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Activation of XP in a new hard drive in the same computer?

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Beyond X, Jul 26, 2010.

  1. Beyond X

    Beyond X Flightless Bird

    This question must have been hundreds times, but please help.

    I want to know what the Microsoft policy is concerning licensing its
    softwars. In particular:
    1) I need to alternate two or three hard drives in the SAME computer
    depending on the kind of work I do. The platform installed in my current
    routine hard drive is Win XP Pro which is 'genuine' with legitimate
    product key. When it was activated, I believe, Microsoft collected
    information specific to this particular hard drive product together with
    discriminatory information about the computer's hardware set up
    (motherboard, memory card, CPU, graphic card, etc).
    Now, if I replace the hard drive and install the same OS from the
    SAME CD (with the same product key) followed by going through new
    activation process, I am sure that the activation attempt will pass
    (because the OS software is 'genuine').
    Then, when I switch back to the previous harddisk in which the same
    OS with the same product key has been installed, what will happen? Will
    it work without complication? Or will it need to go through another
    activation and safely? (I will not and will not be able to use the two
    drives simultaneously.)
    If so how many times will I be permitted to do such a switching if
    there is a limit to it?
    (Does information about successful activation stay inside the disk or is
    it in MS's activation database and checked out every time the disk is
    used?)

    2) If I install the same OS in a deifferent partition in the same hard
    drive and use it in the same computer, what will happen?

    My thought:
    What Microsoft wants is prevention of a software from its use in
    "different computers" at the same time, isn't it? That is, MS does not
    want piracy. When we purchase a "genuine" MS software, however, we own
    it with every right of the ownership and we should be able to use it in
    every way we want as long as we do not commit piracy or illegal
    transaction, right?
     
  2. Paul

    Paul Flightless Bird

    Beyond X wrote:
    > This question must have been hundreds times, but please help.
    >
    > I want to know what the Microsoft policy is concerning licensing its
    > softwars. In particular:
    > 1) I need to alternate two or three hard drives in the SAME computer
    > depending on the kind of work I do. The platform installed in my current
    > routine hard drive is Win XP Pro which is 'genuine' with legitimate
    > product key. When it was activated, I believe, Microsoft collected
    > information specific to this particular hard drive product together with
    > discriminatory information about the computer's hardware set up
    > (motherboard, memory card, CPU, graphic card, etc).
    > Now, if I replace the hard drive and install the same OS from the
    > SAME CD (with the same product key) followed by going through new
    > activation process, I am sure that the activation attempt will pass
    > (because the OS software is 'genuine').
    > Then, when I switch back to the previous harddisk in which the same
    > OS with the same product key has been installed, what will happen? Will
    > it work without complication? Or will it need to go through another
    > activation and safely? (I will not and will not be able to use the two
    > drives simultaneously.)
    > If so how many times will I be permitted to do such a switching if
    > there is a limit to it?
    > (Does information about successful activation stay inside the disk or is
    > it in MS's activation database and checked out every time the disk is
    > used?)
    >
    > 2) If I install the same OS in a deifferent partition in the same hard
    > drive and use it in the same computer, what will happen?
    >
    > My thought:
    > What Microsoft wants is prevention of a software from its use in
    > "different computers" at the same time, isn't it? That is, MS does not
    > want piracy. When we purchase a "genuine" MS software, however, we own
    > it with every right of the ownership and we should be able to use it in
    > every way we want as long as we do not commit piracy or illegal
    > transaction, right?


    You can find details of the algorithm here.

