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ahci enabled, can I revert back

Discussion in 'Windows 7' started by Bob H, Oct 6, 2010.

  1. Bob H

    Bob H Flightless Bird

    I have recently enabled AHCI on my Win7 64 bit system which has 2 SATA
    HD's and dual boots with WinXP 43 bit.
    I haven't used WinXP for a while but that's not to say I won't.
    From what I have read, whilst enabling AHCI for Win7, may well render
    WinXP un bootable.
    I don't have any problems with my Win7 system, but have found that there
    doesn't seem to be any noticeable advantage of having AHCI turned on.
    I use a driver update program which has backed up all my drivers prior
    to installing updates earlier this week.
    What I would like to know is can I restore the old drivers, then turn
    off AHCI in the BIOS, so that WinXP will boot ok.

    The reason I have posted on here is because I cannot find any relevant
    information otherwise

    Thanks
     
  2. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Bob H wrote:
    > I have recently enabled AHCI on my Win7 64 bit system which has 2 SATA
    > HD's and dual boots with WinXP 43 bit.
    > I haven't used WinXP for a while but that's not to say I won't.
    > From what I have read, whilst enabling AHCI for Win7, may well render
    > WinXP un bootable.
    > I don't have any problems with my Win7 system, but have found that there
    > doesn't seem to be any noticeable advantage of having AHCI turned on.
    > I use a driver update program which has backed up all my drivers prior
    > to installing updates earlier this week.
    > What I would like to know is can I restore the old drivers, then turn
    > off AHCI in the BIOS, so that WinXP will boot ok.
    >
    > The reason I have posted on here is because I cannot find any relevant
    > information otherwise
    >
    > Thanks


    This isn't a solution. It is a reference, to describe how (some) drivers
    work with Windows 7.

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976

    The unused drivers are supposed to be disabled, and it has something to
    do with reducing boot time.

    Re-enabling a driver, would seem to make it a candidate at boot time. And
    yet, I don't see a registry value defined in that article for a "vanilla IDE"
    option for SATA. Maybe that means that built-in driver is always enabled
    and available for discovery at boot ?

    I would shutdown, go to the BIOS, flip the BIOS back to the non-AHCI/non-RAID
    option for the disk controller, then attempt to boot Windows 7. If it works,
    then chances are, the built-in AHCI driver would be disabled from then onward.

    (It is the "vanilla" to AHCI case, that needs the registry tweak.)

    If the test fails, you have the option of entering the BIOS and setting
    it back to AHCI, so at least you can boot. And then seeing if there is any
    more help here.

    I don't think you'll get stuck. At most, you'll be entering the BIOS twice,
    to see if it works, or doesn't work.

    I think Microsoft at least owes us a state diagram, rather than us
    having to figure this out, one test case at a time :-( I thought the purpose
    of computers, was to make it easier to do something, not harder.
    And surely, there must have been some other way to solve this problem.

    And, as well, the logic of what is required, shouldn't vary from one brand
    to another. The state diagram should not have different paths for
    Intel chipsets, than for AMD chipsets. That would be lunacy, and show
    a lack of proper architecting by the OS manufacturer.

    Paul
     
  3. Bob H

    Bob H Flightless Bird

    On 06/10/2010 18:30, Paul wrote:
    > Bob H wrote:
    >> I have recently enabled AHCI on my Win7 64 bit system which has 2 SATA
    >> HD's and dual boots with WinXP 43 bit.
    >> I haven't used WinXP for a while but that's not to say I won't.
    >> From what I have read, whilst enabling AHCI for Win7, may well render
    >> WinXP un bootable.
    >> I don't have any problems with my Win7 system, but have found that
    >> there doesn't seem to be any noticeable advantage of having AHCI
    >> turned on.
    >> I use a driver update program which has backed up all my drivers prior
    >> to installing updates earlier this week.
    >> What I would like to know is can I restore the old drivers, then turn
    >> off AHCI in the BIOS, so that WinXP will boot ok.
    >>
    >> The reason I have posted on here is because I cannot find any relevant
    >> information otherwise
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    > This isn't a solution. It is a reference, to describe how (some) drivers
    > work with Windows 7.
    >
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976
    >
    > The unused drivers are supposed to be disabled, and it has something to
    > do with reducing boot time.
    >
    > Re-enabling a driver, would seem to make it a candidate at boot time. And
    > yet, I don't see a registry value defined in that article for a "vanilla
    > IDE"
    > option for SATA. Maybe that means that built-in driver is always enabled
    > and available for discovery at boot ?
    >
    > I would shutdown, go to the BIOS, flip the BIOS back to the
    > non-AHCI/non-RAID
    > option for the disk controller, then attempt to boot Windows 7. If it
    > works,
    > then chances are, the built-in AHCI driver would be disabled from then
    > onward.
    >
    > (It is the "vanilla" to AHCI case, that needs the registry tweak.)
    >
    > If the test fails, you have the option of entering the BIOS and setting
    > it back to AHCI, so at least you can boot. And then seeing if there is any
    > more help here.
    >
    > I don't think you'll get stuck. At most, you'll be entering the BIOS twice,
    > to see if it works, or doesn't work.
    >
    > I think Microsoft at least owes us a state diagram, rather than us
    > having to figure this out, one test case at a time :-( I thought the
    > purpose
    > of computers, was to make it easier to do something, not harder.
    > And surely, there must have been some other way to solve this problem.
    >
    > And, as well, the logic of what is required, shouldn't vary from one brand
    > to another. The state diagram should not have different paths for
    > Intel chipsets, than for AMD chipsets. That would be lunacy, and show
    > a lack of proper architecting by the OS manufacturer.
    >
    > Paul


    So in the link you gave me it tells you how to enable AHCI in windows by
    means of changing values in the registry.
    What I did was to change the values first, then rebooted into the BIOS
    and changed the option there then booted back into win7

    Now what I'd like to know is to do what you say, how should I proceed
    regarding the said win7 registry values. I think I should change the
    registry values first???

    Thanks
     
  4. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Bob H wrote:
    > On 06/10/2010 18:30, Paul wrote:
    >> Bob H wrote:
    >>> I have recently enabled AHCI on my Win7 64 bit system which has 2 SATA
    >>> HD's and dual boots with WinXP 43 bit.
    >>> I haven't used WinXP for a while but that's not to say I won't.
    >>> From what I have read, whilst enabling AHCI for Win7, may well render
    >>> WinXP un bootable.
    >>> I don't have any problems with my Win7 system, but have found that
    >>> there doesn't seem to be any noticeable advantage of having AHCI
    >>> turned on.
    >>> I use a driver update program which has backed up all my drivers prior
    >>> to installing updates earlier this week.
    >>> What I would like to know is can I restore the old drivers, then turn
    >>> off AHCI in the BIOS, so that WinXP will boot ok.
    >>>
    >>> The reason I have posted on here is because I cannot find any relevant
    >>> information otherwise
    >>>
    >>> Thanks

    >>
    >> This isn't a solution. It is a reference, to describe how (some) drivers
    >> work with Windows 7.
    >>
    >> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976
    >>
    >> The unused drivers are supposed to be disabled, and it has something to
    >> do with reducing boot time.
    >>
    >> Re-enabling a driver, would seem to make it a candidate at boot time. And
    >> yet, I don't see a registry value defined in that article for a "vanilla
    >> IDE"
    >> option for SATA. Maybe that means that built-in driver is always enabled
    >> and available for discovery at boot ?
    >>
    >> I would shutdown, go to the BIOS, flip the BIOS back to the
    >> non-AHCI/non-RAID
    >> option for the disk controller, then attempt to boot Windows 7. If it
    >> works,
    >> then chances are, the built-in AHCI driver would be disabled from then
    >> onward.
    >>
    >> (It is the "vanilla" to AHCI case, that needs the registry tweak.)
    >>
    >> If the test fails, you have the option of entering the BIOS and setting
    >> it back to AHCI, so at least you can boot. And then seeing if there is
    >> any
    >> more help here.
    >>
    >> I don't think you'll get stuck. At most, you'll be entering the BIOS
    >> twice,
    >> to see if it works, or doesn't work.
    >>
    >> I think Microsoft at least owes us a state diagram, rather than us
    >> having to figure this out, one test case at a time :-( I thought the
    >> purpose
    >> of computers, was to make it easier to do something, not harder.
    >> And surely, there must have been some other way to solve this problem.
    >>
    >> And, as well, the logic of what is required, shouldn't vary from one
    >> brand
    >> to another. The state diagram should not have different paths for
    >> Intel chipsets, than for AMD chipsets. That would be lunacy, and show
    >> a lack of proper architecting by the OS manufacturer.
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    > So in the link you gave me it tells you how to enable AHCI in windows by
    > means of changing values in the registry.
    > What I did was to change the values first, then rebooted into the BIOS
    > and changed the option there then booted back into win7
    >
    > Now what I'd like to know is to do what you say, how should I proceed
    > regarding the said win7 registry values. I think I should change the
    > registry values first???
    >
    > Thanks


    If there was a registry entry for "vanilla" interface mode, then I'd say
    change it. If there isn't a registry entry, it implies the OS checks
    each time, for that driver case. That's why I recommended just trying
    the BIOS test first, to see if it would work, without doing something
    to the registry. If it doesn't work, by just changing the BIOS
    from AHCI --> vanilla, then you'd go back to "registry hunting".

