure. You have nothing to lose by trying. If it fails (and my guess is
    that it will) you can always take it out.
     
  13. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 15:38:26 +0000 (UTC), Stefan Patric
    <not@this.address.com> wrote:


    > Generally, the more RAM, the better.



    Not correct. If your apps don't need much RAM, more won't help you at
    all. To take an extreme example, if all you do is play solitaire, you
    wouldn't be able to tell the difference between 1GB and 16GB.


    > (I consider 4GB the absolute
    > minimum for a useful Windows 7 system anyway.)



    Also not correct. Here are two examples:

    1. My wife has 2GB. She doesn't run much in the way of RAM-hungry
    apps, and her performance for what she does is just fine. She has
    turned down my offer to add RAM to her machine.

    2. My netbook has 1GB of RAM. Performance is far from great, and
    undoubtedly more would help. But considering that I do almost nothing
    with it but e-mail, while traveling, it's just fine.


    > And since you do video
    > editing--a heavy RAM user, more RAM would be beneficial.




    You are very likely correct there.
     
  14. Char Jackson

    Char Jackson Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 07:19:35 -0700, Ken Blake
    <kblake@this.is.invalid.com> wrote:

    >On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 03:31:44 -0700, "bettablue"
    ><bettablue@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >> I built this computer about 18 months ago and all is great running Windows 7
    >> 64. The question I have right now is whether or not I really need to add
    >> memory. I am running a gigabyte mobo with a 3 gig dual core Intel processor
    >> along with 4 gigs of RAM. My wife found another 4 Gigs somewhere and picked
    >> it up, thinking that she would use it on her computer, but it won't work for
    >> her system, wrong type. But, it will go into mine so she gave it to me and
    >> bought the correct memory for hers. (Yes, I love my wife) Will I gain
    >> anything by installing the additional 4 gigs? I do a lot of video work and
    >> imaging along with some heavy gaming, but I am not using anything like
    >> Virtual XP mode, although I might try it for some older programs I have.

    >
    >
    >Two points:
    >
    >1. How much memory you can effectively use depends on what apps you
    >run. You say "a lot of video work and imaging along with some heavy
    >gaming" and those strongly suggest that more than 4GB *will* help your
    >performance.
    >
    >2. It's unfortunately highly unlikely that you can add the 4GB she
    >found unless it matches the RAM you already have in all respects
    >(brand, speed, etc.).


    Technically, it only needs to be the same type (correct number of
    pins, primarily). Brand, speed, and module size are not important.
    Having said, I normally recommend installing memory in pairs for
    optimum performance, but even that isn't important.

    I've never run into a motherboard that has a problem with mixed
    brands, speeds, or module sizes.
     
  15. Death

    Death Flightless Bird

    "Char Jackson" <none@none.invalid> wrote in message
    news:df2q46tp9jbkae192hatbse047supc3ik1@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 07:19:35 -0700, Ken Blake
    > <kblake@this.is.invalid.com> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 03:31:44 -0700, "bettablue"
    >><bettablue@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I built this computer about 18 months ago and all is great running
    >>> Windows 7
    >>> 64. The question I have right now is whether or not I really need to
    >>> add
    >>> memory. I am running a gigabyte mobo with a 3 gig dual core Intel
    >>> processor
    >>> along with 4 gigs of RAM. My wife found another 4 Gigs somewhere and
    >>> picked
    >>> it up, thinking that she would use it on her computer, but it won't work
    >>> for
    >>> her system, wrong type. But, it will go into mine so she gave it to me
    >>> and
    >>> bought the correct memory for hers. (Yes, I love my wife) Will I gain
    >>> anything by installing the additional 4 gigs? I do a lot of video work
    >>> and
    >>> imaging along with some heavy gaming, but I am not using anything like
    >>> Virtual XP mode, although I might try it for some older programs I have.

    >>
    >>
    >>Two points:
    >>
    >>1. How much memory you can effectively use depends on what apps you
    >>run. You say "a lot of video work and imaging along with some heavy
    >>gaming" and those strongly suggest that more than 4GB *will* help your
    >>performance.
    >>
    >>2. It's unfortunately highly unlikely that you can add the 4GB she
    >>found unless it matches the RAM you already have in all respects
    >>(brand, speed, etc.).

    >
    > Technically, it only needs to be the same type (correct number of
    > pins, primarily). Brand, speed, and module size are not important.
    > Having said, I normally recommend installing memory in pairs for
    > optimum performance, but even that isn't important.
    >
    > I've never run into a motherboard that has a problem with mixed
    > brands, speeds, or module sizes.
    >


    Hahahaha.
    Try a Dell.
    N00b.

    --
    Vita brevis breviter in brevi finietur,
    Mors venit velociter quae neminem veretur.
     
  16. Stefan Patric

    Stefan Patric Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 17:01:00 +0100, Gordon wrote:

    > On 25/07/2010 16:38, Stefan Patric wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Generally, the more RAM, the better. (I consider 4GB the absolute
    >> minimum for a useful Windows 7 system anyway.)