    http://aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.htm

    Enjoy,
    Paul
     
  3. Alias

    Alias Flightless Bird

    On 07/27/2010 08:20 AM, Beyond X wrote:
    > This question must have been hundreds times, but please help.
    >
    > I want to know what the Microsoft policy is concerning licensing its
    > softwars. In particular:
    > 1) I need to alternate two or three hard drives in the SAME computer
    > depending on the kind of work I do. The platform installed in my current
    > routine hard drive is Win XP Pro which is 'genuine' with legitimate
    > product key. When it was activated, I believe, Microsoft collected
    > information specific to this particular hard drive product together with
    > discriminatory information about the computer's hardware set up
    > (motherboard, memory card, CPU, graphic card, etc).
    > Now, if I replace the hard drive and install the same OS from the SAME
    > CD (with the same product key) followed by going through new activation
    > process, I am sure that the activation attempt will pass (because the OS
    > software is 'genuine').
    > Then, when I switch back to the previous harddisk in which the same OS
    > with the same product key has been installed, what will happen? Will it
    > work without complication? Or will it need to go through another
    > activation and safely? (I will not and will not be able to use the two
    > drives simultaneously.)
    > If so how many times will I be permitted to do such a switching if there
    > is a limit to it?
    > (Does information about successful activation stay inside the disk or is
    > it in MS's activation database and checked out every time the disk is
    > used?)
    >
    > 2) If I install the same OS in a deifferent partition in the same hard
    > drive and use it in the same computer, what will happen?
    >
    > My thought:
    > What Microsoft wants is prevention of a software from its use in
    > "different computers" at the same time, isn't it? That is, MS does not
    > want piracy. When we purchase a "genuine" MS software, however, we own
    > it with every right of the ownership and we should be able to use it in
    > every way we want as long as we do not commit piracy or illegal
    > transaction, right?


    As long as it's the same computer, you can have two or more instances of
    XP. I would recommend cloning so that the new ones are already
    activated. The clones could be considered as back ups.

    --
    Alias
     
  4. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In news:4C4E7ABB.8090400@nomail.com,
    Beyond X <donotmail@nomail.com> typed:
    > This question must have been hundreds times, but please
    > help.
    > I want to know what the Microsoft policy is concerning
    > licensing its softwars. In particular:
    > 1) I need to alternate two or three hard drives in the SAME
    > computer depending on the kind of work I do. The platform
    > installed in my current routine hard drive is Win XP Pro
    > which is 'genuine' with legitimate product key. When it was
    > activated, I believe, Microsoft collected information
    > specific to this particular hard drive product together
    > with discriminatory information about the computer's
    > hardware set up (motherboard, memory card, CPU, graphic
    > card, etc). Now, if I replace the hard drive and install
    > the same OS from the SAME CD (with the same product key) followed by
    > going
    > through new activation process, I am sure that the
    > activation attempt will pass (because the OS software is
    > 'genuine'). Then, when I switch back to the previous
    > harddisk in which the same OS with the same product key has been
    > installed, what will
    > happen? Will it work without complication? Or will it need
    > to go through another activation and safely? (I will not
    > and will not be able to use the two drives simultaneously.)
    > If so how many times will I be permitted to do such a
    > switching if there is a limit to it?
    > (Does information about successful activation stay inside
    > the disk or is it in MS's activation database and checked
    > out every time the disk is used?)
    >
    > 2) If I install the same OS in a deifferent partition in
    > the same hard drive and use it in the same computer, what
    > will happen?


    Looks like you have answers to the above. Mostly, it's IMO a "try it and
    see". It'll depend on how it reacts to seeing the two different hard
    drives - they don't have the same identity internally and will be seen as
    different drives. What it may trigger though is anyone's guess, I think.
    Worst case you'd end up having to make a phone call, I'd think.

    >
    > My thought:
    > What Microsoft wants is prevention of a software from its
    > use in "different computers" at the same time, isn't it?
    > That is, MS does not want piracy. When we purchase a
    > "genuine" MS software, however, we own it with every right
    > of the ownership and we should be able to use it in every
    > way we want as long as we do not commit piracy or illegal
    > transaction, right?


    Wrong, wrong and wrong. You do NOT "own" the software. It remains the
    property of Microsoft. You only have a "license" to use ONE instance of the
    program/s at a time on ONE computer. You can not have two installations of
    XP without having at least two licenses for it.
    You need to read your EULA.
    So, no, you do NOT own t wth every right of ownership; Microsoft owns it!
    You only license it from them. You can use it only exactly as specified in
    the EULA (End User LIcense Agreement).

    HTH,

    Twayne`
     
  5. Peter

    Peter Flightless Bird

    On 07/27/2010 07:52 PM, Twayne wrote:
    > Wrong, wrong and wrong. You do NOT "own" the software. It remains the
    > property of Microsoft. You only have a "license" to use ONE instance of the
    > program/s at a time on ONE computer. You can not have two installations of
    > XP without having at least two licenses for it.