    Paul
     
  5. Bob H

    Bob H Flightless Bird

    On 06/10/2010 18:45, Paul wrote:
    > Bob H wrote:
    >> On 06/10/2010 18:30, Paul wrote:
    >>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>> I have recently enabled AHCI on my Win7 64 bit system which has 2 SATA
    >>>> HD's and dual boots with WinXP 43 bit.
    >>>> I haven't used WinXP for a while but that's not to say I won't.
    >>>> From what I have read, whilst enabling AHCI for Win7, may well render
    >>>> WinXP un bootable.
    >>>> I don't have any problems with my Win7 system, but have found that
    >>>> there doesn't seem to be any noticeable advantage of having AHCI
    >>>> turned on.
    >>>> I use a driver update program which has backed up all my drivers prior
    >>>> to installing updates earlier this week.
    >>>> What I would like to know is can I restore the old drivers, then turn
    >>>> off AHCI in the BIOS, so that WinXP will boot ok.
    >>>>
    >>>> The reason I have posted on here is because I cannot find any relevant
    >>>> information otherwise
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks
    >>>
    >>> This isn't a solution. It is a reference, to describe how (some) drivers
    >>> work with Windows 7.
    >>>
    >>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976
    >>>
    >>> The unused drivers are supposed to be disabled, and it has something to
    >>> do with reducing boot time.
    >>>
    >>> Re-enabling a driver, would seem to make it a candidate at boot time.
    >>> And
    >>> yet, I don't see a registry value defined in that article for a "vanilla
    >>> IDE"
    >>> option for SATA. Maybe that means that built-in driver is always enabled
    >>> and available for discovery at boot ?
    >>>
    >>> I would shutdown, go to the BIOS, flip the BIOS back to the
    >>> non-AHCI/non-RAID
    >>> option for the disk controller, then attempt to boot Windows 7. If it
    >>> works,
    >>> then chances are, the built-in AHCI driver would be disabled from then
    >>> onward.
    >>>
    >>> (It is the "vanilla" to AHCI case, that needs the registry tweak.)
    >>>
    >>> If the test fails, you have the option of entering the BIOS and setting
    >>> it back to AHCI, so at least you can boot. And then seeing if there
    >>> is any
    >>> more help here.
    >>>
    >>> I don't think you'll get stuck. At most, you'll be entering the BIOS
    >>> twice,
    >>> to see if it works, or doesn't work.
    >>>
    >>> I think Microsoft at least owes us a state diagram, rather than us
    >>> having to figure this out, one test case at a time :-( I thought the
    >>> purpose
    >>> of computers, was to make it easier to do something, not harder.
    >>> And surely, there must have been some other way to solve this problem.
    >>>
    >>> And, as well, the logic of what is required, shouldn't vary from one
    >>> brand
    >>> to another. The state diagram should not have different paths for
    >>> Intel chipsets, than for AMD chipsets. That would be lunacy, and show
    >>> a lack of proper architecting by the OS manufacturer.
    >>>
    >>> Paul

    >>
    >> So in the link you gave me it tells you how to enable AHCI in windows
    >> by means of changing values in the registry.
    >> What I did was to change the values first, then rebooted into the BIOS
    >> and changed the option there then booted back into win7
    >>
    >> Now what I'd like to know is to do what you say, how should I proceed
    >> regarding the said win7 registry values. I think I should change the
    >> registry values first???
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    > If there was a registry entry for "vanilla" interface mode, then I'd say
    > change it. If there isn't a registry entry, it implies the OS checks
    > each time, for that driver case. That's why I recommended just trying
    > the BIOS test first, to see if it would work, without doing something
    > to the registry. If it doesn't work, by just changing the BIOS
    > from AHCI --> vanilla, then you'd go back to "registry hunting".
    >
    > Paul




    Ok, I went into the BIOS and changed the setting back to IDE, rebooted
    back into win7 ok, then changed the value in the registry, rebooted and
    all seems ok again.

    thanks
     
  6. Frank

    Frank Flightless Bird

    On 10/6/2010 11:05 AM, Bob H wrote:
    > On 06/10/2010 18:45, Paul wrote:
    >> Bob H wrote:
    >>> On 06/10/2010 18:30, Paul wrote:
    >>>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>>> I have recently enabled AHCI on my Win7 64 bit system which has 2 SATA
    >>>>> HD's and dual boots with WinXP 43 bit.
    >>>>> I haven't used WinXP for a while but that's not to say I won't.
    >>>>> From what I have read, whilst enabling AHCI for Win7, may well render
    >>>>> WinXP un bootable.
    >>>>> I don't have any problems with my Win7 system, but have found that
    >>>>> there doesn't seem to be any noticeable advantage of having AHCI
    >>>>> turned on.
    >>>>> I use a driver update program which has backed up all my drivers prior
    >>>>> to installing updates earlier this week.
    >>>>> What I would like to know is can I restore the old drivers, then turn
    >>>>> off AHCI in the BIOS, so that WinXP will boot ok.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The reason I have posted on here is because I cannot find any relevant
    >>>>> information otherwise
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thanks
    >>>>
    >>>> This isn't a solution. It is a reference, to describe how (some)
    >>>> drivers
    >>>> work with Windows 7.
    >>>>
    >>>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976
    >>>>
    >>>> The unused drivers are supposed to be disabled, and it has something to
    >>>> do with reducing boot time.
    >>>>
    >>>> Re-enabling a driver, would seem to make it a candidate at boot time.
    >>>> And
    >>>> yet, I don't see a registry value defined in that article for a
    >>>> "vanilla
    >>>> IDE"
    >>>> option for SATA. Maybe that means that built-in driver is always
    >>>> enabled
    >>>> and available for discovery at boot ?
    >>>>
    >>>> I would shutdown, go to the BIOS, flip the BIOS back to the
    >>>> non-AHCI/non-RAID
    >>>> option for the disk controller, then attempt to boot Windows 7. If it
    >>>> works,
    >>>> then chances are, the built-in AHCI driver would be disabled from then
    >>>> onward.
    >>>>
    >>>> (It is the "vanilla" to AHCI case, that needs the registry tweak.)
    >>>>
    >>>> If the test fails, you have the option of entering the BIOS and setting
    >>>> it back to AHCI, so at least you can boot. And then seeing if there
    >>>> is any
    >>>> more help here.
    >>>>
    >>>> I don't think you'll get stuck. At most, you'll be entering the BIOS
    >>>> twice,
    >>>> to see if it works, or doesn't work.
    >>>>
    >>>> I think Microsoft at least owes us a state diagram, rather than us
    >>>> having to figure this out, one test case at a time :-( I thought the
    >>>> purpose
    >>>> of computers, was to make it easier to do something, not harder.
    >>>> And surely, there must have been some other way to solve this problem.
    >>>>
    >>>> And, as well, the logic of what is required, shouldn't vary from one
    >>>> brand
    >>>> to another. The state diagram should not have different paths for
    >>>> Intel chipsets, than for AMD chipsets. That would be lunacy, and show
    >>>> a lack of proper architecting by the OS manufacturer.
    >>>>
    >>>> Paul
    >>>
    >>> So in the link you gave me it tells you how to enable AHCI in windows
    >>> by means of changing values in the registry.
    >>> What I did was to change the values first, then rebooted into the BIOS
    >>> and changed the option there then booted back into win7
    >>>
    >>> Now what I'd like to know is to do what you say, how should I proceed
    >>> regarding the said win7 registry values. I think I should change the
    >>> registry values first???
    >>>
    >>> Thanks

    >>
    >> If there was a registry entry for "vanilla" interface mode, then I'd say
    >> change it. If there isn't a registry entry, it implies the OS checks
    >> each time, for that driver case. That's why I recommended just trying
    >> the BIOS test first, to see if it would work, without doing something
    >> to the registry. If it doesn't work, by just changing the BIOS
    >> from AHCI --> vanilla, then you'd go back to "registry hunting".
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    >
    >
    > Ok, I went into the BIOS and changed the setting back to IDE, rebooted
    > back into win7 ok, then changed the value in the registry, rebooted and
    > all seems ok again.
    >
    > thanks


    There was no need to change from AHCI to IDE in order to install and run
    XP. All you need do is to load the mobo AHCI drivers onto a floppy drive
    and when you install XP hit F6 and install the AHCI drivers.
    That way, you can run AHCI for 7 & XP.
     