    >
    > Tosh. Mime performs perfectly well on only 2GB...


    The rule of thumb (for general use) I've used for years with Windows, and
    it has served me pretty well, is to take the RAM minimum recommended by
    Microsoft and double it. The minimum is for installing and running the
    OS, and it is always stated so, i.e. "...to run Windows 7 on your PC."
    MS doesn't say anything about the additional RAM needed for the apps,
    etc. So, you need more than the minimum for the system to run well.

    And it, of course, depends on what you're doing. Memory intensive apps
    like the OP's video editing needs more than the minimums. Lots more.

    Stef
     
  17. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 23:10:34 -0500, Char Jackson <none@none.invalid>
    wrote:


    > >2. It's unfortunately highly unlikely that you can add the 4GB she
    > >found unless it matches the RAM you already have in all respects
    > >(brand, speed, etc.).

    >
    > Technically, it only needs to be the same type (correct number of
    > pins, primarily). Brand, speed, and module size are not important.
    > Having said, I normally recommend installing memory in pairs for
    > optimum performance, but even that isn't important.
    >
    > I've never run into a motherboard that has a problem with mixed
    > brands, speeds, or module sizes.



    OK--you haven't, but many other people have.
     
  18. Ken Blake

    Ken Blake Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 26 Jul 2010 16:54:50 +0000 (UTC), Stefan Patric
    <not@this.address.com> wrote:

    > On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 17:01:00 +0100, Gordon wrote:
    >
    > > On 25/07/2010 16:38, Stefan Patric wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >> Generally, the more RAM, the better. (I consider 4GB the absolute
    > >> minimum for a useful Windows 7 system anyway.)

    > >
    > > Tosh. Mime performs perfectly well on only 2GB...

    >
    > The rule of thumb (for general use) I've used for years with Windows, and
    > it has served me pretty well, is to take the RAM minimum recommended by
    > Microsoft and double it.




    To take a single example, Microsoft's minimum for Windows XP was 64MB.
    Have you ever tried running it with 128MB? Unless you do little more
    than play solitaire, 128MB isn't enough for anyone. Almost everyone
    needs at least 256MB, and depending on what apps they run, many people
    need more.


    > The minimum is for installing and running the
    > OS, and it is always stated so, i.e. "...to run Windows 7 on your PC."



    Yes.


    > MS doesn't say anything about the additional RAM needed for the apps,
    > etc. So, you need more than the minimum for the system to run well.



    Almost always true.


    > And it, of course, depends on what you're doing. Memory intensive apps
    > like the OP's video editing needs more than the minimums.



    Exactly right!
     
  19. Stefan Patric

    Stefan Patric Flightless Bird

    On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 11:08:21 -0700, Ken Blake wrote:

    > On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 15:38:26 +0000 (UTC), Stefan Patric
    > <not@this.address.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Generally, the more RAM, the better.

    >
    >
    > Not correct. If your apps don't need much RAM, more won't help you at
    > all. To take an extreme example, if all you do is play solitaire, you
    > wouldn't be able to tell the difference between 1GB and 16GB.


    I stand by my very generalized statement. However, as with all
    generalizations, specifically you can always find situations where they
    don't apply.

    > [snip]
     
  20. Stefan Patric

    Stefan Patric Flightless Bird

    On Mon, 26 Jul 2010 10:32:21 -0700, Ken Blake wrote:

    > On Mon, 26 Jul 2010 16:54:50 +0000 (UTC), Stefan Patric
    > <not@this.address.com> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 17:01:00 +0100, Gordon wrote:
    >>
    >> > On 25/07/2010 16:38, Stefan Patric wrote:
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >> Generally, the more RAM, the better. (I consider 4GB the absolute
    >> >> minimum for a useful Windows 7 system anyway.)
    >> >
    >> > Tosh. Mime performs perfectly well on only 2GB...

    >>
    >> The rule of thumb (for general use) I've used for years with Windows,
    >> and it has served me pretty well, is to take the RAM minimum
    >> recommended by Microsoft and double it.

    >
    >
    >
    > To take a single example, Microsoft's minimum for Windows XP was 64MB.
    > Have you ever tried running it with 128MB? Unless you do little more
    > than play solitaire, 128MB isn't enough for anyone. Almost everyone
    > needs at least 256MB, and depending on what apps they run, many people
    > need more.
    >
    > [snip]


    MS "recommends" 128MB for XP Home even though they say "at least" 64MB.
    I would double the 128, since they recommend that amount over 64.

    Yes, I have installed and run XP Home on a 128MB system, but to get
    decent performance, I had to "turn off" a lot of nonessential features
    and background processes. Also, made sure that no apps were "preloaded"
    on boot up. For e-mail, web, word processing, printing, etc. it worked
    fine, which was all it was going to be used for. Although, as you said,
    256MB of RAM would have been better.


    Stef
     

Share This Page