    So, you're saying cloning a drive to another drive as a back up is a no
    no? Are you also saying that the EULA sets a time limit on how long you
    can test a clone to make sure it got cloned properly? Or, are you saying
    you can't have two installs of XP on two different machines with only
    one license? Or you can't dual boot from one XP hard drive with another?
    What *are* you saying?

    > You need to read your EULA.


    Been there, done that, wore out the T-Shirt. It's mainly about what you
    they don't want you to do with what you bought and how MS bears no
    responsibility, yada, yada, yada.

    > So, no, you do NOT own t wth every right of ownership; Microsoft owns it!
    > You only license it from them. You can use it only exactly as specified in
    > the EULA (End User LIcense Agreement).
    >
    > HTH,
    >
    > Twayne`


    You mean you only *may* use it only exactly as specified in the EULA.
    What you *can* do with it is another story.

    --
    Peter
     
  6. Daave

    Daave Flightless Bird

    Peter wrote:
    > On 07/27/2010 07:52 PM, Twayne wrote:
    >> Wrong, wrong and wrong. You do NOT "own" the software. It remains the
    >> property of Microsoft. You only have a "license" to use ONE
    >> instance of the program/s at a time on ONE computer. You can not
    >> have two installations of XP without having at least two licenses
    >> for it.

    >
    > So, you're saying cloning a drive to another drive as a back up is a
    > no no?


    Presumably, if it's a clone, it's not being used if the original hard
    drive is still being used. And if you swap the drives, then the original
    drive is no longer being used. AFAIK, the EULA allows for the swapping
    of drives in this fashion ad infinitum. Or alternating booting from two
    (or more) bootable drives. If you place the cloned drive in another PC
    that does not have a license to run that particular OS (and booted off
    that cloned drive), then that would clearly be a breach of the
    agreement.
     
  7. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In news:i2nr8g$skt$1@speranza.aioe.org,
    Peter <nospam@nospam.com.invalid> typed:
    > On 07/27/2010 07:52 PM, Twayne wrote:
    >> Wrong, wrong and wrong. You do NOT "own" the software. It
    >> remains the property of Microsoft. You only have a
    >> "license" to use ONE instance of the program/s at a time
    >> on ONE computer. You can not have two installations of XP
    >> without having at least two licenses for it.

    >
    > So, you're saying cloning a drive to another drive as a
    > back up is a no no? Are you also saying that the EULA sets
    > a time limit on how long you can test a clone to make sure
    > it got cloned properly? Or, are you saying you can't have
    > two installs of XP on two different machines with only one
    > license? Or you can't dual boot from one XP hard drive with
    > another? What *are* you saying?


    Nope! Got my tongue in front of my eye teeth & didn't see the OP correctly.
    Sorry. Reading the EULA is still the best route, though: It says you can
    create ONE backup disk in most cases, but I don't have time to read the
    specific OS EULA right now. The OS EULA and say the Office EULA are
    different, so a read of it would be necessary in this case. Like, does it
    say CD and not HD?
    OTOH, what could it hurt, as long as it was never used in a different
    machine other than has already been discussed here? It gets down to being
    pretty picky setting HD vs CD unless the EULA specifically defines
    something, so ... that's where I'd go.



    >
    >> You need to read your EULA.

    >
    > Been there, done that, wore out the T-Shirt. It's mainly
    > about what you they don't want you to do with what you
    > bought and how MS bears no responsibility, yada, yada, yada.
    >
    >> So, no, you do NOT own t wth every right of ownership;
    >> Microsoft owns it! You only license it from them. You can
    >> use it only exactly as specified in the EULA (End User
    >> LIcense Agreement). HTH,
    >>
    >> Twayne`

    >
    > You mean you only *may* use it only exactly as specified in
    > the EULA. What you *can* do with it is another story.


    lol, maybe so in the classroom! If it's MS saying it, they are telling you
    what you CAN do with it. You MAY NOT do anything else<g>. It's like
    participles; sometimes it's hard to not use a participle without it hanging,
    on the end, of a sentence, about something, sort of. lol