  7. Bob H

    Bob H Flightless Bird

    On 06/10/2010 19:19, Frank wrote:
    > On 10/6/2010 11:05 AM, Bob H wrote:
    >> On 06/10/2010 18:45, Paul wrote:
    >>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>> On 06/10/2010 18:30, Paul wrote:
    >>>>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>>>> I have recently enabled AHCI on my Win7 64 bit system which has 2
    >>>>>> SATA
    >>>>>> HD's and dual boots with WinXP 43 bit.
    >>>>>> I haven't used WinXP for a while but that's not to say I won't.
    >>>>>> From what I have read, whilst enabling AHCI for Win7, may well render
    >>>>>> WinXP un bootable.
    >>>>>> I don't have any problems with my Win7 system, but have found that
    >>>>>> there doesn't seem to be any noticeable advantage of having AHCI
    >>>>>> turned on.
    >>>>>> I use a driver update program which has backed up all my drivers
    >>>>>> prior
    >>>>>> to installing updates earlier this week.
    >>>>>> What I would like to know is can I restore the old drivers, then turn
    >>>>>> off AHCI in the BIOS, so that WinXP will boot ok.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The reason I have posted on here is because I cannot find any
    >>>>>> relevant
    >>>>>> information otherwise
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Thanks
    >>>>>
    >>>>> This isn't a solution. It is a reference, to describe how (some)
    >>>>> drivers
    >>>>> work with Windows 7.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The unused drivers are supposed to be disabled, and it has
    >>>>> something to
    >>>>> do with reducing boot time.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Re-enabling a driver, would seem to make it a candidate at boot time.
    >>>>> And
    >>>>> yet, I don't see a registry value defined in that article for a
    >>>>> "vanilla
    >>>>> IDE"
    >>>>> option for SATA. Maybe that means that built-in driver is always
    >>>>> enabled
    >>>>> and available for discovery at boot ?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I would shutdown, go to the BIOS, flip the BIOS back to the
    >>>>> non-AHCI/non-RAID
    >>>>> option for the disk controller, then attempt to boot Windows 7. If it
    >>>>> works,
    >>>>> then chances are, the built-in AHCI driver would be disabled from then
    >>>>> onward.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> (It is the "vanilla" to AHCI case, that needs the registry tweak.)
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If the test fails, you have the option of entering the BIOS and
    >>>>> setting
    >>>>> it back to AHCI, so at least you can boot. And then seeing if there
    >>>>> is any
    >>>>> more help here.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I don't think you'll get stuck. At most, you'll be entering the BIOS
    >>>>> twice,
    >>>>> to see if it works, or doesn't work.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I think Microsoft at least owes us a state diagram, rather than us
    >>>>> having to figure this out, one test case at a time :-( I thought the
    >>>>> purpose
    >>>>> of computers, was to make it easier to do something, not harder.
    >>>>> And surely, there must have been some other way to solve this problem.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> And, as well, the logic of what is required, shouldn't vary from one
    >>>>> brand
    >>>>> to another. The state diagram should not have different paths for
    >>>>> Intel chipsets, than for AMD chipsets. That would be lunacy, and show
    >>>>> a lack of proper architecting by the OS manufacturer.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Paul
    >>>>
    >>>> So in the link you gave me it tells you how to enable AHCI in windows
    >>>> by means of changing values in the registry.
    >>>> What I did was to change the values first, then rebooted into the BIOS
    >>>> and changed the option there then booted back into win7
    >>>>
    >>>> Now what I'd like to know is to do what you say, how should I proceed
    >>>> regarding the said win7 registry values. I think I should change the
    >>>> registry values first???
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks
    >>>
    >>> If there was a registry entry for "vanilla" interface mode, then I'd say
    >>> change it. If there isn't a registry entry, it implies the OS checks
    >>> each time, for that driver case. That's why I recommended just trying
    >>> the BIOS test first, to see if it would work, without doing something
    >>> to the registry. If it doesn't work, by just changing the BIOS
    >>> from AHCI --> vanilla, then you'd go back to "registry hunting".
    >>>
    >>> Paul

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Ok, I went into the BIOS and changed the setting back to IDE, rebooted
    >> back into win7 ok, then changed the value in the registry, rebooted and
    >> all seems ok again.
    >>
    >> thanks

    >
    > There was no need to change from AHCI to IDE in order to install and run
    > XP. All you need do is to load the mobo AHCI drivers onto a floppy drive
    > and when you install XP hit F6 and install the AHCI drivers.
    > That way, you can run AHCI for 7 & XP.


    Yes I know, but WinXP is already installed and I have read that if AHCI
    is enabled in the BIOS and the boot into WinXP a BSOD occurs.
     
  8. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Bob H wrote:
    > On 06/10/2010 19:19, Frank wrote:
    >> On 10/6/2010 11:05 AM, Bob H wrote:
    >>> On 06/10/2010 18:45, Paul wrote:
    >>>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>>> On 06/10/2010 18:30, Paul wrote:
    >>>>>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>>>>> I have recently enabled AHCI on my Win7 64 bit system which has 2
    >>>>>>> SATA
    >>>>>>> HD's and dual boots with WinXP 43 bit.
    >>>>>>> I haven't used WinXP for a while but that's not to say I won't.
    >>>>>>> From what I have read, whilst enabling AHCI for Win7, may well
    >>>>>>> render
    >>>>>>> WinXP un bootable.
    >>>>>>> I don't have any problems with my Win7 system, but have found that
    >>>>>>> there doesn't seem to be any noticeable advantage of having AHCI
    >>>>>>> turned on.
    >>>>>>> I use a driver update program which has backed up all my drivers
    >>>>>>> prior
    >>>>>>> to installing updates earlier this week.
    >>>>>>> What I would like to know is can I restore the old drivers, then
    >>>>>>> turn
    >>>>>>> off AHCI in the BIOS, so that WinXP will boot ok.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> The reason I have posted on here is because I cannot find any
    >>>>>>> relevant
    >>>>>>> information otherwise
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Thanks
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> This isn't a solution. It is a reference, to describe how (some)
    >>>>>> drivers
    >>>>>> work with Windows 7.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The unused drivers are supposed to be disabled, and it has
    >>>>>> something to
    >>>>>> do with reducing boot time.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Re-enabling a driver, would seem to make it a candidate at boot time.
    >>>>>> And
    >>>>>> yet, I don't see a registry value defined in that article for a
    >>>>>> "vanilla
    >>>>>> IDE"
    >>>>>> option for SATA. Maybe that means that built-in driver is always
    >>>>>> enabled
    >>>>>> and available for discovery at boot ?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I would shutdown, go to the BIOS, flip the BIOS back to the
    >>>>>> non-AHCI/non-RAID
    >>>>>> option for the disk controller, then attempt to boot Windows 7. If it
    >>>>>> works,
    >>>>>> then chances are, the built-in AHCI driver would be disabled from
    >>>>>> then
    >>>>>> onward.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> (It is the "vanilla" to AHCI case, that needs the registry tweak.)
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> If the test fails, you have the option of entering the BIOS and
    >>>>>> setting
    >>>>>> it back to AHCI, so at least you can boot. And then seeing if there
    >>>>>> is any
    >>>>>> more help here.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I don't think you'll get stuck. At most, you'll be entering the BIOS
    >>>>>> twice,
    >>>>>> to see if it works, or doesn't work.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I think Microsoft at least owes us a state diagram, rather than us
    >>>>>> having to figure this out, one test case at a time :-( I thought the
    >>>>>> purpose
    >>>>>> of computers, was to make it easier to do something, not harder.
    >>>>>> And surely, there must have been some other way to solve this
    >>>>>> problem.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> And, as well, the logic of what is required, shouldn't vary from one
    >>>>>> brand
    >>>>>> to another. The state diagram should not have different paths for
    >>>>>> Intel chipsets, than for AMD chipsets. That would be lunacy, and show
    >>>>>> a lack of proper architecting by the OS manufacturer.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Paul
    >>>>>
    >>>>> So in the link you gave me it tells you how to enable AHCI in windows
    >>>>> by means of changing values in the registry.
    >>>>> What I did was to change the values first, then rebooted into the BIOS
    >>>>> and changed the option there then booted back into win7
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Now what I'd like to know is to do what you say, how should I proceed
    >>>>> regarding the said win7 registry values. I think I should change the
    >>>>> registry values first???
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thanks
    >>>>
    >>>> If there was a registry entry for "vanilla" interface mode, then I'd
    >>>> say
    >>>> change it. If there isn't a registry entry, it implies the OS checks
    >>>> each time, for that driver case. That's why I recommended just trying
    >>>> the BIOS test first, to see if it would work, without doing something
    >>>> to the registry. If it doesn't work, by just changing the BIOS
    >>>> from AHCI --> vanilla, then you'd go back to "registry hunting".
    >>>>
    >>>> Paul
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Ok, I went into the BIOS and changed the setting back to IDE, rebooted
    >>> back into win7 ok, then changed the value in the registry, rebooted and
    >>> all seems ok again.
    >>>
    >>> thanks

    >>
    >> There was no need to change from AHCI to IDE in order to install and run
    >> XP. All you need do is to load the mobo AHCI drivers onto a floppy drive
    >> and when you install XP hit F6 and install the AHCI drivers.
    >> That way, you can run AHCI for 7 & XP.

    >
    > Yes I know, but WinXP is already installed and I have read that if AHCI
    > is enabled in the BIOS and the boot into WinXP a BSOD occurs.


    There is a recipe for adding AHCI, that solves the "chicken versus egg"
    problem with an Intel AHCI driver installation. This would be for adding
    AHCI support to WinXP, after the fact. (I can't reach the site right now.)

    http://forum.msi.com.tw/index.php?action=printpage;topic=106575.0

    Normally, without that hack, being in IDE mode in WinXP, and installing
    an AHCI driver for an Intel Southbridge, would result in failure to install.
    And flipping the BIOS setting to AHCI, would cause a failure to boot.

    But dumping a bunch of crap into the registry, following that recipe,
    allows a person to hack it so it works.

    And that hack, only handles a small fraction of all possible situations.

    Paul
     
  9. Bob H

    Bob H Flightless Bird

    On 06/10/2010 20:36, Paul wrote:
    > Bob H wrote:
    >> On 06/10/2010 19:19, Frank wrote:
    >>> On 10/6/2010 11:05 AM, Bob H wrote:
    >>>> On 06/10/2010 18:45, Paul wrote:
    >>>>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>>>> On 06/10/2010 18:30, Paul wrote:
    >>>>>>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>>>>>> I have recently enabled AHCI on my Win7 64 bit system which has 2
    >>>>>>>> SATA
    >>>>>>>> HD's and dual boots with WinXP 43 bit.
    >>>>>>>> I haven't used WinXP for a while but that's not to say I won't.
    >>>>>>>> From what I have read, whilst enabling AHCI for Win7, may well
    >>>>>>>> render
    >>>>>>>> WinXP un bootable.
    >>>>>>>> I don't have any problems with my Win7 system, but have found that
    >>>>>>>> there doesn't seem to be any noticeable advantage of having AHCI
    >>>>>>>> turned on.
    >>>>>>>> I use a driver update program which has backed up all my drivers
    >>>>>>>> prior
    >>>>>>>> to installing updates earlier this week.
    >>>>>>>> What I would like to know is can I restore the old drivers, then
    >>>>>>>> turn
    >>>>>>>> off AHCI in the BIOS, so that WinXP will boot ok.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> The reason I have posted on here is because I cannot find any
    >>>>>>>> relevant
    >>>>>>>> information otherwise
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Thanks
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> This isn't a solution. It is a reference, to describe how (some)
    >>>>>>> drivers
    >>>>>>> work with Windows 7.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> The unused drivers are supposed to be disabled, and it has
    >>>>>>> something to
    >>>>>>> do with reducing boot time.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Re-enabling a driver, would seem to make it a candidate at boot
    >>>>>>> time.
    >>>>>>> And
    >>>>>>> yet, I don't see a registry value defined in that article for a
    >>>>>>> "vanilla
    >>>>>>> IDE"
    >>>>>>> option for SATA. Maybe that means that built-in driver is always
    >>>>>>> enabled
    >>>>>>> and available for discovery at boot ?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I would shutdown, go to the BIOS, flip the BIOS back to the
    >>>>>>> non-AHCI/non-RAID
    >>>>>>> option for the disk controller, then attempt to boot Windows 7.
    >>>>>>> If it
    >>>>>>> works,
    >>>>>>> then chances are, the built-in AHCI driver would be disabled from
    >>>>>>> then
    >>>>>>> onward.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> (It is the "vanilla" to AHCI case, that needs the registry tweak.)
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> If the test fails, you have the option of entering the BIOS and
    >>>>>>> setting
    >>>>>>> it back to AHCI, so at least you can boot. And then seeing if there
    >>>>>>> is any
    >>>>>>> more help here.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I don't think you'll get stuck. At most, you'll be entering the BIOS
    >>>>>>> twice,
    >>>>>>> to see if it works, or doesn't work.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I think Microsoft at least owes us a state diagram, rather than us
    >>>>>>> having to figure this out, one test case at a time :-( I thought the
    >>>>>>> purpose
    >>>>>>> of computers, was to make it easier to do something, not harder.
    >>>>>>> And surely, there must have been some other way to solve this
    >>>>>>> problem.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> And, as well, the logic of what is required, shouldn't vary from one
    >>>>>>> brand
    >>>>>>> to another. The state diagram should not have different paths for
    >>>>>>> Intel chipsets, than for AMD chipsets. That would be lunacy, and
    >>>>>>> show
    >>>>>>> a lack of proper architecting by the OS manufacturer.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Paul
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> So in the link you gave me it tells you how to enable AHCI in windows
    >>>>>> by means of changing values in the registry.
    >>>>>> What I did was to change the values first, then rebooted into the
    >>>>>> BIOS
    >>>>>> and changed the option there then booted back into win7
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Now what I'd like to know is to do what you say, how should I proceed
    >>>>>> regarding the said win7 registry values. I think I should change the
    >>>>>> registry values first???
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Thanks
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If there was a registry entry for "vanilla" interface mode, then
    >>>>> I'd say
    >>>>> change it. If there isn't a registry entry, it implies the OS checks
    >>>>> each time, for that driver case. That's why I recommended just trying
    >>>>> the BIOS test first, to see if it would work, without doing something
    >>>>> to the registry. If it doesn't work, by just changing the BIOS
    >>>>> from AHCI --> vanilla, then you'd go back to "registry hunting".
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Paul
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Ok, I went into the BIOS and changed the setting back to IDE, rebooted
    >>>> back into win7 ok, then changed the value in the registry, rebooted and
    >>>> all seems ok again.
    >>>>
    >>>> thanks
    >>>
    >>> There was no need to change from AHCI to IDE in order to install and run
    >>> XP. All you need do is to load the mobo AHCI drivers onto a floppy drive
    >>> and when you install XP hit F6 and install the AHCI drivers.
    >>> That way, you can run AHCI for 7 & XP.

    >>
    >> Yes I know, but WinXP is already installed and I have read that if
    >> AHCI is enabled in the BIOS and the boot into WinXP a BSOD occurs.

    >
    > There is a recipe for adding AHCI, that solves the "chicken versus egg"
    > problem with an Intel AHCI driver installation. This would be for adding
    > AHCI support to WinXP, after the fact. (I can't reach the site right now.)
    >
    > http://forum.msi.com.tw/index.php?action=printpage;topic=106575.0
    >
    > Normally, without that hack, being in IDE mode in WinXP, and installing
    > an AHCI driver for an Intel Southbridge, would result in failure to
    > install.
    > And flipping the BIOS setting to AHCI, would cause a failure to boot.
    >
    > But dumping a bunch of crap into the registry, following that recipe,
    > allows a person to hack it so it works.
    >
    > And that hack, only handles a small fraction of all possible situations.
    >
    > Paul


    There must be some part of the actual URL missing because the page does
    /can't load.