    HTH,

    Twayne`
     
  8. Eddie

    Eddie Flightless Bird


    > Wrong, wrong and wrong. You do NOT "own" the software. It remains the
    > property of Microsoft. You only have a "license" to use ONE instance of the
    > program/s at a time on ONE computer. You can not have two installations of
    > XP without having at least two licenses for it.
    > You need to read your EULA.
    > So, no, you do NOT own t wth every right of ownership; Microsoft owns it!
    > You only license it from them. You can use it only exactly as specified in
    > the EULA (End User LIcense Agreement).
    >
    > HTH,
    >
    > Twayne`
    >


    So, does that mean I can't use it (cd) as a frisbee or for skeet
    shootin'? I guess not because that would mean I altered the content.
    I wonder if micro has ownership of the cd or the content.

    Ed
     
  9. Do Dah Zippity

    Do Dah Zippity Flightless Bird

    : >
    :
    : So, does that mean I can't use it (cd) as a frisbee or for skeet
    : shootin'? I guess not because that would mean I altered the content.
    : I wonder if micro has ownership of the cd or the content.
    :
    : Ed

    It means you are a high-ranking HoopleHead.
     
  10. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor Flightless Bird

    On 7/29/2010 4:04 AM, Twayne wrote:

    >> You mean you only *may* use it only exactly as specified in
    >> the EULA. What you *can* do with it is another story.

    >
    > lol, maybe so in the classroom! If it's MS saying it, they are telling you
    > what you CAN do with it. You MAY NOT do anything else<g>. It's like
    > participles; sometimes it's hard to not use a participle without it hanging,
    > on the end, of a sentence, about something, sort of. lol
    >
    > HTH,
    >
    > Twayne`
    >
    >


    For example, if you want to have the same XP license on two different
    computers, all you have to do is wait 120 days after the first install
    was activated and then you can install it on another machine and it will
    activate, become genuine, etc. The EULA says you *may* not do that but
    in practice, you *can*. The same thing is true with Office. It doesn't
    matter if the license is OEM or Retail. The only time you would would
    have a problem is if the license is a branded OEM from the likes of
    Acer, HP or Dell.

    --
    Peter Taylor
     
  11. Twayne

    Twayne Flightless Bird

    In news:i2s022$hs9$1@news.eternal-september.org,
    Peter Taylor <fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> typed:
    > On 7/29/2010 4:04 AM, Twayne wrote:
    >
    >>> You mean you only *may* use it only exactly as specified
    >>> in the EULA. What you *can* do with it is another story.

    >>
    >> lol, maybe so in the classroom! If it's MS saying it, they
    >> are telling you what you CAN do with it. You MAY NOT do
    >> anything else<g>. It's like participles; sometimes it's
    >> hard to not use a participle without it hanging, on the
    >> end, of a sentence, about something, sort of. lol HTH,
    >>
    >> Twayne`
    >>
    >>

    >
    > For example, if you want to have the same XP license on two
    > different computers, all you have to do is wait 120 days
    > after the first install was activated and then you can
    > install it on another machine and it will activate, become
    > genuine, etc. The EULA says you *may* not do that but in
    > practice, you *can*. The same thing is true with Office. It
    > doesn't matter if the license is OEM or Retail. The only
    > time you would would have a problem is if the license is a
    > branded OEM from the likes of Acer, HP or Dell.


    Untl you come to wanting to do updates or anything with the MS site that
    requires verification. 120 days doesn't mean the old records don't exist;
    they do.
     
  12. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor Flightless Bird

    On 7/29/2010 4:59 PM, Twayne wrote:
    > In news:i2s022$hs9$1@news.eternal-september.org,
    > Peter Taylor<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> typed:
    >> On 7/29/2010 4:04 AM, Twayne wrote:
    >>
    >>>> You mean you only *may* use it only exactly as specified
    >>>> in the EULA. What you *can* do with it is another story.
    >>>
    >>> lol, maybe so in the classroom! If it's MS saying it, they
    >>> are telling you what you CAN do with it. You MAY NOT do
    >>> anything else<g>. It's like participles; sometimes it's
    >>> hard to not use a participle without it hanging, on the
    >>> end, of a sentence, about something, sort of. lol HTH,
    >>>
    >>> Twayne`
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> For example, if you want to have the same XP license on two
    >> different computers, all you have to do is wait 120 days
    >> after the first install was activated and then you can
    >> install it on another machine and it will activate, become
    >> genuine, etc. The EULA says you *may* not do that but in
    >> practice, you *can*. The same thing is true with Office. It
    >> doesn't matter if the license is OEM or Retail. The only
    >> time you would would have a problem is if the license is a
    >> branded OEM from the likes of Acer, HP or Dell.