    Thanks anyway
     
  10. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Bob H wrote:

    >>
    >> There is a recipe for adding AHCI, that solves the "chicken versus egg"
    >> problem with an Intel AHCI driver installation. This would be for adding
    >> AHCI support to WinXP, after the fact. (I can't reach the site right
    >> now.)
    >>
    >> http://forum.msi.com.tw/index.php?action=printpage;topic=106575.0
    >>
    >> Normally, without that hack, being in IDE mode in WinXP, and installing
    >> an AHCI driver for an Intel Southbridge, would result in failure to
    >> install.
    >> And flipping the BIOS setting to AHCI, would cause a failure to boot.
    >>
    >> But dumping a bunch of crap into the registry, following that recipe,
    >> allows a person to hack it so it works.
    >>
    >> And that hack, only handles a small fraction of all possible situations.
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    > There must be some part of the actual URL missing because the page does
    > /can't load.
    >
    > Thanks anyway


    This link still works. The other link is a "printpage", while this is a
    regular forum rendering.

    http://forum-en.msi.com/index.php?P...ac3992b908d6&topic=106575.msg787092#msg787092

    It's a good thing I kept a copy of the original, as a text file. It
    had that link archived in it.

    Paul
     
  11. Bob H

    Bob H Flightless Bird

    On 06/10/2010 23:12, Paul wrote:
    > Bob H wrote:
    >
    >>>
    >>> There is a recipe for adding AHCI, that solves the "chicken versus egg"
    >>> problem with an Intel AHCI driver installation. This would be for adding
    >>> AHCI support to WinXP, after the fact. (I can't reach the site right
    >>> now.)
    >>>
    >>> http://forum.msi.com.tw/index.php?action=printpage;topic=106575.0
    >>>
    >>> Normally, without that hack, being in IDE mode in WinXP, and installing
    >>> an AHCI driver for an Intel Southbridge, would result in failure to
    >>> install.
    >>> And flipping the BIOS setting to AHCI, would cause a failure to boot.
    >>>
    >>> But dumping a bunch of crap into the registry, following that recipe,
    >>> allows a person to hack it so it works.
    >>>
    >>> And that hack, only handles a small fraction of all possible situations.
    >>>
    >>> Paul

    >>
    >> There must be some part of the actual URL missing because the page
    >> does /can't load.
    >>
    >> Thanks anyway

    >
    > This link still works. The other link is a "printpage", while this is a
    > regular forum rendering.
    >
    > http://forum-en.msi.com/index.php?P...ac3992b908d6&topic=106575.msg787092#msg787092
    >
    >
    > It's a good thing I kept a copy of the original, as a text file. It
    > had that link archived in it.
    >
    > Paul


    I've just had a read of the information there from the new link, and
    although it is interesting reading, it is old, and some of it is not
    relevant here.

    Regarding the previous link, mmm, no it still won't load.

    Thanks
     
  12. Bob H

    Bob H Flightless Bird

    On 07/10/2010 09:22, Bob H wrote:
    > On 06/10/2010 23:12, Paul wrote:
    >> Bob H wrote:
    >>
    >>>>
    >>>> There is a recipe for adding AHCI, that solves the "chicken versus egg"
    >>>> problem with an Intel AHCI driver installation. This would be for
    >>>> adding
    >>>> AHCI support to WinXP, after the fact. (I can't reach the site right
    >>>> now.)
    >>>>
    >>>> http://forum.msi.com.tw/index.php?action=printpage;topic=106575.0
    >>>>
    >>>> Normally, without that hack, being in IDE mode in WinXP, and installing
    >>>> an AHCI driver for an Intel Southbridge, would result in failure to
    >>>> install.
    >>>> And flipping the BIOS setting to AHCI, would cause a failure to boot.
    >>>>
    >>>> But dumping a bunch of crap into the registry, following that recipe,
    >>>> allows a person to hack it so it works.
    >>>>
    >>>> And that hack, only handles a small fraction of all possible
    >>>> situations.
    >>>>
    >>>> Paul
    >>>
    >>> There must be some part of the actual URL missing because the page
    >>> does /can't load.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks anyway

    >>
    >> This link still works. The other link is a "printpage", while this is a
    >> regular forum rendering.
    >>
    >> http://forum-en.msi.com/index.php?P...ac3992b908d6&topic=106575.msg787092#msg787092
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> It's a good thing I kept a copy of the original, as a text file. It
    >> had that link archived in it.
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    > I've just had a read of the information there from the new link, and
    > although it is interesting reading, it is old, and some of it is not
    > relevant here.
    >
    > Regarding the previous link, mmm, no it still won't load.
    >
    > Thanks


    Interestingly, when I had AHCI enabled in BIOS etc, I looked that drive
    properties in Device Manager, and both my SATA drives used:

    C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\disk.sys
    C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\partmgr.sys
    C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\snapman.sys

    And now AHCI is disabled there is no difference, ie same as above.
     
  13. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Bob H wrote:
    > On 07/10/2010 09:22, Bob H wrote:
    >> On 06/10/2010 23:12, Paul wrote:
    >>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> There is a recipe for adding AHCI, that solves the "chicken versus
    >>>>> egg"
    >>>>> problem with an Intel AHCI driver installation. This would be for
    >>>>> adding
    >>>>> AHCI support to WinXP, after the fact. (I can't reach the site right
    >>>>> now.)
    >>>>>
    >>>>> http://forum.msi.com.tw/index.php?action=printpage;topic=106575.0
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Normally, without that hack, being in IDE mode in WinXP, and
    >>>>> installing
    >>>>> an AHCI driver for an Intel Southbridge, would result in failure to
    >>>>> install.
    >>>>> And flipping the BIOS setting to AHCI, would cause a failure to boot.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> But dumping a bunch of crap into the registry, following that recipe,
    >>>>> allows a person to hack it so it works.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> And that hack, only handles a small fraction of all possible
    >>>>> situations.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Paul
    >>>>
    >>>> There must be some part of the actual URL missing because the page
    >>>> does /can't load.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks anyway
    >>>
    >>> This link still works. The other link is a "printpage", while this is a
    >>> regular forum rendering.
    >>>
    >>> http://forum-en.msi.com/index.php?P...ac3992b908d6&topic=106575.msg787092#msg787092
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> It's a good thing I kept a copy of the original, as a text file. It
    >>> had that link archived in it.
    >>>
    >>> Paul

    >>
    >> I've just had a read of the information there from the new link, and
    >> although it is interesting reading, it is old, and some of it is not
    >> relevant here.
    >>
    >> Regarding the previous link, mmm, no it still won't load.
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    > Interestingly, when I had AHCI enabled in BIOS etc, I looked that drive
    > properties in Device Manager, and both my SATA drives used:
    >
    > C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\disk.sys
    > C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\partmgr.sys
    > C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\snapman.sys
    >
    > And now AHCI is disabled there is no difference, ie same as above.
    >


    Is there anything of interest under "IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers" ?

    Paul
     
  14. Bob H

    Bob H Flightless Bird

    On 07/10/2010 10:08, Paul wrote:
    > Bob H wrote:
    >> On 07/10/2010 09:22, Bob H wrote:
    >>> On 06/10/2010 23:12, Paul wrote:
    >>>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> There is a recipe for adding AHCI, that solves the "chicken versus
    >>>>>> egg"
    >>>>>> problem with an Intel AHCI driver installation. This would be for
    >>>>>> adding
    >>>>>> AHCI support to WinXP, after the fact. (I can't reach the site right
    >>>>>> now.)
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> http://forum.msi.com.tw/index.php?action=printpage;topic=106575.0
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Normally, without that hack, being in IDE mode in WinXP, and
    >>>>>> installing
    >>>>>> an AHCI driver for an Intel Southbridge, would result in failure to
    >>>>>> install.
    >>>>>> And flipping the BIOS setting to AHCI, would cause a failure to boot.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> But dumping a bunch of crap into the registry, following that recipe,
    >>>>>> allows a person to hack it so it works.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> And that hack, only handles a small fraction of all possible
    >>>>>> situations.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Paul
    >>>>>
    >>>>> There must be some part of the actual URL missing because the page
    >>>>> does /can't load.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thanks anyway
    >>>>
    >>>> This link still works. The other link is a "printpage", while this is a
    >>>> regular forum rendering.
    >>>>
    >>>> http://forum-en.msi.com/index.php?P...ac3992b908d6&topic=106575.msg787092#msg787092
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> It's a good thing I kept a copy of the original, as a text file. It
    >>>> had that link archived in it.
    >>>>
    >>>> Paul
    >>>
    >>> I've just had a read of the information there from the new link, and
    >>> although it is interesting reading, it is old, and some of it is not
    >>> relevant here.
    >>>
    >>> Regarding the previous link, mmm, no it still won't load.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks

    >>
    >> Interestingly, when I had AHCI enabled in BIOS etc, I looked that
    >> drive properties in Device Manager, and both my SATA drives used:
    >>
    >> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\disk.sys
    >> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\partmgr.sys
    >> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\snapman.sys
    >>
    >> And now AHCI is disabled there is no difference, ie same as above.
    >>

    >
    > Is there anything of interest under "IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers" ?
    >
    > Paul


    Well at the moment, under IDE mode, I have 6 entries under that heading.
    2 entries for ATA Channel 0
    2 entries for ATA channel 1
    1 entries for Intel(R) ICH10 Family 2port Serial ATA storage Controller
    2 - 3A26
    1 entries for Intel(R) ICH10 Family 2port Serial ATA storage Controller
    1 - 3A20


    I tried to boot win7 64bit under AHCI mode again earlier but it wouldn't
    for some reason.
    I made the registry change again, the changed the setting in BIOS from
    IDE to AHCI, rebooted and for some unkown reason win7 threw a wobbly and
    went into repair mode, but couldn't do the repair and said there was no
    OS on the drive.
    Anyway after a couple of reboots and booting normally I got back into
    windows again, thankfully.

    I have no ideas as to what may have happened to cause the said
    situation, but I think I will leave well alone for the time being.

    Thanks
     
  15. Ed Cryer

    Ed Cryer Flightless Bird

    On 07/10/2010 17:04, Bob H wrote:
    > On 07/10/2010 10:08, Paul wrote:
    >> Bob H wrote:
    >>> On 07/10/2010 09:22, Bob H wrote:
    >>>> On 06/10/2010 23:12, Paul wrote:
    >>>>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> There is a recipe for adding AHCI, that solves the "chicken versus
    >>>>>>> egg"
    >>>>>>> problem with an Intel AHCI driver installation. This would be for
    >>>>>>> adding
    >>>>>>> AHCI support to WinXP, after the fact. (I can't reach the site right
    >>>>>>> now.)
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> http://forum.msi.com.tw/index.php?action=printpage;topic=106575.0
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Normally, without that hack, being in IDE mode in WinXP, and
    >>>>>>> installing
    >>>>>>> an AHCI driver for an Intel Southbridge, would result in failure to
    >>>>>>> install.
    >>>>>>> And flipping the BIOS setting to AHCI, would cause a failure to
    >>>>>>> boot.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> But dumping a bunch of crap into the registry, following that
    >>>>>>> recipe,
    >>>>>>> allows a person to hack it so it works.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> And that hack, only handles a small fraction of all possible
    >>>>>>> situations.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Paul
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> There must be some part of the actual URL missing because the page
    >>>>>> does /can't load.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Thanks anyway
    >>>>>
    >>>>> This link still works. The other link is a "printpage", while this
    >>>>> is a
    >>>>> regular forum rendering.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> http://forum-en.msi.com/index.php?P...ac3992b908d6&topic=106575.msg787092#msg787092
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> It's a good thing I kept a copy of the original, as a text file. It
    >>>>> had that link archived in it.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Paul
    >>>>
    >>>> I've just had a read of the information there from the new link, and
    >>>> although it is interesting reading, it is old, and some of it is not
    >>>> relevant here.
    >>>>
    >>>> Regarding the previous link, mmm, no it still won't load.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks
    >>>
    >>> Interestingly, when I had AHCI enabled in BIOS etc, I looked that
    >>> drive properties in Device Manager, and both my SATA drives used:
    >>>
    >>> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\disk.sys
    >>> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\partmgr.sys
    >>> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\snapman.sys
    >>>
    >>> And now AHCI is disabled there is no difference, ie same as above.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Is there anything of interest under "IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers" ?
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    > Well at the moment, under IDE mode, I have 6 entries under that heading.
    > 2 entries for ATA Channel 0
    > 2 entries for ATA channel 1
    > 1 entries for Intel(R) ICH10 Family 2port Serial ATA storage Controller
    > 2 - 3A26
    > 1 entries for Intel(R) ICH10 Family 2port Serial ATA storage Controller
    > 1 - 3A20
    >
    >
    > I tried to boot win7 64bit under AHCI mode again earlier but it wouldn't
    > for some reason.
    > I made the registry change again, the changed the setting in BIOS from
    > IDE to AHCI, rebooted and for some unkown reason win7 threw a wobbly and
    > went into repair mode, but couldn't do the repair and said there was no
    > OS on the drive.
    > Anyway after a couple of reboots and booting normally I got back into
    > windows again, thankfully.
    >
    > I have no ideas as to what may have happened to cause the said
    > situation, but I think I will leave well alone for the time being.
    >
    > Thanks



    I was wondering about that myself. I have a new Acer machine, W7,AHCI
    enabled; and I can't install XP or old Knoppix on it. No floppy drive to
    load drivers.

    All the pundits say switch to Native IDE, but I've been holding back for
    fear that something would go amiss; and I'd end up regretting it.

    If you figure out just how you did manage to reboot W7 again after
    changing about, let me know.

    Ed
     
  16. Bob H

    Bob H Flightless Bird

    On 07/10/2010 17:32, Ed Cryer wrote:
    > On 07/10/2010 17:04, Bob H wrote:
    >> On 07/10/2010 10:08, Paul wrote:
    >>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>> On 07/10/2010 09:22, Bob H wrote:
    >>>>> On 06/10/2010 23:12, Paul wrote:
    >>>>>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> There is a recipe for adding AHCI, that solves the "chicken versus
    >>>>>>>> egg"
    >>>>>>>> problem with an Intel AHCI driver installation. This would be for
    >>>>>>>> adding
    >>>>>>>> AHCI support to WinXP, after the fact. (I can't reach the site
    >>>>>>>> right
    >>>>>>>> now.)
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> http://forum.msi.com.tw/index.php?action=printpage;topic=106575.0
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Normally, without that hack, being in IDE mode in WinXP, and
    >>>>>>>> installing
    >>>>>>>> an AHCI driver for an Intel Southbridge, would result in failure to
    >>>>>>>> install.
    >>>>>>>> And flipping the BIOS setting to AHCI, would cause a failure to
    >>>>>>>> boot.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> But dumping a bunch of crap into the registry, following that
    >>>>>>>> recipe,
    >>>>>>>> allows a person to hack it so it works.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> And that hack, only handles a small fraction of all possible
    >>>>>>>> situations.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Paul
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> There must be some part of the actual URL missing because the page
    >>>>>>> does /can't load.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Thanks anyway
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> This link still works. The other link is a "printpage", while this
    >>>>>> is a
    >>>>>> regular forum rendering.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> http://forum-en.msi.com/index.php?P...ac3992b908d6&topic=106575.msg787092#msg787092
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> It's a good thing I kept a copy of the original, as a text file. It
    >>>>>> had that link archived in it.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Paul
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I've just had a read of the information there from the new link, and
    >>>>> although it is interesting reading, it is old, and some of it is not
    >>>>> relevant here.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Regarding the previous link, mmm, no it still won't load.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thanks
    >>>>
    >>>> Interestingly, when I had AHCI enabled in BIOS etc, I looked that
    >>>> drive properties in Device Manager, and both my SATA drives used:
    >>>>
    >>>> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\disk.sys
    >>>> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\partmgr.sys
    >>>> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\snapman.sys
    >>>>
    >>>> And now AHCI is disabled there is no difference, ie same as above.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Is there anything of interest under "IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers" ?
    >>>
    >>> Paul

    >>
    >> Well at the moment, under IDE mode, I have 6 entries under that heading.
    >> 2 entries for ATA Channel 0
    >> 2 entries for ATA channel 1
    >> 1 entries for Intel(R) ICH10 Family 2port Serial ATA storage Controller
    >> 2 - 3A26
    >> 1 entries for Intel(R) ICH10 Family 2port Serial ATA storage Controller
    >> 1 - 3A20
    >>
    >>
    >> I tried to boot win7 64bit under AHCI mode again earlier but it wouldn't
    >> for some reason.
    >> I made the registry change again, the changed the setting in BIOS from
    >> IDE to AHCI, rebooted and for some unkown reason win7 threw a wobbly and
    >> went into repair mode, but couldn't do the repair and said there was no
    >> OS on the drive.
    >> Anyway after a couple of reboots and booting normally I got back into
    >> windows again, thankfully.
    >>
    >> I have no ideas as to what may have happened to cause the said
    >> situation, but I think I will leave well alone for the time being.
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    >
    > I was wondering about that myself. I have a new Acer machine, W7,AHCI
    > enabled; and I can't install XP or old Knoppix on it. No floppy drive to
    > load drivers.
    >
    > All the pundits say switch to Native IDE, but I've been holding back for
    > fear that something would go amiss; and I'd end up regretting it.
    >
    > If you figure out just how you did manage to reboot W7 again after
    > changing about, let me know.
    >
    > Ed
    >


    AFAIK, there is a registry change to be made:

    - Run Registry Editor
    - Go to HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Msahci
    - Change the "Start" value to 0
    - Reboot and go to BIOS immediately
    - Set BIOS to AHCI

    The next time you load Windows, it will auto-detect the AHCI.