    >
    > Untl you come to wanting to do updates or anything with the MS site that
    > requires verification. 120 days doesn't mean the old records don't exist;
    > they do.
    >
    >


    No, they don't. They wipe the slate every 120 days.

    --
    Peter Taylor
     
  13. Doum

    Doum Flightless Bird

    Peter Taylor <fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> écrivait
    news:i2s5e2$a72$1@news.eternal-september.org:

    > On 7/29/2010 4:59 PM, Twayne wrote:
    >> In news:i2s022$hs9$1@news.eternal-september.org,
    >> Peter Taylor<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> typed:
    >>> On 7/29/2010 4:04 AM, Twayne wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> You mean you only *may* use it only exactly as specified
    >>>>> in the EULA. What you *can* do with it is another story.
    >>>>
    >>>> lol, maybe so in the classroom! If it's MS saying it, they
    >>>> are telling you what you CAN do with it. You MAY NOT do
    >>>> anything else<g>. It's like participles; sometimes it's
    >>>> hard to not use a participle without it hanging, on the
    >>>> end, of a sentence, about something, sort of. lol HTH,
    >>>>
    >>>> Twayne`
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> For example, if you want to have the same XP license on two
    >>> different computers, all you have to do is wait 120 days
    >>> after the first install was activated and then you can
    >>> install it on another machine and it will activate, become
    >>> genuine, etc. The EULA says you *may* not do that but in
    >>> practice, you *can*. The same thing is true with Office. It
    >>> doesn't matter if the license is OEM or Retail. The only
    >>> time you would would have a problem is if the license is a
    >>> branded OEM from the likes of Acer, HP or Dell.

    >>
    >> Untl you come to wanting to do updates or anything with the MS site
    >> that requires verification. 120 days doesn't mean the old records
    >> don't exist; they do.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > No, they don't. They wipe the slate every 120 days.
    >


    What would happen if "windows update" runs WGA on both machine within 120
    days?
     
  14. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor Flightless Bird

    On 7/31/2010 8:48 PM, Doum wrote:
    > Peter Taylor<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> écrivait
    > news:i2s5e2$a72$1@news.eternal-september.org:
    >
    >> On 7/29/2010 4:59 PM, Twayne wrote:
    >>> In news:i2s022$hs9$1@news.eternal-september.org,
    >>> Peter Taylor<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> typed:
    >>>> On 7/29/2010 4:04 AM, Twayne wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>> You mean you only *may* use it only exactly as specified
    >>>>>> in the EULA. What you *can* do with it is another story.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> lol, maybe so in the classroom! If it's MS saying it, they
    >>>>> are telling you what you CAN do with it. You MAY NOT do
    >>>>> anything else<g>. It's like participles; sometimes it's
    >>>>> hard to not use a participle without it hanging, on the
    >>>>> end, of a sentence, about something, sort of. lol HTH,
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Twayne`
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> For example, if you want to have the same XP license on two
    >>>> different computers, all you have to do is wait 120 days
    >>>> after the first install was activated and then you can
    >>>> install it on another machine and it will activate, become
    >>>> genuine, etc. The EULA says you *may* not do that but in
    >>>> practice, you *can*. The same thing is true with Office. It
    >>>> doesn't matter if the license is OEM or Retail. The only
    >>>> time you would would have a problem is if the license is a
    >>>> branded OEM from the likes of Acer, HP or Dell.
    >>>
    >>> Untl you come to wanting to do updates or anything with the MS site
    >>> that requires verification. 120 days doesn't mean the old records
    >>> don't exist; they do.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> No, they don't. They wipe the slate every 120 days.
    >>

    >
    > What would happen if "windows update" runs WGA on both machine within 120
    > days?