    Now that is to enable AHCI, but to disable it I would say go into the
    reg file, change the said setting from 0 to 3, reboot then go into the
    BIOS and change from AHCI to IDE.

    Now in theory that should work, but it didn't in my case.

    When Win7 threw the wobbly, as I said it went into repair mode and I let
    it do its thing. Then it took a few reboots and repairs to enable normal
    booting.

    I have just checked the registry entry which I changed previously from 0
    to 3, and it is or has changed back to 0 again, so maybe the repair mode
    did that. I honestly don't know how or what happened only what has happened.
     
  17. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Ed Cryer wrote:
    > On 07/10/2010 17:04, Bob H wrote:
    >> On 07/10/2010 10:08, Paul wrote:
    >>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>> On 07/10/2010 09:22, Bob H wrote:
    >>>>> On 06/10/2010 23:12, Paul wrote:
    >>>>>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> There is a recipe for adding AHCI, that solves the "chicken versus
    >>>>>>>> egg"
    >>>>>>>> problem with an Intel AHCI driver installation. This would be for
    >>>>>>>> adding
    >>>>>>>> AHCI support to WinXP, after the fact. (I can't reach the site
    >>>>>>>> right
    >>>>>>>> now.)
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> http://forum.msi.com.tw/index.php?action=printpage;topic=106575.0
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Normally, without that hack, being in IDE mode in WinXP, and
    >>>>>>>> installing
    >>>>>>>> an AHCI driver for an Intel Southbridge, would result in failure to
    >>>>>>>> install.
    >>>>>>>> And flipping the BIOS setting to AHCI, would cause a failure to
    >>>>>>>> boot.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> But dumping a bunch of crap into the registry, following that
    >>>>>>>> recipe,
    >>>>>>>> allows a person to hack it so it works.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> And that hack, only handles a small fraction of all possible
    >>>>>>>> situations.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Paul
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> There must be some part of the actual URL missing because the page
    >>>>>>> does /can't load.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Thanks anyway
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> This link still works. The other link is a "printpage", while this
    >>>>>> is a
    >>>>>> regular forum rendering.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> http://forum-en.msi.com/index.php?P...ac3992b908d6&topic=106575.msg787092#msg787092
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> It's a good thing I kept a copy of the original, as a text file. It
    >>>>>> had that link archived in it.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Paul
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I've just had a read of the information there from the new link, and
    >>>>> although it is interesting reading, it is old, and some of it is not
    >>>>> relevant here.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Regarding the previous link, mmm, no it still won't load.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thanks
    >>>>
    >>>> Interestingly, when I had AHCI enabled in BIOS etc, I looked that
    >>>> drive properties in Device Manager, and both my SATA drives used:
    >>>>
    >>>> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\disk.sys
    >>>> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\partmgr.sys
    >>>> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\snapman.sys
    >>>>
    >>>> And now AHCI is disabled there is no difference, ie same as above.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Is there anything of interest under "IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers" ?
    >>>
    >>> Paul

    >>
    >> Well at the moment, under IDE mode, I have 6 entries under that heading.
    >> 2 entries for ATA Channel 0
    >> 2 entries for ATA channel 1
    >> 1 entries for Intel(R) ICH10 Family 2port Serial ATA storage Controller
    >> 2 - 3A26
    >> 1 entries for Intel(R) ICH10 Family 2port Serial ATA storage Controller
    >> 1 - 3A20
    >>
    >>
    >> I tried to boot win7 64bit under AHCI mode again earlier but it wouldn't
    >> for some reason.
    >> I made the registry change again, the changed the setting in BIOS from
    >> IDE to AHCI, rebooted and for some unkown reason win7 threw a wobbly and
    >> went into repair mode, but couldn't do the repair and said there was no
    >> OS on the drive.
    >> Anyway after a couple of reboots and booting normally I got back into
    >> windows again, thankfully.
    >>
    >> I have no ideas as to what may have happened to cause the said
    >> situation, but I think I will leave well alone for the time being.
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    >
    > I was wondering about that myself. I have a new Acer machine, W7,AHCI
    > enabled; and I can't install XP or old Knoppix on it. No floppy drive to
    > load drivers.
    >
    > All the pundits say switch to Native IDE, but I've been holding back for
    > fear that something would go amiss; and I'd end up regretting it.
    >
    > If you figure out just how you did manage to reboot W7 again after
    > changing about, let me know.
    >
    > Ed
    >


    A possible solution, for installing WinXP on a Windows 7 PC without floppy,
    would be to "slipstream" the necessary driver files with NLite. You start
    with a copy of your WinXP installer CD, and NLite allows you to add drivers,
    then the output ISO9660 file is used, with a program like Nero or Imgburn,
    to burn a new installer CD. Note that only certain formats of drivers
    are accepted this way. You would hope a flat collection of TXTSETUP.OEM
    and friends, would work. (The last time I did this, I used the
    AutoStreamer program for a similar purpose, but this is the latest
    and greatest tool for the job. NLite handles both Service Packs and
    adding drivers.)

    http://www.nliteos.com/guide/part1.html

    Alternately, you could try a USB floppy, but I don't know how well that
    works. I haven't tested that here at all. I have a USB floppy, so it
    wouldn't be hard to do. Trouble is though, I also have a regular floppy,
    and you have to be careful because of what the regular floppy does
    to the drive letters. It could be, that if I were to attempt to
    F6 a driver with a USB floppy, the drive letter would be wrong.
    If a motherboard doesn't have a floppy, then good design is to
    disable the logic block in the SuperI/O, so it doesn't affect
    drive letters. I presume that is done via the BIOS design (just
    a firmware setting, to make any unused logic blocks, "go away").

    I vaguely recollect testing the USB floppy at some point, and
    disabling the floppy drive in the BIOS, made the USB floppy become
    A:/ . And for whatever I was doing at the time, that seemed to be
    good enough. But I wasn't installing WinXP at the time though.
    Some other little experiment.

    Paul
     
  18. Bob H

    Bob H Flightless Bird

    On 07/10/2010 18:38, Paul wrote:
    > Ed Cryer wrote:
    >> On 07/10/2010 17:04, Bob H wrote:
    >>> On 07/10/2010 10:08, Paul wrote:
    >>>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>>> On 07/10/2010 09:22, Bob H wrote:
    >>>>>> On 06/10/2010 23:12, Paul wrote:
    >>>>>>> Bob H wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> There is a recipe for adding AHCI, that solves the "chicken versus
    >>>>>>>>> egg"
    >>>>>>>>> problem with an Intel AHCI driver installation. This would be for
    >>>>>>>>> adding
    >>>>>>>>> AHCI support to WinXP, after the fact. (I can't reach the site
    >>>>>>>>> right
    >>>>>>>>> now.)
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> http://forum.msi.com.tw/index.php?action=printpage;topic=106575.0
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Normally, without that hack, being in IDE mode in WinXP, and
    >>>>>>>>> installing
    >>>>>>>>> an AHCI driver for an Intel Southbridge, would result in
    >>>>>>>>> failure to
    >>>>>>>>> install.
    >>>>>>>>> And flipping the BIOS setting to AHCI, would cause a failure to
    >>>>>>>>> boot.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> But dumping a bunch of crap into the registry, following that
    >>>>>>>>> recipe,
    >>>>>>>>> allows a person to hack it so it works.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> And that hack, only handles a small fraction of all possible
    >>>>>>>>> situations.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Paul
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> There must be some part of the actual URL missing because the page
    >>>>>>>> does /can't load.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Thanks anyway
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> This link still works. The other link is a "printpage", while this
    >>>>>>> is a
    >>>>>>> regular forum rendering.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> http://forum-en.msi.com/index.php?P...ac3992b908d6&topic=106575.msg787092#msg787092
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> It's a good thing I kept a copy of the original, as a text file. It
    >>>>>>> had that link archived in it.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Paul
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I've just had a read of the information there from the new link, and
    >>>>>> although it is interesting reading, it is old, and some of it is not
    >>>>>> relevant here.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Regarding the previous link, mmm, no it still won't load.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Thanks
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Interestingly, when I had AHCI enabled in BIOS etc, I looked that
    >>>>> drive properties in Device Manager, and both my SATA drives used:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\disk.sys
    >>>>> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\partmgr.sys
    >>>>> C:/Windows\system32\DRIVERS\snapman.sys
    >>>>>
    >>>>> And now AHCI is disabled there is no difference, ie same as above.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Is there anything of interest under "IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers" ?
    >>>>
    >>>> Paul
    >>>
    >>> Well at the moment, under IDE mode, I have 6 entries under that heading.
    >>> 2 entries for ATA Channel 0
    >>> 2 entries for ATA channel 1
    >>> 1 entries for Intel(R) ICH10 Family 2port Serial ATA storage Controller
    >>> 2 - 3A26
    >>> 1 entries for Intel(R) ICH10 Family 2port Serial ATA storage Controller
    >>> 1 - 3A20
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I tried to boot win7 64bit under AHCI mode again earlier but it wouldn't
    >>> for some reason.
    >>> I made the registry change again, the changed the setting in BIOS from
    >>> IDE to AHCI, rebooted and for some unkown reason win7 threw a wobbly and
    >>> went into repair mode, but couldn't do the repair and said there was no
    >>> OS on the drive.
    >>> Anyway after a couple of reboots and booting normally I got back into
    >>> windows again, thankfully.
    >>>
    >>> I have no ideas as to what may have happened to cause the said
    >>> situation, but I think I will leave well alone for the time being.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks

    >>
    >>
    >> I was wondering about that myself. I have a new Acer machine, W7,AHCI
    >> enabled; and I can't install XP or old Knoppix on it. No floppy drive
    >> to load drivers.
    >>
    >> All the pundits say switch to Native IDE, but I've been holding back
    >> for fear that something would go amiss; and I'd end up regretting it.
    >>
    >> If you figure out just how you did manage to reboot W7 again after
    >> changing about, let me know.
    >>
    >> Ed
    >>

    >
    > A possible solution, for installing WinXP on a Windows 7 PC without floppy,
    > would be to "slipstream" the necessary driver files with NLite. You start
    > with a copy of your WinXP installer CD, and NLite allows you to add
    > drivers,
    > then the output ISO9660 file is used, with a program like Nero or Imgburn,
    > to burn a new installer CD. Note that only certain formats of drivers
    > are accepted this way. You would hope a flat collection of TXTSETUP.OEM
    > and friends, would work. (The last time I did this, I used the
    > AutoStreamer program for a similar purpose, but this is the latest
    > and greatest tool for the job. NLite handles both Service Packs and
    > adding drivers.)
    >
    > http://www.nliteos.com/guide/part1.html
    >
    > Alternately, you could try a USB floppy, but I don't know how well that
    > works. I haven't tested that here at all. I have a USB floppy, so it
    > wouldn't be hard to do. Trouble is though, I also have a regular floppy,
    > and you have to be careful because of what the regular floppy does
    > to the drive letters. It could be, that if I were to attempt to
    > F6 a driver with a USB floppy, the drive letter would be wrong.
    > If a motherboard doesn't have a floppy, then good design is to
    > disable the logic block in the SuperI/O, so it doesn't affect
    > drive letters. I presume that is done via the BIOS design (just
    > a firmware setting, to make any unused logic blocks, "go away").
    >
    > I vaguely recollect testing the USB floppy at some point, and
    > disabling the floppy drive in the BIOS, made the USB floppy become
    > A:/ . And for whatever I was doing at the time, that seemed to be
    > good enough. But I wasn't installing WinXP at the time though.
    > Some other little experiment.
    >
    > Paul


    Yes, I have done some slipstreaming before with my WINXP disc where I
    slipstreamed the service packs into the original files.
    At the moment I don't want tore install WinXP as it is fine as it is.

    Maybe in the future I will do away with XP, I don't know yet.

    I would be curious to know what happened to my win7 system when it
    wouldn't boot straight back to the desktop before and the registry
    setting changed etc.
     
  19. Yousuf Khan

    Yousuf Khan Flightless Bird

    On 06/10/2010 1:09 PM, Bob H wrote:
    > I have recently enabled AHCI on my Win7 64 bit system which has 2 SATA
    > HD's and dual boots with WinXP 43 bit.
    > I haven't used WinXP for a while but that's not to say I won't.
    > From what I have read, whilst enabling AHCI for Win7, may well render
    > WinXP un bootable.
    > I don't have any problems with my Win7 system, but have found that there
    > doesn't seem to be any noticeable advantage of having AHCI turned on.
    > I use a driver update program which has backed up all my drivers prior
    > to installing updates earlier this week.
    > What I would like to know is can I restore the old drivers, then turn
    > off AHCI in the BIOS, so that WinXP will boot ok.
    >
    > The reason I have posted on here is because I cannot find any relevant
    > information otherwise
    >
    > Thanks


    Sorry, I saw this thread too late, it looks like there's already been a
    lot of discussion on it. However, one thing I noticed is that once you
    set the registry to enable AHCI in Win7, you don't need to change the
    registry again to go back to using IDE drivers. Just leave the registry
    as it is with AHCI and it'll know which are the proper drivers to choose.

    The registry hack is to allow Windows to properly detect whether it's
    running on IDE-compatibility or AHCI mode drivers. When Windows first
    installs it locks it down to either AHCI or IDE depending on how you
    first installed it, and prevents further boot-time detection (presumably
    to speed up some kind of process). However, you can leave the registry
    exactly as suggested for AHCI even while using IDE-compatibility mode.

    Yousuf Khan
     
  20. Bob H

    Bob H Flightless Bird

    On 07/10/2010 23:57, Yousuf Khan wrote:
    > On 06/10/2010 1:09 PM, Bob H wrote:
    >> I have recently enabled AHCI on my Win7 64 bit system which has 2 SATA
    >> HD's and dual boots with WinXP 43 bit.
    >> I haven't used WinXP for a while but that's not to say I won't.
    >> From what I have read, whilst enabling AHCI for Win7, may well render
    >> WinXP un bootable.
    >> I don't have any problems with my Win7 system, but have found that there
    >> doesn't seem to be any noticeable advantage of having AHCI turned on.
    >> I use a driver update program which has backed up all my drivers prior
    >> to installing updates earlier this week.
    >> What I would like to know is can I restore the old drivers, then turn
    >> off AHCI in the BIOS, so that WinXP will boot ok.
    >>
    >> The reason I have posted on here is because I cannot find any relevant
    >> information otherwise
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    > Sorry, I saw this thread too late, it looks like there's already been a
    > lot of discussion on it. However, one thing I noticed is that once you
    > set the registry to enable AHCI in Win7, you don't need to change the
    > registry again to go back to using IDE drivers. Just leave the registry
    > as it is with AHCI and it'll know which are the proper drivers to choose.
    >
    > The registry hack is to allow Windows to properly detect whether it's
    > running on IDE-compatibility or AHCI mode drivers. When Windows first
    > installs it locks it down to either AHCI or IDE depending on how you
    > first installed it, and prevents further boot-time detection (presumably
    > to speed up some kind of process). However, you can leave the registry
    > exactly as suggested for AHCI even while using IDE-compatibility mode.
    >
    > Yousuf Khan



    Thanks for the information Yousuf. A little late as you say but still
    good to know.

    If you read one of my latest post on this subject, this is what I posted:

    >'I tried to boot win7 64bit under AHCI mode again earlier but it
    >wouldn't for some reason.
    >I made the registry change again, then changed the setting in BIOS
    >from IDE to AHCI, rebooted and for some unkown reason win7 threw a

    <wobbly and went into repair mode, but couldn't do the repair and said
    >there was no OS on the drive.
    >Anyway after a couple of reboots and booting normally I got back into
    >windows again, thankfully.


    >I have no ideas as to what may have happened to cause the said
    >situation, but I think I will leave well alone for the time being.'


    Then I posted this:
    When Win7 threw the wobbly, as I said it went into repair mode and I let
    it do its thing. Then it took a few reboots and repairs to enable normal
    booting.

    I have just checked the registry entry which I changed previously from 0
    to 3, and it is or has changed back to 0 again, so maybe the repair mode
    did that. I honestly don't know how or what happened only what has
    happened.


    So you have now clarified the above situation , in that I should not
    have made any further changes to the registry setting.
    Now the registry setting is at 0 for AHCI mode should I wish to change
    back to that in the BIOS.

    Thanks
     

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