    Auto updates, with it set to inform but not download or install. Pick
    the updates you want when AU informs you there's updates available,
    although, as both are legit licenses, WGA would probably not squawk. WGA
    is not a security update so you can safely hide it from ever offering
    itself again, although, as new versions of WGA come out, they will also
    need to be hidden if you so choose to do so.

    --
    Peter Taylor
     
  15. KernelDebugger

    KernelDebugger Flightless Bird

    "Peter Taylor" <fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> wrote in message
    news:i31vcu$sed$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    > On 7/31/2010 8:48 PM, Doum wrote:
    >> Peter Taylor<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> écrivait
    >> news:i2s5e2$a72$1@news.eternal-september.org:
    >>
    >>> On 7/29/2010 4:59 PM, Twayne wrote:
    >>>> In news:i2s022$hs9$1@news.eternal-september.org,
    >>>> Peter Taylor<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> typed:
    >>>>> On 7/29/2010 4:04 AM, Twayne wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> You mean you only *may* use it only exactly as specified
    >>>>>>> in the EULA. What you *can* do with it is another story.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> lol, maybe so in the classroom! If it's MS saying it, they
    >>>>>> are telling you what you CAN do with it. You MAY NOT do
    >>>>>> anything else<g>. It's like participles; sometimes it's
    >>>>>> hard to not use a participle without it hanging, on the
    >>>>>> end, of a sentence, about something, sort of. lol HTH,
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Twayne`
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> For example, if you want to have the same XP license on two
    >>>>> different computers, all you have to do is wait 120 days
    >>>>> after the first install was activated and then you can
    >>>>> install it on another machine and it will activate, become
    >>>>> genuine, etc. The EULA says you *may* not do that but in
    >>>>> practice, you *can*. The same thing is true with Office. It
    >>>>> doesn't matter if the license is OEM or Retail. The only
    >>>>> time you would would have a problem is if the license is a
    >>>>> branded OEM from the likes of Acer, HP or Dell.
    >>>>
    >>>> Untl you come to wanting to do updates or anything with the MS site
    >>>> that requires verification. 120 days doesn't mean the old records
    >>>> don't exist; they do.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> No, they don't. They wipe the slate every 120 days.
    >>>

    >>
    >> What would happen if "windows update" runs WGA on both machine within 120
    >> days?

    >
    > Auto updates, with it set to inform but not download or install. Pick the
    > updates you want when AU informs you there's updates available, although,
    > as both are legit licenses, WGA would probably not squawk. WGA is not a
    > security update so you can safely hide it from ever offering itself again,
    > although, as new versions of WGA come out, they will also need to be
    > hidden if you so choose to do so.
    >
    > --
    > Peter Taylor


    I purchased a WinXP OEM CD from ebay, installed it and it activated okay. I
    went to MS updates, and kaboom, big screen warning, this version is
    fraudulent, this is not an authentic Microsoft product. So I turned it in
    for an authentic one.
     
  16. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor Flightless Bird

    On 8/5/2010 2:25 AM, KernelDebugger wrote:
    > "Peter Taylor"<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:i31vcu$sed$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >> On 7/31/2010 8:48 PM, Doum wrote:
    >>> Peter Taylor<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> écrivait
    >>> news:i2s5e2$a72$1@news.eternal-september.org:
    >>>
    >>>> On 7/29/2010 4:59 PM, Twayne wrote:
    >>>>> In news:i2s022$hs9$1@news.eternal-september.org,
    >>>>> Peter Taylor<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> typed:
    >>>>>> On 7/29/2010 4:04 AM, Twayne wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> You mean you only *may* use it only exactly as specified
    >>>>>>>> in the EULA. What you *can* do with it is another story.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> lol, maybe so in the classroom! If it's MS saying it, they
    >>>>>>> are telling you what you CAN do with it. You MAY NOT do
    >>>>>>> anything else<g>. It's like participles; sometimes it's
    >>>>>>> hard to not use a participle without it hanging, on the
    >>>>>>> end, of a sentence, about something, sort of. lol HTH,
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Twayne`
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> For example, if you want to have the same XP license on two
    >>>>>> different computers, all you have to do is wait 120 days
    >>>>>> after the first install was activated and then you can
    >>>>>> install it on another machine and it will activate, become
    >>>>>> genuine, etc. The EULA says you *may* not do that but in
    >>>>>> practice, you *can*. The same thing is true with Office. It
    >>>>>> doesn't matter if the license is OEM or Retail. The only
    >>>>>> time you would would have a problem is if the license is a
    >>>>>> branded OEM from the likes of Acer, HP or Dell.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Untl you come to wanting to do updates or anything with the MS site
    >>>>> that requires verification. 120 days doesn't mean the old records
    >>>>> don't exist; they do.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> No, they don't. They wipe the slate every 120 days.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> What would happen if "windows update" runs WGA on both machine within 120
    >>> days?

    >>
    >> Auto updates, with it set to inform but not download or install. Pick the
    >> updates you want when AU informs you there's updates available, although,
    >> as both are legit licenses, WGA would probably not squawk. WGA is not a
    >> security update so you can safely hide it from ever offering itself again,
    >> although, as new versions of WGA come out, they will also need to be
    >> hidden if you so choose to do so.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Peter Taylor

    >
    > I purchased a WinXP OEM CD from ebay, installed it and it activated okay. I
    > went to MS updates, and kaboom, big screen warning, this version is
    > fraudulent, this is not an authentic Microsoft product. So I turned it in
    > for an authentic one.
    >
    >


    How do you know you didn't get a false positive when you went to Windows
    Updates?

    --
    Peter Taylor
     
  17. KernelDebugger

    KernelDebugger Flightless Bird

    "Peter Taylor" <noemailspam@please.com.invalid> wrote in message
    news:i3e0qa$49e$2@news.eternal-september.org...
    > On 8/5/2010 2:25 AM, KernelDebugger wrote:
    >> "Peter Taylor"<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> wrote in message
    >> news:i31vcu$sed$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >>> On 7/31/2010 8:48 PM, Doum wrote:
    >>>> Peter Taylor<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> écrivait
    >>>> news:i2s5e2$a72$1@news.eternal-september.org:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On 7/29/2010 4:59 PM, Twayne wrote:
    >>>>>> In news:i2s022$hs9$1@news.eternal-september.org,
    >>>>>> Peter Taylor<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> typed:
    >>>>>>> On 7/29/2010 4:04 AM, Twayne wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> You mean you only *may* use it only exactly as specified
    >>>>>>>>> in the EULA. What you *can* do with it is another story.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> lol, maybe so in the classroom! If it's MS saying it, they
    >>>>>>>> are telling you what you CAN do with it. You MAY NOT do
    >>>>>>>> anything else<g>. It's like participles; sometimes it's
    >>>>>>>> hard to not use a participle without it hanging, on the
    >>>>>>>> end, of a sentence, about something, sort of. lol HTH,
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Twayne`
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> For example, if you want to have the same XP license on two
    >>>>>>> different computers, all you have to do is wait 120 days
    >>>>>>> after the first install was activated and then you can
    >>>>>>> install it on another machine and it will activate, become
    >>>>>>> genuine, etc. The EULA says you *may* not do that but in
    >>>>>>> practice, you *can*. The same thing is true with Office. It
    >>>>>>> doesn't matter if the license is OEM or Retail. The only
    >>>>>>> time you would would have a problem is if the license is a
    >>>>>>> branded OEM from the likes of Acer, HP or Dell.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Untl you come to wanting to do updates or anything with the MS site
    >>>>>> that requires verification. 120 days doesn't mean the old records
    >>>>>> don't exist; they do.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> No, they don't. They wipe the slate every 120 days.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> What would happen if "windows update" runs WGA on both machine within
    >>>> 120
    >>>> days?
    >>>
    >>> Auto updates, with it set to inform but not download or install. Pick
    >>> the
    >>> updates you want when AU informs you there's updates available,
    >>> although,
    >>> as both are legit licenses, WGA would probably not squawk. WGA is not a
    >>> security update so you can safely hide it from ever offering itself
    >>> again,
    >>> although, as new versions of WGA come out, they will also need to be
    >>> hidden if you so choose to do so.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Peter Taylor

    >>
    >> I purchased a WinXP OEM CD from ebay, installed it and it activated okay.
    >> I
    >> went to MS updates, and kaboom, big screen warning, this version is
    >> fraudulent, this is not an authentic Microsoft product. So I turned it
    >> in
    >> for an authentic one.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > How do you know you didn't get a false positive when you went to Windows
    > Updates?
    >
    > --
    > Peter Taylor


    False positive, no sir; Microsoft confirmed that the CD was counterfeit
    after I
    sent it to them; it was replaced free of charge.
     
  18. Peter Taylor

    Peter Taylor Flightless Bird

    On 8/6/2010 1:08 AM, KernelDebugger wrote:
    > "Peter Taylor"<noemailspam@please.com.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:i3e0qa$49e$2@news.eternal-september.org...
    >> On 8/5/2010 2:25 AM, KernelDebugger wrote:
    >>> "Peter Taylor"<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> wrote in message
    >>> news:i31vcu$sed$1@news.eternal-september.org...
    >>>> On 7/31/2010 8:48 PM, Doum wrote:
    >>>>> Peter Taylor<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> écrivait
    >>>>> news:i2s5e2$a72$1@news.eternal-september.org:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> On 7/29/2010 4:59 PM, Twayne wrote:
    >>>>>>> In news:i2s022$hs9$1@news.eternal-september.org,
    >>>>>>> Peter Taylor<fakeemail@fakeemail.com.invalid> typed:
    >>>>>>>> On 7/29/2010 4:04 AM, Twayne wrote:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> You mean you only *may* use it only exactly as specified
    >>>>>>>>>> in the EULA. What you *can* do with it is another story.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> lol, maybe so in the classroom! If it's MS saying it, they
    >>>>>>>>> are telling you what you CAN do with it. You MAY NOT do
    >>>>>>>>> anything else<g>. It's like participles; sometimes it's
    >>>>>>>>> hard to not use a participle without it hanging, on the
    >>>>>>>>> end, of a sentence, about something, sort of. lol HTH,
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Twayne`
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> For example, if you want to have the same XP license on two
    >>>>>>>> different computers, all you have to do is wait 120 days
    >>>>>>>> after the first install was activated and then you can
    >>>>>>>> install it on another machine and it will activate, become
    >>>>>>>> genuine, etc. The EULA says you *may* not do that but in
    >>>>>>>> practice, you *can*. The same thing is true with Office. It
    >>>>>>>> doesn't matter if the license is OEM or Retail. The only
    >>>>>>>> time you would would have a problem is if the license is a
    >>>>>>>> branded OEM from the likes of Acer, HP or Dell.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Untl you come to wanting to do updates or anything with the MS site
    >>>>>>> that requires verification. 120 days doesn't mean the old records
    >>>>>>> don't exist; they do.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> No, they don't. They wipe the slate every 120 days.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> What would happen if "windows update" runs WGA on both machine within
    >>>>> 120
    >>>>> days?
    >>>>
    >>>> Auto updates, with it set to inform but not download or install. Pick
    >>>> the
    >>>> updates you want when AU informs you there's updates available,
    >>>> although,
    >>>> as both are legit licenses, WGA would probably not squawk. WGA is not a
    >>>> security update so you can safely hide it from ever offering itself
    >>>> again,
    >>>> although, as new versions of WGA come out, they will also need to be
    >>>> hidden if you so choose to do so.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Peter Taylor
    >>>
    >>> I purchased a WinXP OEM CD from ebay, installed it and it activated okay.
    >>> I
    >>> went to MS updates, and kaboom, big screen warning, this version is
    >>> fraudulent, this is not an authentic Microsoft product. So I turned it
    >>> in
    >>> for an authentic one.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> How do you know you didn't get a false positive when you went to Windows
    >> Updates?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Peter Taylor

    >
    > False positive, no sir; Microsoft confirmed that the CD was counterfeit
    > after I
    > sent it to them; it was replaced free of charge.
    >
    >


    That was nice of them.

    --
    Peter Taylor
     

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